Seize the King

Run, don’t walk to the best theater in New York happening right now in Marcus Garvey Park.

Seize the King is a witty, moving adaptation of Shakespeare’s Richard the Third that will thrill and challenge you.

Get there immediately as the performances end on July 29th!

https://www.cthnyc.org/seize-the-king/

How Long Does It Take To Build In NYC?

Between 2016 and this year, it took an average of 545 business days, or roughly two calendar years, for a developer to go from initially filing a project proposal with the DOB to receiving the first certificate of occupancy, the department said. The process took the longest time in Manhattan, about three years, and the shortest time on Staten Island, about a year and a half.

Crains has an article on this building in East Harlem:

https://www.crainsnewyork.com/news/case-study-what-it-took-get-affordable-apartment-project-built-east-harlem

July 31st – Tour East Harlem Parks

Join Manhattan’s Community Board 11 Environment, Open Space & Parks Committee in a fantastic tour of 14 parks in upper East Harlem.

The tour starts at Marcus Garvey Park – where 5th Avenue and 120th Street meet, on Saturday, July 31st, at 10:00 AM.

It’s Not My Trash, But It’s My Planet

If you are around this week, on Saturday we are caring for our street trees on 103rd St (near the subway station on Lexington Ave) and supporting a new local business. Our friends from Mojo Desserts are opening a Brazilian-Belgian bar right next to Mojo! We’ll head to Bar Goyana after our clean up. For the grand opening they are making Brazilian Feijoada (beans and pork stew, but they have a vegetarian option too), Caipirinhas (Brazilian drink made with cachaça rum) and live music on Saturday and Sunday.  Follow their Instagram to make your reservations  @bargoyana 
Cheers!Simone @greenandblueecocare 

Reading Circle in Marcus Garvey Park

Please join The Marcus Garvey Park Alliance [MGPA]

for great read-aloud and fun literacy activities for school-aged children!

*Every Wednesday Throughout the Summer

   11:00am – 12:00pm

  • July 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th
  • August 4th, 11th

Marcus Garvey Park, Northwest Lawn (123rd & Mount Morris Park West)

Tour The Storefront Academy Today

OPEN HOUSE Happening at Storefront Academy Charter School Harlem!

Please join the Storefront Academy (now a charter school) in July or August on Thursdays from 9am-12pm to take a tour of their school!

We want to share information about our amazing school with you and our Harlem Community! Now Enrolling Grades K-3!

Corn? In East Harlem?

Yes, community gardeners are growing corn in East Harlem. The plants you see below are well over 6′ tall already.

Restaurant Week in Harlem

Uptown Grand Central has a fantastic list of local restaurants to check out during Restaurant Week.

This summer’s NYC Restaurant Week marks its longest run ever (five weeks!), with more than 500 restaurants in 75 neighborhoods to choose from. For the second time ever, a significant number of Harlem restaurants are participating.

Check out Uptown Grand Central’s amazing businesses and the work they do here: https://uptowngrandcentral.org/ and then check out these 30+ eateries to explore:

EAST HARLEM

  1. Amuse Bouche Bistro
  2. Au Jus Oklahoma BBQ
  3. La Avenida
  4. Dear Mama (East Harlem)
  5. East Harlem Bottling Co.
  6. El Paso Restaurante
  7. Jaguar
  8. Malii Thai Kitchen
  9. Nocciola
  10. Pro Thai
  11. Sisters Caribbean Cuisine

CENTRAL HARLEM

  1. 67 Orange Street
  2. Angel of Harlem
  3. Archer & Goat
  4. Bixi
  5. Chocolat
  6. Fieldtrip
  7. Harlem Shake
  8. Lido
  9. LoLo’s Seafood Shack
  10. Red Rooster
  11. Safari
  12. Settepani
  13. Silvana
  14. Sylvia’s Restaurant
  15. Vinateria
  16. Yatenga French Bistro

WEST HARLEM

  1. Bono Trattoria
  2. Dear Mama (Manhattanville)
  3. Lyn-Genet’s Kitchen
  4. Miss Mamie’s Spoonbread Too
  5. Rai Rai Ken
  6. Tsion Cafe

SOUTH BRONX

  1. Boogie Down Grind
  2. Charlie’s Bar & Kitchen

The specials run from Monday, July 19, to Sunday, August 22. Lunch and dinner options (entrée + one side) are priced at $21 or $39, with options ranging from indoor and outdoor dining, to takeout and delivery.

At restaurants that accept Mastercard, you can also get $10 back (up to $50 total) on each single transaction of $39 or more, when dining on-site and paying with a registered Mastercard. Cardholders can register here.

Sunflowers in East Harlem

Checkout Lydia’s Magic Garden on Park Ave., between 117/118 (east side) where amazing sunflowers are brightening East Harlem.

To learn more about the garden, see:

https://www.facebook.com/lydiasmagicgarden/

National Night Out

The 25th Precinct Community Council is looking for organizations to staff a table at National Night Out on August 3rd. If you would be interested in staffing a table for HNBA, let us know:

Here is the letter from the 25th Precinct Community Council:

Good Evening,
As you know National Night Out is an annual event that happens on the 1st Tuesday of August.  We, unfortunately, were not able to host it last year because of the pandemic.  However, we are looking forward to a fun-filled night this year. 
I’m hoping that you and your organization will participate with us on the evening of August 3rd.  We are asking all organizations and partners to contribute by tabling and possibly supplying a fun activity or game.  Your activity can be for children or adults.  I.E. If you are an organization that specializes in art then you might want to have the kids color/paint National Night Out Logos (This is just an example) or you might want to host a carnival game of some sort or you can support by making an in-kind donation such as Snacks, Hot Dogs for the grill, Hamburgers for the grill, condiments, water, ice, possibly even a bouncy rental for kids, or some other inflatable rental (WE REALLY DO NEED A BOUNCY HOUSE) —(You get my drift) –  But It is totally up to you.  Look, bottom line is- we just want you to hang out with us and help make the day fun.  
If you do plan on participating and have an activity or plan on donating something please email me or text me so that I can put it on our spreadsheet.  
We totally appreciate anything that you can do to help support this night. 
Best Regards,Kioka Jackson and the 25th Precinct Community Council

Racism has determined where people live since colonial times

Racism has always played a role in residential patterns in New York City. When New York City was a Dutch colony, it was just the southern tip of Manhattan. Wall Street got its name from the city’s protective wall.

In 1661, when Black people petitioned the colony for land in the area, they were given land north of the wall, outside of the city proper.

Throughout history, many different practices have shaped racial and residential patterns in New York City. In the 20th century, a practice called redlining made racism a federal policy – with long-lasting repercussions for our housing and our health.

Federal policy drove residential segregation.

In the 1930s, the federal government developed color-coded maps to guide loans to potential home buyers in cities across the U.S.

On these color-coded maps, neighborhoods were divided into 4 categories:

  •  Best
  •  Still desirable
  •  Definitely declining
  •  Hazardous

This classification was clearly rooted in racism, since neighborhood descriptions included statements like:

“Detrimental influences: Infiltration of Negroes. Mixed races.”

The government denied loans to Black and Latino people trying to buy homes in redlined neighborhoods. Instead, these resources went to new White-only suburban communities.

The map below shows how New York City’s neighborhoods were categorized.

This was redlining.

This process became known as “redlining:” systematically denying public and private resources based on where people live, targeting people of color.

Redlining helped drive urban segregation in the 20th century, as new neighborhoods were built for white people while people of color were forced into neighborhoods declared to be “declining.”

Since home ownership is an important way to accrue wealth, redlining drove economic inequality, too – by denying people of color the same opportunities for home ownership that white people had.

East Harlem’s Union Settlement Sues NYC’s Department Of Education

From: Harlem World Magazine

Union Settlement, one of the largest nonprofit early childhood education providers in New York City.

Announced today that it is suing the New York City Department of Education (DOE) to reverse a flawed contract award process that is having a severe adverse impact on young children in East Harlem, as well as their parents and the small businesses that provide early childhood services.

In 2019, DOE issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) to identify organizations to provide early childhood education services throughout New York City.

This included proposals for organizations to operate Family Child Care Networks (FCCNs), which are networks of individuals and small businesses providing child care services in their homes.

Union Settlement has overseen an FCCN for decades, and offered to continue operating that program, overseeing a network of providers serving children ages six weeks old to four years old, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. every weekday, 12 months per year (referred to as “extended day/year” services).

Contrary to the terms of the RFP, DOE instead awarded Union Settlement a contract to serve only 3-year-olds, only until 2:30 p.m. each day, and only during the school year (referred to as “school day/year” services).

This violation of the RFP process harms children, families and providers in six different ways:

  • Children make deep connections with caregivers, and are harmed by continuing changes in caregivers.  Allowing FCCN providers to serve children ages from 6 weeks old to 4 years old creates a multi-year period for the child to be with the same early childhood educator, rather than having one individual up to age 3, another at age 3, and another at age 4.
  • Working parents – particularly single parents – need full-day care for their children and need care 12 months per year.  The “school day/year” model does not work for these parents because they have to make alternative arrangements for their children in the afterschool hours, as well as in July, August and during school holidays.
  • School day/year services are also harmful to children, who as noted above benefit greatly by making strong connections with their caregivers, rather than having to transition to someone new every afternoon and during the summer months.
  • The FCCN providers are small businesses offering early childhood education services in their homes. To be financially viable, those small businesses need to take care of children for the entire day, and they cannot afford to shut down their businesses for two months in the summer, and during the many school holidays.
  • Allowing FCCN providers to care for children from 6 weeks to four years old creates a continuum of care not just for the children, but for the providers as well.  Limiting care to just 3-year-olds forces FCCN providers to recruit an entirely new set of children every year, which again undercuts the financial viability of their businesses.
  • Finally, while providers in wealthier neighborhoods can keep their businesses open by bringing in “private pay” children from wealthier families, this is not an option for FCCN providers in low-income communities of color like East Harlem, where most families do not have the financial means to do so.

The process that DOE used to make the FCCN awards violated the clear language of the rules set forth in the RFP, and Union Settlement has made multiple efforts over the past year to resolve this matter, including proposing resolutions that would eliminate all of the harms noted above, without imposing any additional costs on DOE.

Those efforts were unsuccessful, and Union Settlement has now been forced to sue DOE to prevent these harms from occurring.

“I simply do not understand why DOE wants to force litigation in this matter, where the flaws in the decision-making process are so clear, and there is an easy resolution that benefits the children, families, and caregivers, and that costs DOE nothing,” said David Nocenti, Executive Director of Union Settlement.  “I hope that Chancellor Meisha Porter, who was not involved in the original decisions, will take a hard look at this and decide to take action to benefit the children, families and small businesses here in East Harlem.”

“Our goal is to prepare community members to establish and run their own home-based child care businesses which provide a safe and caring learning environment for children,” said Denise Ramos, Union Settlement’s Interim Director of Early Childhood Education. “My heart goes out to the providers, parents, and children who are caught in the middle of this unfair situation that can be easily remedied without cost to DOE.”

“I only have one child enrolled in my program and I usually have six to seven kids.  I am struggling to pay my monthly rent of $3,800, and I was recently served a court order due to my inability to pay because my income is reduced,” said Maria Martinez, a Family Child Care Network provider. “I have successfully operated my child care business for 16 years which allowed me to provide for myself and my sons.  If the DOE does not change the award so I’m able to enroll more children, I will be forced to close my child care business.”

“I am worried about losing my job in retail because I am only able to work limited hours because I don’t have anyone to care for my son after 2:30pm,” said Wendy Diaz, an East Harlem parent.  “As a single mom, I can’t afford to pay the provider out-of-pocket and don’t have anyone else to take care of my son in the afternoons or during the summer when no care is available.”

“DOE’s failure to amend the award is adversely impacting East Harlem, one of the poorest neighborhoods in New York, as it tries to overcome the longstanding health and economic disparities it has always faced, and that have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Mr. Nocenti. “Amending the award will benefit East Harlem children and parents, because this community needs extended-day, extended-year care for children of all ages, and also will benefit the FCCN providers, who need to stay solvent and feed their own families.”

Union Settlement is an on-the-ground resource for East Harlem residents of all ages, and a passionate advocate for the needs of underserved communities.

Established in 1895, Union Settlement provides a broad array of education, wellness and community-building programs to over 10,000 East Harlem residents each year, including early childhood education, afterschool and summer youth programs, college preparation, job readiness, English language classes, behavioral health counseling, small business assistance, senior centers, Meals on Wheels and more.

For more information about Union Settlement, visit www.unionsettlement.org.

No Air Conditioning

The New Woman Behind the Camera at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Met has a great exhibit of women photographers that just opened. Among the photographers is Lucy Ashjian who made a number of great photographs of dancers at The Savoy in the 1930’s:

For more on the exhibit, see:

https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2021/new-woman-behind-the-camera

Walking Distance to a Park

How Calculated: 

A map of “walk-to-a-park service areas” from the NYC Parks Department was overlayed onto a map of 2017 population estimates by census tract to calculate the percentage of the population that potentially live within the service area. These percentages were aggregated up to a neighborhood level.

Source: New York City Department of Parks and Recreation,New York City DOHMH population estimates, modified from US Census Bureau inter-censal population estimates

Manhattan 11 DSNY Garage Moving to East 127th Street

The equipment parked and stored at the decrepit garage on 1st Avenue will all move to East 127th Street in the next year or so. The new facility that is being built across from the Proton Center and between 2nd and 3rd Avenues will be open air.

Where Did Eric Adams Campaign

The City newspaper has tabulated the 800 campaign stops that Adams, Kathryn Garcia, Maya Wiley and Andrew Yang made around the five boroughs between April Fools’ Day and Primary Day. After months of seemingly endless online forums, the location of these campaign stops is fascinating and tells you a lot about who they saw as their constituency.

In the map below, you can see Eric Adams’ campaign stops and note the heavy uptown/Harlem numbers:

The circle with the “3” is at the National Action Network headquarters, the “2” is near Columbia Presbyterian Hospital.

In this detailed screenshot of upper Manhattan, you can see where Eric Adams campaigned in our community:

As Adams’ campaign staff notes:

Adams grew up in South Jamaica, and voters in the area are exactly the type of constituency he was hoping to attract: Black homeowners who “are active in civic life and deeply concerned about public safety and motivated in this election by serious concern about the decline of the city,” Thies said.

To see the full article, and the interactive maps, see:

https://www.thecity.nyc/2021/7/14/22578035/mapping-nyc-mayoral-campaign-stops

Jazzmobile on Wednesday Evening

A fantastic concert with Jay Hoggard:

https://jayhoggard.com/