Mosaics

When you think of mosaics and ecclesiastical architecture, Harlem does not come to mind. However, the Shiloh Baptist Church at 131st and Adam Clayton Powell has a remarkable, 3 story high external mosaic on its facade.

Note the hair styles of the people looking up to the central cross.

And those turned away in shame:

Adam Clayton Powell Blvd, looking north from 130th Street

1910-1920?

And looking from the same spot, today

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8121306,-73.9459916,3a,75y,30.41h,67.53t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sZcwknfrC_c6-yqR9kOxP2Q!2e0!7i16384!8i8192

Consumer Debt Workshop Tonight

Tonight Ephesus Church is sponsoring an important workshop on Consumer Debt – how to avoid it, and if you get caught, how to get out of it. Tonight at 7:00 PM

Open Zoom and enter Meeting ID 948 2969 36611 Passcode 009058 or call 929.205.6099

Pet Friendly?

Localize looked at the data for pet friendly rental listings and came up with this:

Top pet-friendly Manhattan neighborhoods

  • Morningside Heights: 98%
  • Upper West Side: 84%
  • Greenwich Village: 83%
  • Washington Heights: 80%
  • East Harlem: 79%

While New Yorkers love their pets, many property managers don’t share the sentiment. The following neighborhoods are more challenging to find buildings that allow pets.

Worst neighborhoods for pet-friendly listings

  • Brooklyn: Park Slope (16%), Bedford Stuyvesant (24%), Crown Heights (33%)
  • Manhattan: Harlem (17%), East Village (19%), LES (23%)
  • Queens: Astoria (21%), Glen Oaks (29%)

While Park Slope had a higher overall score due to its proximity to dog parks and other amenities, it also ranks as a difficult neighborhood to find pet-friendly listings due to low inventory. It’s still possible to find pet-friendly apartments in the areas listed above, they just have the least number of available listings currently on the market. 

For more, see:

https://www.localize.city/blog/pet-friendly-neighborhoods-nyc/

The Tree of Hope III

On the Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd’s median, you can see a sculpture – The Tree of Hope III – at the location of the original Tree of Hope that was a talisman to performers in Harlem’s many clubs.

The style of the sculpture – the colors and form in particular – certainly situate it as a product of the early 70’s, but it has a vibrancy and panache that works (even if it’s too small for the location).