CUNY’s East Harlem Restaurant Guide

CUNY has come up with a somewhat pedantic restaurant guide for East Harlem.

They’ve covered most of the bases, but oddly have some restaurants that haven’t been open for 2 years now and others are located firmly in Central Harlem. It seems surprising that they didn’t check whether or not the restaurants were still in business, and you wonder if they really know the geography of East Harlem?

Nevertheless, it’s worth checking out to see if some of your old favorites are there, or if something new worth checking out is listed:

https://www.nycfoodpolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/East-Harlem-Restaurant-Guide-2022-2023.pdf

City College Postcard

Ebay has a postcard of City College, with eye popping color and wonderful framing under a gothic arch.

The request (to South Dakota) to exchange postcards, is charming:

EH in PS1

The current show at MOMA’s PS1 – Greater New York – has a number of Harlem artists/images on display. One particularly great collection is a wall of photos from Hiram Maristany, who filmed the unrest and revolution in East Harlem during the Young Lords Era of 1969-70.

Maristany was born in East Harlem and became the official photographer of the Young Lords Party (founded in 1969). His photos of dental clinics, TB testing trucks, the Garbage Offensive, and the takeover of the United Methodist Church (Lex/111), have become the images of this period that captured the frustration, anger, spirit, and pride of the Puerto Rican residents of East Harlem.

The work will be up (in LIC, Queens) until April.

New Building – Park Avenue between 126/127

If you’ve been on Park Avenue above Metro-North you may have seen excavation underway for a new residential building. The building will be 18 stories, face Park Avenue, and have a couple of floors of commercial space below. Artimus is the general contractor.

Harlem and Sugar Hill as Seen Through Postcards

Join the Municipal Art Society on Thursday for a talk about Harlem and Sugar Hill as seen through the lens of turn of the 20th century postcards:

A Man Is Known By the Candy He Sends

A commercial postcard came across my radar recently.

Shuylers Candy Store was located at 150 West 125th Street where the Adam Clayton Powell State Building now stands. Note the rounded glass display cases.

America Day Nursery

This postcard from East Harlem – 354 East 121st Street – shows a day nursery with a somewhat teetering Christmas tree.

The location is now in the midst of Wagner Houses,

Harlem Postcards

Every year the Studio Museum in Harlem celebrates our community as a beacon of African-American history and culture. The Studio Museum, along with other cultural landmarks such as the Apollo Theater, Abyssinian Baptist Church, and Malcolm X Corner, at 125th Street and Seventh Avenue, serve as popular postcard images for visitors and residents.  

The Studio Museum’s Harlem Postcards, an ongoing project, invites contemporary artists of diverse backgrounds to reflect on Harlem as a site of cultural activity, political vitality, and creative production. The resulting images reflect each artist’s oeuvre with an idiosyncratic snapshot taken in, or representative of, this historic locale.  

Each photograph in Harlem Postcards: Winter 2020—21 is available as a digital postcard to be downloaded for free and shared.

This season, featured artists include María Berrío, Ruben Natal-San Miguel, Robert Pruitt, and Summer Wheat. 

Covid Relief Available

Applications have reopened for NYS’s COVID-19 Rent Relief program. If you lost income from 4/1/20-7/31/20 visit hcr.ny.gov/rrp for more information. Deadline to apply is 2/1/21.

For more info, contact [email protected] or 1-833-499-0318.

See original post:

https://twitter.com/nysenbenjamin/status/1341797718843248641?s=21

Mount Morris Park

Here are 3 great photos of Marcus Garvey Park (formerly Mount Morris Park) from Columbia University’s collection of images.

Below is a postcard from 1905 on the east side of the park, looking south towards where the basketball courts are today:

Mount Morris Park was renamed in honor of Marcus Garvey in 1973, the park was built largely as a green space for Boss Tweed’s Tammany Hall cronies, many of whom lived uptown by the 1860s.

Below is a postcard sent in 1916 after an ocean voyage:

The land for the park had been purchased by the city in 1839, but landscaping was long delayed. Its design was eventually supervised by Ignaz A. Pilat, who would later serve as an able associate of Frederick Law Olmsted during the creation of Central Park.

This final image is of the bandstand, and was sent in 1907:

To see the collection:

https://dlc.library.columbia.edu/durst/cul:jh9w0vt4h9