Museum of Civil Rights in Harlem

(from Urbanize: https://urbanize.city/nyc/post/revealed-one45-museum-civil-rights-harlem-designed-shop-architects)

One45 and Shop Architects are proposing a nearly one-million square foot mixed-use development proposed for West Harlem on a portion of a block bounded by West 144th and 145th Street, Lenox Avenue, and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard.

A draft scope of work submitted to the city reveals two new towers that would rise about 360 feet apiece and contain space for office, retail, residential (866-939 units, of which 217-282 would be made affordable), and a banquet hall/event area for community use. 

Most notably, the development will also include a brand new 48,000-square-foot space for the Museum of Civil Rights (MCR), an institution founded by Reverend Al Sharpton, in collaboration with Judge Jonathan Lippman, focused on educating individuals on the contemporary struggles for civil rights, political rights, and social justice in the northern United States. Sharpton’s National Action Network (NAN) will also establish its headquarters in one of the buildings.

The developer, simply listed as “One45 Lenox, LLC” on city documents, is seeking to rezone a nearly full-block parcel to make way for the outsized development, which otherwise would allow for only 325,000 square feet to be built as of right.

Museum Program (top) | The Harlem Forum (bottom) | SHoP Architects

As the building’s anchor, MCR will boast several incredible spaces, notable for both their design and thought line. 

This includes The Harlem Forum, a flexible programming space that will boast sweeping views of the city from its perch above the tallest tower; The Harlem Lab for Social Change, a state-of-the-art laboratory for media production and the creative arts connected to social justice; The Rooftop Teaching Garden, which has been conceived as a teaching space that will serve as a site for harvesting fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as a platform for community organizations to educate visitors about local foodways and contemporary food systems; and a community-curated gallery to showcase local talent.

MCR’s website describes the interior design as being “inspired by Harlem’s architecture, particularly its brownstone stoops,” filled with spaces where visitors can “gather, connect, and recharge.” 

The proposal puts forward a plan to construct the two buildings in one phase, an estimated 38-month process that would finish in 2026 if all the necessary approvals are obtained.

Demolition permits have already been filed for most of the one-story structures currently making up One45’s parcel (this includes an office building containing the NAN’s existing headquarters). Other lots in consideration remain wholly vacant.

Boarded Up

Plywood and cinderblock in the windows. A new roller blind. The stained glass arched windows, filled in and cemented over.

Found on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd.

Tree Cover

The number of trees and the area shaded by them influences many neighborhood factors, such as attractiveness and lower summer temperatures that, in turn, encourage residents and visitors to walk and do other physical activity. “Tree canopy cover” measures the percent of a neighborhood that is covered (or shaded) by trees.

 About the Measure

Tree Canopy Cover – Percent

How Calculated: 

Tree canopy cover represents a ‘top down’ mapping perspective in which tree canopy over-hanging city features (such as sidewalks) is measured. The percent is calculated by dividing the area of tree canopy in km2 within the UHF neighborhood by the total land area (excluding inland water bodies). Higher percentages indicate greater tree canopy cover, with zero representing no tree canopy cover.

Source: The Built Environment & Health Project (BEH), Columbia University

Harlem

As found on the Fred R. Moore public school on 5th Avenue.

Black Baseball

Untapped Cities has a great article on Black baseball teams, stadiums, and history: https://untappedcities.com/2021/02/18/black-baseball-sites-nyc/

The image (above) of The Lincoln Giants is not only a powerful photograph of athletic confidence and poise, it also shows a team that played here, in Harlem.

In New York, the Lincoln Giants (1911-30), became a barnstorming juggernaut, going 108-12 their first season. They featured pitching legend Smokey Joe Williams and shortstop John Henry (Pop) Lloyd, who Babe Ruth believed was the greatest player who ever lived. Alas, there was no house that Pop built; the Lincoln Giants mostly played home games at Olympic Field in Harlem between 1911 and 1919.

The location of their playing ground is where Riverton Houses now lies:

Olympic Field opened in 1904 in the middle of Harlem at East 136th and Fifth Ave. Enthusiastic crowds in the thousands, often significantly white, watched the Lincoln Giants take on challengers there, from semi-pro teams to major-leaguers. They developed a fierce rivalry with the Brooklyn Eagle Giants for the “Colored Championship of Greater New York.”  When the field was razed for a parking garage in 1920, the grandstands were relocated to the Catholic Protectory Oval, the Lincoln Giants’ new home.

Stephen Robertson, in his wonderful baseball blog https://drstephenrobertson.com/digitalharlemblog/maps/baseball-1920s-harlem/ writes:

In 1911, Harlem gained its own black professional baseball team, the Lincoln Giants. The white brothers, Edward and Jess McMahon, established the team, obtaining a lease on Olympic Field, at 136th Street and 5th Avenue, where the team played home games on Sundays, the only day off for most black workers. Initially managed by Sol White, a well-known former player, the team included five of the best black players in the nation, recruited away from teams in Chicago and Philadelphia. This formidable combination propelled the Lincoln Giants to a dominant record in their first three years.  Many of those wins came against teams of whites, including teams, or all-star teams, from the segregated major leagues.  Those interracial contests drew the largest crowds, including significant numbers of whites; in fact, on several occasions, as many as 10,000 fans packed into Olympic Field, spilling onto the playing area. Whites also attended games between black teams, often making up as many as a third of the spectators. Despite the absence of segregated seating, there are no reports of friction in the mixed crowds; most of the conflict at games centered on the umpires, who were almost invariably white, even in games involving black teams.

In 1914, the McMahons’ financial difficulties forced them to sell the Lincoln Giants and the rights to Olympic Field to two other white men, James Keenan and Charles Harvey.  Many of the players, however, remained contracted to the McMahons, who for three years operated another team, the Lincoln Stars, based at the Lenox Oval, on 145th Street. When that team folded, the McMahons abandoned baseball, but not Harlem: in the 1920s they took control of the Commonwealth Casino, on East 135th Street, where they staged boxing, including interracial bouts, and, from 1922-24, operated a black professional basketball team, the Commonwealth Big  5.

While the Lincoln Giants had regained their position as Harlem’s team, they played in the neighborhood for only three more years. In 1919, developers transformed Olympic Field into a parking garage, forcing Keenan and Harvey to relocate home games to the Catholic Protectory Oval, at East Tremont Avenue and Unionport Road in the Bronx, taking with them the grandstand and bleachers from their former home.  Surrounded by the gothic structures of the orphanage, and shaded by trees, the field was beautiful but very small. To get there, fans from Harlem had to take a long journey by subway to 177th Street and and then take a street car. The Lincoln Giants would play there until 1930.

Detect Coming to East Harlem

At 69 East 125th Street in Harlem, Greystone leased 3,500 square feet to Detect, a COVID-19 data collection center. The retail space was previously occupied by the Mike Bloomberg presidential campaign and has also served as a seasonal Ricky’s Halloween pop-up store. Detect is a molecular diagnostics company that provides take-home, rapid COVID-19 tests. 

Register To Vote!

The deadline to register to vote is Friday, May 28 and early voting begins on Saturday, June 12. The deadline to request an absentee ballot is June 15.

Free Concerts in Marcus Garvey Park this Weekend

National Black Theatre is partnering with the New York Philharmonic to bring NY Phil Bandwagon 2 to Marcus Garvey Park in Harlem!

NY Phil Bandwagon 2 is a series of four weekend-long festivals across New York City, May 7–30, 2021. Performances will feature Philharmonic musicians and more than 100 New York artists, which span artistic disciplines from reggae, jazz, and opera, to dance, poetry, theatre, film, and visual art.  All performances will take place on a customized, mobile, 20-foot shipping container featuring a foldout stage and LED video wall.

Comptroller Candidates

The final list of NYC Comptroller Candidates is in:

You can see the NY Board of Elections full list of all races and candidates, here: https://vote.nyc/sites/default/files/pdf/candidates/2021/ContestList_6.22.2021_PDF_PrimaryElection_4.27.2021_.pdf

HBCU College Fair

The NYPD and the 28th Precinct is inviting you to their 1st HBCU College Fair that will take place on June 5th, 2021 from 1200-1600 hrs. It will take place in the rear of the 28th precinct 2271 8th Avenue (St. Nicholas btw W 122st & W 123rd St). Please share with any youth you know that may be interested in attending college. Also, if you can post on your social media accounts that would be awesome. Hope to see you there! Thank you.  

Police Officer Yvonne Edwards

28TH PRECINCT Youth Coordination Officer

PATROL BOROUGH MANHATTAN NORTH

2271-89 8TH AVENUE

New York, NY 10027

212-678-1611

929-281-4228 Dept cell

#NYPD​4theKids

Follow us on FB – https://www.facebook.com/NYPDYouth 

and IG – https://www.instagram.com/nypdyouthstrategies/

Did You Know…”

The Community Affairs Bureau offers a variety of information including personal safety tips and local events. Sign up today, by visiting www.nypdcommunityaffairs.com for more information.” or by texting NYPD to 22828

http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/community_affairs/newsletter_signup.shtml

Uptown Grand Central Strikes Again

Uptown Grand Central, our amazing business alliance group, has done a fantastic job to beautify tree pits that it protected with metal guards a few years ago.

Thanks so much, Uptown Grand Central, for all you do!

And yes, you can help beautify your community too (this weekend)!

Print allIn new windowGreen and Blue Eco Care
Hey everyone! How have you been?? I hope this email finds you well. 
Are you following us on Instagram and Facebook yet? Have you seen all the incredible events we already had this year? Feeling so grateful and humbled here. It’s amazing what we can do together! Check pictures of our events on our social media! 
We already collected hundreds of pounds of litter from our streets in East Harlem, bringing awareness about this major problem in our community and planet! This year we have also been planting sunflower seeds and other wildflowers on the street tree beds, for the benefit of our urban ecosystem and to beautify and uplift our community.  Who can be sad or mad staring at a sunflower? The weather has been unpredictable and birds are having to adapt fast, but we hope our flowers can sustain pollinators’ lives and feed the birds too. Here’s where we planted so far:
Sunflower Map.jpg

We are very excited to team up with Friends of the East River Esplanade (60th-120th st) to create pollinators gardens on our riverfront near 96th St. Join us this Saturday and don’t miss the fun. Feel free to invite your contacts. Volunteers must be 18+ for this specific event. Please RSVP.
EH Esplanade Final.jpg


Friends of the East River Esplanade (60th-120th st) invite kids for this fun event:
Screen Shot 2021-05-10 at 3.12.24 PM.png
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/youth-fishing-clinic-in-east-harlem-tickets-152414775697

And this Sunday, Growing Green is hosting their first event in Harlem and we’ll be there to support them! Let’s see what many artists and dedicated volunteers can create together? Let me know if you are joining the fun. 11am in front of the Apollo Theatre. Growing Green.jpg

We’ll keep you posted about the events on May 22nd at the Thomas Jefferson Park and Sunshine Playground. Save the date! 
Cheers!🌳🌻

Simone [email protected]

Subway Station Density

Many New Yorkers rely on the subway as their primary mode of transportation. Neighborhoods with greater subway access tend to have more foot traffic, making surrounding real estate highly desirable for residents and business. Subway use encourages active transportation (walking, biking), which improves the health of residents.

 About the Measure

Subway Station Density – Number per km2

How Calculated: 

Subway station density measure takes into account multiple route-transfer opportunities at one subway station and each stop is counted only once regardless of how many route-transfer opportunities are available at any given subway station. Density is calculated by dividing the count of MTA subways stations as of 2012 by the total land area in km2 of the UHF neighborhood (excluding inland water bodies).

For more information, visit http://beh.columbia.edu/.

Source: The Built Environment & Health Project (BEH), Columbia University

Manhattan District Attorney

The NY Board of Elections has a ‘final’ list of Manhattan DA Candidates:

You can see other races and their candidates, here: https://vote.nyc/sites/default/files/pdf/candidates/2021/ContestList_6.22.2021_PDF_PrimaryElection_4.27.2021_.pdf

Mayoral Forum, Focused on MWBE Issues: Tomorrow Afternoon

Free String Jazz Concert, Saturday

The Harlem Rose Garden is delighted to offer you another performance in the garden this Saturday at 2PM.

6 E 129th St, New York, NY 10035

Judith Insell / Joe Fonda Duo – Dark Wood Explorations Project

Chamber jazz dominated by the dark, rich tones of the viola and bass as played by the Judith Insell / Joe Fonda Duo, focuses on the hidden subtleties of jazz and improvisation: harmonic possibilities and the variety of timbres of their instruments. The intimate, interwoven, and often fragile “Dark Wood Explorations” Project is comprised of compositions by John Coltrane, Richie Beirach and Bill Evans, as well as original compositions.

visit http://www.judithinsell.com/gallery for reviews

Please come from 1:30PM to pick a seat.  No signup required – we will close when we’re at capacity.

Our rain date will be Sat., May 22nd same time.

Look forward to seeing you soon!

🌷
🌿
☀

NYC Water Supply

The DEP publishes an annual report on the quality and safety of New York’s amazing water supply. As you likely know, we get our water mostly from Croton and the Catskills:

The DEP has a number of ways in which you can reduce your exposure to lead:

  • Run Your Tap. for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking, when your water has been sitting for several hours.
  • Use Cold Water. for cooking, drinking, or preparing infant formula. Hot tap water is more likely to
    contain lead and other metals.
  • Remove & Clean the faucet screen monthly (also called an aerator), where small particles can get trapped.
  • Hire a licensed plumber to identify and replace plumbing fixtures and/or service line that contain lead.

The annual report can be found here:

https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dep/downloads/pdf/water/drinking-water/drinking-water-supply-quality-report/2020-drinking-water-supply-quality-report.pdf

Manhattan Borough President Candidate List

The NY Board of Elections has a ‘final’ list of Manhattan Borough President candidates:

See this PDF for more candidates in other races: https://vote.nyc/sites/default/files/pdf/candidates/2021/ContestList_6.22.2021_PDF_PrimaryElection_4.27.2021_.pdf

East Harlem Diversion Center

The city touted a new initiative to divert mental health crisis incidents to an East Harlem Diversion Center on East 116th Street as far back as 2014. By 2018, when Project Renewal acquired a lease for the new facility, the city committed to investing $9.5 million annually to serve about 2,400 people each year at the centers.

The centers were to be open at all hours and staff will not be allowed to turn away anybody brought in by police. At the same time, people brought to the centers must consent to receive services such as health care and social services. The centers would not be used as homeless shelters and the maximum stay allowed is 10 days depending on a person’s needs.

According to The City, Mayor de Blasio last week quietly changed the name of ThriveNYC — the heavily criticized $1 billion mental health program spearheaded by the city’s first lady, Chirlane McCray — to the Mayor’s Office of Community Mental Health. The City also reports that the Diversion Center on 116th Street has served only 45 people since finally opening in November — coming out to $1.1 million per visit so far. 

To read the scathing report on the project, see:

https://www.thecity.nyc/2021/5/9/22426250/thrive-nyc-nypd-diversion-centers-for-mentally-ill-sit-empty

Gospel at the Apollo

The temple of song and a 1970’s Apollo flyer on Ebay

East River Plaza

Most Harlem residents have visited East River Plaza (Target, Costco, Aldi, etc.) at 117th street and Harlem River Drive at least once over the years.

The site – owned by Brookfield Properties – was once a wire factory that made springs, musical wires (think pianos), and industrial and commercial wires of every sort.

I recently came across an item for sale, clipped from a vintage newspaper, that not only showed the huge number of wire products produced, but also the factory itself.

Note that the factory was directly on the water, and a sailing ship was docked at the factory (no Harlem River Drive), showing that the factory was located there precisely for water transportation of supplies and the finished wire products.

For many drivers on the Harlem River Drive, the factory was a landmark until it was razed for the shopping complex.

Here is the link to the item:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/174724184415?ul_noapp=true

PVC

Over on the west side of Harlem, a creative entrepreneur built a sidewalk extension out of PVC pipes. It’s a creative strategy that never would have occurred to me, but somehow works.

You might not immediately identify it when you first see it from a distance:

but up close, it’s definitely PVC in all its glory.

Mayoral Debate Regarding East Harlem on Monday

Patch’s Nick Garber reports:

Amid complaints that East Harlem has been neglected by the city government, a forum next week will force candidates for mayor to explain how they would serve the neighborhood if elected.

Monday’s mayoral forum will be hosted by the East Harlem Community Alliance, a collection of more than 200 organizations across the neighborhood. It will start at 6 p.m., broadcast live on Facebook and on Manhattan Neighborhood News.

The six participants include five of the leading candidates in the June 22 Democratic mayoral primary: Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, Comptroller Scott Stringer, former Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia, former finance executive Ray McGuire and the nonprofit leader Dianne Morales.

“East Harlem is one of the most underserved communities in New York City, and so it is vitally important that we hear directly from the candidates how they plan to address the needs of this community,” said David Nocenti, executive director of Union Settlement and chair of the Alliance, in a statement.

It will be moderated by Nocenti and Nilsa Orama, director of the East Harlem Multi-Service Center and chair of Community Board 11.

East Harlem has higher poverty rates and a lower median income than the rest of the city. In recent months, leaders have complained that the neighborhood has fallen behind in the vaccine rollout despite being worst-hit by COVID-19 than any other part of Manhattan.

After Monday’s mayoral forum, a panel of representatives from East Harlem organizations will discuss the issues raised during the event.

Participants will be: Walter Roberts, executive director of Hope Community Inc.; Eric Donovan Estades, C.O.O. and General Counsel of East Harlem Council for Human Services; Ana Chireno, director of government and community affairs for El Museo del Barrio; and Shirley Annan, ministry programs coordinator at Bethel Gospel Assembly.

See the full post:

https://patch.com/new-york/harlem/harlem-group-grill-mayoral-candidates-forum