HNBA November Meeting: Tuesday, Nov. 10th at 7pm

The week after election day HNBA will hold its November meeting on Tuesday, November 10th at 7 PM.

We are looking forward to a fantastic lineup of guests, the first of which will be representatives from Chase bank who will talk about helping Harlem residents achieve home ownership, including:

 Applying for a mortgage
 Available Grants to help with the down payment
 2-4 unit properties – using rental income to qualify
 Multiple borrowers on one application
 Is now the time to refi? Pluses and minuses
 Working with a realtor
 Single-family
 Multi-family with rental income
 Market Condo
 Deed restricted condo
 Market co-op
 HDFC co-op

We will then meet Tali Farhadian Weinstein who is running for Manhattan DA. https://www.taliforda.com/ Tali and her staff recently join in on a walking tour of 125th Street from Lenox to Lexington to see first hand some of the major struggles we have with quality of life and small business development.

Tali Farhadian Weinstein is a prosecutor, a professor, and a proven criminal justice reformer.  She is also an immigrant, a daughter, a wife, and the mother of three girls. 

Lastly, Jana La Sorte from the NYC Parks Department will join us. Jana is the new administrator for the four Historic Harlem Parks — Jackie Robinson, Marcus Garvey, Morningside and St. Nicholas — that advocates for and supports the unique history and character of each park and their future development to better serve the greater Harlem community.

If you are a member of HNBA (Join Here) and would like to join in this exciting conversation on the 10th, email Shawn for the zoom link.

DWB (Driving While Black)

Join the New York & Virtual Premiere of dwb (driving while black) this evening until October 29th.

dwb (driving while black) isa new chamber opera about racism, erasure, and the fear and love that black parents experience when they send their kids out into a world that too often sees them not as a child, but as a threat. This powerful music-drama documents the all-too-familiar story of an African American parent whose beautiful brown boy approaches driving age. What should be a celebration of independence and maturity turns out to be fraught with the anxiety of “driving while black.”

REGISTER HERE (Registration required)

One of the most singularly devastating theatrical moments of the last year.” –The Pitch


“A composer of vivid imagination and skill” 
—Fanfare

“Singers are storytellers,” says soprano/librettist Roberta Gumbel (“silver voiced…” – The New York Times), “but rarely do we get the opportunity to help create the stories we are telling.” Collaborating with composer Susan Kander and the cutting-edge duo New Morse Code (“Clarity of artistic vision and near-perfect synchronicity.” icareifyoulisten.com), this brief, powerful music-drama documents the all-too-familiar story of an African-American parent whose “beautiful brown boy” approaches driving age as, what should be a celebration of independence and maturity is fraught with the anxiety of driving while black. 

Roberta Gumbel, librettist/soprano
Susan Kander, composer
Chip Miller, director
New Morse Code– Hannah Collins (cello) and Michael Compitello (percussion)

Uptown Grand Central’s Clean Team

It’s the one-year anniversary of UGC’s partnership with Positive Workforce to create our East 125th Clean Team.


Spot a yellow trashbag along East 125? These are the guys who cleaned it up for you.

And after being out there seven days a week, Uptown Grand Central’s 125th Street Clean Team filled 12,000 bags in the past year. 💛

Where Do They Live?

The oversaturation of substance use programs in Harlem and East Harlem has been proven repeatedly. Our community hosts many more programs than are justified by our population, by our addiction rates, or even by drug-related death rates.

One question remains, where do patients who are admitted to New York City substance abuse programs come from?

Using data from a 2020 FOIL request to OASAS on admission data, I have mapped where patients who attend NYC’s substance abuse programs come from. The result is fascinatingly national. From San Diego to Maine, from Miami Beach to Anchorage Alaska, men and women are admitted to New York addiction programs.

In the maps below, the red dots indicate the homes of people who are admitted to New York City’s substance abuse programs. The larger and darker the red, the greater number of admitted patients.

The fine print:

Admissions to NYS OASAS‐certified Chemical Dependence Treatment Programs Located
in NYC by Zip Code of Residence, from March 1, 2019 through February 29, 2020
Data Source: NYS OASAS Data Warehouse, CDS extract of 8/30/2020

  1. Admissions are not counts of individual people. A person can be admitted to treatment
    more than once throughout the time period.
  2. The data included in this presentation represent only admissions of patients to the
    OASAS‐certified treatment system. It is important to keep in mind that these data do not
    include individuals who do not enter treatment, get treated by the U.S. Department of
    Veterans Affairs (VA), go outside of New York State for treatment, are admitted to
    hospitals but not to Substance Use Disorder (SUD) treatment, get diverted to other
    systems, or receive an addictions medication from a physician outside of the OASAS
    system of care.
  3. Data includes significant others.
  4. Admissions are not limited to residents of NYC

To see the live map (you can hover over a dot to learn more):

https://fordham.carto.com/u/shill18/builder/dcea5644-f522-48dd-bba2-22078457109b/embed

Plastic Bags? Use a Tote, Instead

The delayed plastic bag ban has gone into effect, today.

Don’t forget to bring a tote with you whenever you leave the house. For an awesome option, try this stylish Harlem Tote:

https://www.etsy.com/listing/627213664/harlem-map-tote-bag

To see more great items:

https://afinelyne.pixels.com/

Cash for Guns, Today!

CASH FOR GUNS NO QUESTIONS ASKED!!!

GUN BUY BACK will be held on Saturday, October 17th, 2020.

Receive a $200 Pre-paid Card for Handguns and Assault Rifles Receive a $25 Pre-paid Card for Rifles, Shotguns, and Airguns Drop-Off Site:

Bethel Gospel Assembly 1832 Madison Avenue New York, NY 10035

Hours Open: 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M

CB11 Newsletter

MEETING SCHEDULE • WEEK OF OCTOBER 19
Public Safety & Transportation Committee
Monday • October 19th • 6:30pm
In order to attend this meeting, please register in advance for this webinar. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.Informational Updates with NYPD, DOT, & DANYCommittee Discussion FY 2022 Statement of District Needs & Budget RequestsStreet Co-naming Request in honor of Terence Cardinal Cooke at the Southeast Corner of Fifth Avenue and East 106th StreetCommittee discussion re: policy intervention to promote motor vehicular (e-bike, scooters, etc.) safety

District Needs & Budget Committee
Tuesday • October 20th • 6:30pm
In order to attend this meeting, please register in advance for this webinar. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.Introduction by MBPO Director of Budget and Capital ProjectsReview committee edits and finalize FY22 Statement of District Needs & Budget Request

Executive Committee
Thursday • October 22nd • 6:30pm
In order to attend this meeting, please register in advance for this webinar. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.Informational UpdatesStatement of District Needs & Budget Requests for Fiscal Year 2022View our full meeting schedule here

COMMUNITY NEWS & UPDATES
State enforcement of the ban on plastic bags begins October 19
Starting October 19, 2020 enforcement of the New York State Plastic Bag Ban and Paper Bag Fee will begin. Stores will be penalized for distributing single use plastic bags and must collect a 5-cent fee on paper bags. Learn more about the law here.

Apply to Become an Emergency Snow Laborer with DSNY
The New York City Department of Sanitation has announced that registration is now open for those interested in working as Emergency Snow Laborers for the upcoming winter season. Emergency Snow Laborers are per-diem workers who shovel snow and clear ice from bus stops, crosswalks, fire hydrants and step streets around the five boroughs after heavy snowfalls. Snow Laborers earn $15 per hour to start, and $22.50 per hour after 40 hours are worked in a week.
To better allow for social distancing and COVID-related protocols, those interested in becoming a Snow Laborer must register for a 15-minute application appointment at nyc.gov/snow. Registration appointments take place at the Department’s 59 garages. Snow laborers must be at least 18 years of age, be eligible to work in the United States, and capable of performing heavy physical labor. All applicants must bring the following items at the time of registration:Two small photos (1 ½ square)Original and copy of two forms of identificationSocial Security cardTogo

New York City Releases Winter Outdoor Dining Guidance
Mayor Bill de Blasio joined the Department of Buildings (DOB), Department of Transportation (DOT), and the Fire Department of New York (FDNY) to release thorough guidance for city restaurants planning to stay open and serve customers outdoors with heating devices this fall and winter.
Participants in the Open Restaurants program interested in providing comfort heating for their customers in outdoor dining areas have three options:
Electric radiant heaters will be allowed in sidewalk and roadway seating setups. For full guidance from the Department of Buildings, click here.Natural gas radiant heaters will be allowed on the sidewalk only. For full guidance from the Department of Buildings, click here. Natural gas radiant heaters must also comply with the Fire Code.Portable heaters fueled by propane will be allowed on the sidewalk only. Propane heating will be regulated by the Fire Department, with requirements for safe handling, use and storage. For full guidance from the Fire Department, click here.

Movie Night with the International Puerto Rican Heritage Film Festival, with host/curator/CB11 Vice Chair Xavier Santiago
City lights, movie night. Head to the Open Street at East 101st & Lexington each Saturday night at 7 p.m. in October for award-winning film shorts curated by the International Puerto Rican Heritage Film Festival. Films include: Boricua, Dak Toka Taino, El Caballero, Boriqueneers, Ubering, The Step, Pie, Coqui Serenade, and more.

NYCEM Community Preparedness announces Strengthening Communities Through Recovery RFP
NYC Emergency Management released a new Strengthening Communities through Recovery COVID-19 grant opportunity.
Any interested community leader or community emergency networks that serves one of the below communities should apply. A community emergency network is a group or coalition that consists of nonprofit, community, and faith-based organizations that are organized around an issue important to their community such as climate change, gun violence, housing, disability rights, among others.
Apply by 10/20/20 at 5PM. Access the application here.
Proposals and questions about the RFP process should be emailed to Abdul Washington at procurement@oem.nyc.gov.

East Harlem Walks 2.0 Returns!
In collaboration with Randall’s Island Park Alliance, Harlem Run and with DOHMH East Harlem Neighborhood Health Center is hosting an array of walks and will have opportunities to earn entries to community races/fundraisers as well as gift cards. RSVP is required.

10/24/20 at 11am: Natural Areas Tour in Randall’s Island Randall’s Island Park is host to many acres of gorgeous wetland habitat, including our five-acre Little Hell Gate Salt Marsh and one of the city’s only freshwater wetlands. RIPA’s tours showcase these brilliant spaces and offer participants the opportunity to learn about how wetlands function and their ecological importance in an urban setting. Participants can enjoy viewing beautiful wildflowers, birds and other native wildlife while learning about some of the fascinating history that has shaped the natural areas on the Island. Meet snowy egrets, yellow crowned night herons, red-tailed hawks, and more! Please join us for a one-hour tour. Each person must register, including all children, so that we can be sure to stay within our meeting number guidelines. And everyone over the age of two must agree to wear a mask. RSVP here.
If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Agdalisa Rivera via email at or via riveraadalgisal@gmail.com text at (917) 653-1315.
Have any updates to share? Email Carly Wine, our Assistant District Manager, at cwine@cb11m.org. ‌  ‌

Mail In Your Vote and Honor Wesley A. Williams

The image (above) from The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is of Wesley A. Williams, a Black mail carrier/driver from 1915. Wesley was photographed under the presidency of Woodrow Wilson, a notoriously racist American President who re:segregated the Post Office (from Vox – https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2015/11/20/9766896/woodrow-wilson-racist):

Easily the worst part of Wilson’s record as president was his overseeing of the resegregation of multiple agencies of the federal government, which had been surprisingly integrated as a result of Reconstruction decades earlier. At an April 11, 1913, Cabinet meeting, Postmaster General Albert Burleson argued for segregating the Railway Mail Service. He took exception to the fact that workers shared glasses, towels, and washrooms. Wilson offered no objection to Burleson’s plan for segregation, saying that he “wished the matter adjusted in a way to make the least friction.”

Both Burleson and Treasury Secretary William McAdoo took Wilson’s comments as authorization to segregate. The Department of Treasury and Post Office Department both introduced screened-off workspaces, separate lunchrooms, and separate bathrooms. In a 1913 open letter to Wilson, W.E.B. DuBois — who had supported Wilson in the 1912 election before being disenchanted by his segregation policies — wrote of “one colored clerk who could not actually be segregated on account of the nature of his work [and who] consequently had a cage built around him to separate him from his white companions of many years.” That’s right: Black people who couldn’t, logistically, be segregated were put in literal cages.

I, of course, don’t know what Wesley’s take would be on our current president and his efforts to sabotage the US Postal Service in order to give him an electoral advantage, but I hope that in Wesley’s spirit (if you are going to vote by mail) that you vote as early as possible, and as carefully as possible, in order to insure that your vote counts in 2020.

This image is a part of Photoville – this year an outdoor exhibition of photography throughout the 5 boroughs. See: https://photoville.nyc/exhibitions/ for more information.

The photo of Welsey is featured in St. Nicholas Park.

Billy Eckstine

Photoville’s exhibit on 145th Street at Bradhurst features a number of wonderful images of mid-century Black America. Billy Eckstine was ‘a neighbor’, living at the corner of 5th Avenue and 126th Street:

25th Precinct Officers and Community Council Clothing Giveaway

East Harlem is Overburdened with 14% of Drug Treatment Capacity in NYC

While East Harlem has 1.5% of New York City’s population, it has 13.6% of New York City’s drug treatment capacity, according to data as of 2019 from NY agency OASAS. The graphic below illustrates how severely East Harlem is oversaturated with drug treatment facilities. This unfair social injustice MUST END!

East Harlem has 1.5% of population but 13.6% of drug treatment capacity
Data source: NYC Government OASAS Agency as a FOIL request by Y Pielet as of April 2019

With so many patients commuting into East Harlem for drug treatment, our district is overburdened while already struggling with other social, environmental, economic, and educational issues. Petition to your elected officials – Send Email or call them -to either dramatically reduce our 13.6% burden or perhaps allocate 13.6% of New York City’s budget as a compensation for this injustice.

Drilling down to the data, we can see that Beth Israel Medical Center and Harlem East Life Plan alone contribute to nearly 60% of the capacity. Elected officials should immediately discuss ways to reduce this capacity.

Beth Israel and Harlem East Life Plan represent 60% of the district's capacity

As for which district is not receiving its fair share of drug treatment capacities? Data speaks for itself

Manhattan is oversaturated with drug treatment capacities

2nd Avenue Subway

The City reports that despite a budget crisis, the MTA continues to plan for extending the Second Avenue Subway into East Harlem. Even though the pandemic-spurred economic crisis has put the project back, the MTA continues to work with building and property owners to try to purchase sites needed for air shafts, emergency exits, subway entrances, etc.

The map below illustrates in orange, properties that might be acquired, and in yellow, the proposed 2nd Avenue subway line:

The agency has started taking steps to prepare for using eminent domain a last resort.

At its July board meeting, the MTA said it has begun the process of acquiring over a dozen properties along Second Avenue and 125th Street through “negotiated voluntary agreements,” according to agency records.

If agreements can’t be reached “in a timely manner,” documents show, the MTA must take preliminary steps under the state’s Eminent Domain Procedure Law to lessen the potential for future delays to the project.

For more on the story, see: https://www.thecity.nyc/2020/9/20/21446021/mta-property-second-avenue-subway-eminent-domain-transit

The 25th Precinct – Precinct Navigators

The 25th Precinct is looking for community volunteers to act as precinct navigators. All neighbors who volunteer will receive training and support. To learn more, please contact:

 Detective Darryl Lucas

 25th Precinct Community  Affairs

 Office: (212) 860-6526

 E-mail: Darryl.lucas@nypd.org

Build the Block – Thursday at 5:30 pm

Sector C of the 25th Precinct will be holding a Build The Block event on Thursday at 5:30 pm at Ginjan Cafe – Park/125. Sector C is the sliver north of 115th Street, between 5th and Park Avenues.

Bring any public safety concerns to the meeting.

Schools+COVID+Apps…

For everyone, not just families with children, the potential for schools to be vectors for the explosion of winter COVID cases is huge. The DoE has a useful map to help everyone, but parents in particular, learn about COVID impacted schools.

🔴 A red dot indicates a building that has been closed.

🔵 A blue dot indicates one or more classrooms in a building that has been closed.

Unfortunately, as you can see on the map, Harlem and East Harlem have been been severely impacted. Below is a more detailed view of our community:

To keep up and stay informed, use the link below. Note that the map is updated Sunday through Friday (not Saturday):

https://www.schools.nyc.gov/school-year-20-21/return-to-school-2020/health-and-safety/daily-covid-case-map

New York’s New COVID Alert App

The New York Department of Health has launched a new, free app that will tell you if you’ve come in contact with a COVID-positive person. COVID Alert NY is available as of today for iPhone and Android. Using your phone’s Bluetooth technology, it will alert you if you’ve been within six feet of an infected person for more than 10 minutes.

In a press conference call yesterday, Governor Cuomo said he believes the app is the first of its kind in the nation. It cost $700,000 to develop and was paid for through a combination of federal dollars and support from Bloomberg Philanthropies. The Bluetooth technology–which senses proximity to other phones–was developed by Google and Apple in conjunction with MIT. The Linux Foundation and Tech:NYC also collaborated on the app.

The technology works to sense “close contact”–that within six feet and for at least 10 minutes (it ignores people who you just pass by or were farther than six feet from). When your phone senses close contact, it exchanges a secure random code with the other person’s phone, and your phone stores this close contact code in a list. If a person tests positive, the Department of Health contacts them and gives them a password that they can enter into the app that will then alert people moving forward. The DOH will also ask the positive person if he or she is willing to share their app’s list of close contacts to alert those they’ve been in contact with previously. It’s completely voluntary and no names or privacy information will be shared, which is the reason the app was developed with Bluetooth technology instead of GPS.

Cleaner police garage on 118 St and Park

Inspired by the discussion in HBNA’s September meeting, the folks on the block of 118 Street and Park helped clean up the pile of trash in the police garage under the metro north rail. The trash picked up completely fill one large trash bag. Please help to keep the area clean for our children and residents!

Police garage on 118 Street and Park Avenue - before clean up
Before clean up

Police garage on 118 and Park - after clean up
After clean up

CB11 Full Board Meeting

Tonight CB11 will have a full board meeting and discuss budget priorities.  Harlem Neighborhood Block Association is asking for two things to be highlighted in the budgetary report including:

  • We are requesting a City Council analysis of the distribution of addiction programs throughout the five boroughs, with a mandate to recommend how the rebalancing of these programs can be implemented. In conjunction, we are requesting a City Council agreement on a moratorium of any new or expanded addiction programs in CB11.
    • New York City must address how the persistence of OASAS and DOHMH licensed addiction programs in CB11 that exceed community need (and primarily serve New Yorkers from other communities) – is a form of systemic racism.
    • OASAS and DOHMH have quietly avoided acknowledging that their siting decisions are not based on their own data regarding proportionate community need, but are racially and economically driven instead, and along with indifferent city agencies and politicians, they routinely oversaturate Black and Latinx communities with the addiction programs that wealthier and whiter neighborhoods reject.
    • The impact of this decades-in-the-making form of systemic racism has been to brutalize the quality of life for East Harlem residents, degrade the economic viability of the East Harlem business community, and discourage tourism and development in the 125th Street and Lexington Avenue corridors.
  • Marcus Garvey Park is a jewel in our community. We ask that CB11 request and advocate for security cameras to be installed in this park to enhance public safety for the children, teens, families, and residents who enjoy it.

If you are interested in joining the conversation, tonight starting at 6:30 please follow the calendar link, here:
http://www.cb11m.org/pmcalendar/

Oral History

The Schomburg has an amazing collection of oral history of Harlem residents. Some names you’ll certainly know as big-name political and cultural figures. Others, are neighbors:

This is a neighborhood oral history project that works to both preserve and document Harlem history through the stories of people who have experienced it. This project will collect oral histories of people who have lived or worked in the surrounding Harlem neighborhood and train community members to conduct these interviews. Both longtime and more recent residents are invited to share their neighborhood stories, documenting Harlem’s past and present history. Interviews will be preserved at The Milstein Division, available in a circulating collection, and accessible here at the New York Public Library website.

Take a moment and listen to the voices:

http://oralhistory.nypl.org/neighborhoods/harlem