Don’t Want Guns In Our Community?

Celebrate Alternate Side Parking

Who knew?

While everyone, even disgruntled drivers, acknowledges that the return to twice a week alternate side parking reduces the trash on our streets, reduces the rat population, and adds to community pride, who knew that it also impacts the presence of guns in our community?

While alternate side parking may seem like an annoyance to those who own cars, but all New Yorkers want cleaner streets. To that end, DSNY’s mechanical brooms are the best tool to clean the most trash, filth, and feces. As DSNY says, “We just want people to follow the law so that we can get the streets clean.”

And those street sweepers? Their mechanical brooms can pick up to 1,500 pounds of trash each go-around. And cleaner communities are safer communities.

The Amsterdam News reports that:

“Some of the spaces I’ve seen [trash is] overwhelming, to the point where you can’t even vaguely consider using the space, because of overgrowth of vegetation and the accumulation of trash—small trash items become massive trash items, they’ll become abandoned cars, and abandoned appliances and abandoned furniture,” said Dr. Charles Branas, chair of epidemiology at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. “So to the extent that that can be changed, that’s a real structural change of benefit to communities that brings people closer to their local spaces in their neighborhood and to each other, which lead to all kinds of benefits down the road.”

Branas refers to it as the “busy streets theory,” a counter to the “broken windows theory” that argues that bustling neighborhoods indicate safety and comfort for the locals. Clean streets play a part in encouraging residents to leave their homes to participate in community efforts.

Additionally, Branas mentioned the practice of alternate side parking could potentially offer an inadvertent byproduct for flushing out illegal firearm stashing.

“[In] a couple of the studies we did, one of the mechanisms for the storage of illegal guns is to park a car—often an abandoned car as well—in front of abandoned buildings or lots, and to put illegal firearms in that car,” he said. “So to the extent that you can regularly move that car, there’s opportunities to also disrupt illegal guns in neighborhoods.”

To see the full article, click here.

The Moth at The Schomburg

The Moth x Daughters of the Movement
Date and Time
Tuesday, August 9, 2022, 7 – 8:30 PM
End times are approximate. Events may end early or late.
Location

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
Fully accessible to wheelchairs
Free Event
Register
Event Details
Tinted headshots of Gina Belafonte, Hasna Muhammad, Dominique Sharpton and Suzanne Kay.

Join us for an evening of storytelling and conversation with The Moth, featuring Gina Belafonte, Suzanne Kay, Hasna Muhammad, and Dominique Sharpton.

ABOUT THIS EVENT | IN-PERSON

The Moth is true stories, told live and without notes. Gina Belafonte (daughter of Harry Belafonte), Suzanne Kay (daughter of Diahann Carroll), Hasna Muhammad (daughter of Ossie Davis & Ruby Dee), and Dominique Sharpton (daughter of Al Sharpton) are Daughters of the Movement. They represent a group of women who sat at the feet of those who were on the front lines of the Civil Rights Movement. They carry the oral history, cultural values and wisdom passed down to them by some of the revolutionary leaders who turned the tide of American history. Join us at the Schomburg Center for an evening of Moth-style storytelling and a conversation illustrating a legacy of sisterhood.

PARTICIPANTS |

Artivist Gina Belafonte is the Executive Director of Sankofa.org a non-profit which educates, motivates, and activates artists and allies in service of grassroots movements and equitable change. An award-winning producer, director, and cultural organizer, Gina is driven by the most urgent social and political issues of our time using art as a tool to fulfill the mission of Sankofa.org. As a visiting professor, lecturer, and public speaker, Gina works with diverse artists, activists, and organizations worldwide to promote cultural and civic engagement and has assisted in mobilizing one of the largest cultural gatherings of artists in the world.

Suzanne Kay is a writer and filmmaker currently working on a documentary about her mother, the late actress Diahann Carroll, among other projects. She produced and co-wrote a feature film, Cape of Good Hope, which won numerous awards and nominations, including Honorable Mention for the People’s Choice Award at the Toronto International Film Festival, National Board of Review, and NAACP Image Awards. She has been published in Huffington Post, the Southampton Review and BigCityLit.

Hasna Muhammad is a visual artist, writer, and educator whose work focuses on family, social justice, and the human condition. As an advocate for education as justice, Hasna provides professional preparation for executive leadership, diversity management, and community engagement for the purpose of diversifying educational and political leadership forces. Hasna was a 2018-2019 Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture Fellow.

Dominique Sharpton is an actress, producer, and activist. As the National Director of Membership for National Action Network, one of the nation’s oldest legacy civil rights organizations with more than 100 chapters and 40,000 members across the country, Dominique works to activate and engage the next generation of community activists and impact systemic change through local community development. She also produces live cultural events to activate and inspire change.

The Moth is true stories, told live and without notes. We celebrate the ability of true, personal storytelling to illuminate both the diversity and commonality of human experience. Our work allows people all over the world and from all walks of life: astronauts, students, a dental hygienist, a hotdog eating champion, a mechanic, exonerated prisoners, veterans, Nobel laureates and everyone in between, to share their stories on stage in front of a live audience. Through live and virtual shows, storytelling workshops, a podcast, Peabody Award-winning Radio Hour, and The New York Times best-selling books, The Moth brings the power of personal storytelling to millions of people each year—creating community and building empathy around the world.


PUBLIC NOTICE AND DISCLAIMER

IN-PERSON | By registering for this event, you are acknowledging that an inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. By attending an in-person program at The New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, you voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19 and agree not to hold The New York Public Library, its Trustees, officers, agent and employees liable for any illness or injury. If you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19 or suspect you have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive, please stay home.

FIRST COME, FIRST SEATED | Events are free and open to all, but due to space constraints registration is requested. Registered guests are given priority check-in 15 to 30 minutes before start time. After the event starts all registered seats are released regardless of registration, so we recommend that you arrive early.

GUESTS | Please note that holding seats in the Langston Hughes Auditorium is strictly prohibited and there is no food or drinks allowed anywhere in the Schomburg Center.

AUDIO/VIDEO RECORDING | Programs are photographed and recorded by the Schomburg Center. Attending this event indicates your consent to being filmed/photographed and your consent to the use of your recorded image for any all purposes of the New York Public Library.

Getting Rid of Stuff

DSNY wants us all to:

  • Buy less stuff
  • Donate/give it to someone who’d use it
  • Recycle it
  • Throw it out responsibly

And, to accomplish this, they’ve produced a pamphlet highlighting what can be recycled, composted, and donated.

On their website ‘how to get rid of…’ you can type in the thing you’d like to get rid of, and the engine will return suggestions. Here’s what you get when you type in “books”

https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/howtogetridof/books

Here’s the latest list of what can be recycled, and what shouldn’t:

Metal (all kinds)
metal cans (soup, pet food, empty aerosol cans, empty paint cans, etc.)
aluminum foil and foil products (wrap and trays)
metal caps and lids
household metal items (wire hangers, pots, tools, curtain rods, small appliances that are mostly metal, certain vehicle license plates, etc.)
bulky metal items (large metal items, such as furniture, cabinets, large mostly metal appliances, DOES NOT INCLUDE electronic devices banned from disposal)

Glass
glass bottles and jars ONLY

Plastic (rigid plastics)
plastic bottles, jugs, and jars
rigid plastic caps and lids
rigid plastic food containers (yogurt, deli, hummus, dairy tubs, cookie tray inserts, “clamshell” containers, other rigid plastic take-out containers)
rigid plastic non-food containers (such as “blister-pack” and “clamshell” consumer packaging, acetate boxes)
rigid plastic housewares (flower pots, mixing bowls, plastic appliances, etc.)
bulk rigid plastic (crates, buckets, pails, furniture, large toys, large appliances, etc.)
Note:  Rigid plastic is any item that is mostly plastic resin—it is relatively inflexible and maintains its shape or form when bent.

Cartons
Food and beverage cartons
Drink boxes
Aseptic packaging (holds beverages and food: juice, milk and non-dairy milk products, soup, etc.)

Paper
newspapers, magazines, catalogs, phone books, mixed paper
white and colored paper (lined, copier, computer; staples are ok)
mail and envelopes (any color; window envelopes are ok)
receipts
paper bags (handles ok)
wrapping paper
soft-cover books (phone books, paperbacks, comics, etc.; no spiral bindings) (schools should follow their school  book recycling procedures)

Cardboard
cardboard egg cartons
cardboard trays
smooth cardboard (food and shoe boxes, gift boxes, tubes, file folders, cardboard from product packaging)
pizza boxes (remove and discard soiled liner; recycle little plastic supporter with rigid plastics)
paper cups (waxy lining ok if cups are empty and clean; recycle plastic lids with rigid plastics)
corrugated cardboard boxes (flattened and tied together with sturdy twine)

Not Accepted
Batteries
“Tanglers” (such as cables, wires, cords, hoses)
Electronic devices banned from disposal
Paper with heavy wax or plastic coating (candy wrappers, take-out and freezer containers, etc.)
Soiled or soft paper (napkins, paper towels, tissues)
Hardcover books (schools should follow their school  book recycling procedures)
Printer cartridges
Glass items other than glass bottles and jars (such as mirrors, light bulbs, ceramics, and glassware)
Window blinds
Foam plastic items (such as foam food service containers, cups and trays, foam protective packing blocks, and, and foam packing peanuts)
Flexible plastic items (such as single-serve food and drink squeezable pouches and tubes such as toothpaste, lotion, cosmetics, or sports balls such as basketballs, bowling balls, soccer balls, footballs, yoga balls)
Film plastic (such as plastic shopping bags and wrappers.) Bring plastic bags and film to participating stores for recycling
Cigarette lighters and butane gas lighters
Cassette and VHS tapes
CDs and DVDs
Pens and markers
Rigid plastic containers containing medical “sharps” or disposable razors
Containers that held dangerous or corrosive chemicals

To keep up to date with all things trashy, go to nyc.gov/dsnynews

Marcus Garvey

Uptown Grand Central

Wanna talk trash with us? The NYC Department of Sanitation will roll with resources for a community cleanup this Saturday, July 30, from 12-2 p.m.

DSNY will bring their van full of brooms, trashcans and trash-pickers 
— and we’ll have the chance to not only pitch in, but talk trashcans and basket collection with Deputy Speaker Diana Ayala. Plus learn about needle pickup & the new needle pickup hotline (718-415-3708) with the New York Harm Reduction Educators (NYHRE).

We’ll also have unlimited cold drinks on hand! Click here to register

Mural Unveiling

Join Mattaya and the Hi-ARTS community on August 5, 2022 from 12-3 pm for the Reveal and Celebration of Musa as well as a Planting Workshop with artist Tasha Dougé.

This July we welcomed Mattaya Fitts as our inaugural ONE WALL MOVEMENT muralist. All month she worked on Musa,a mural that now adorns Cherry Tree Park in Harlem, NY.
Free & open to the public. Just show up!

Musa Reveal & Celebration 
August 5, 12-3 pm

Planting Workshop with Tasha Dougé
1:30-3 pm

 A creative planting and community intention setting exercise curated by Tasha Dougé. Tasha Dougé is a Bronx-based, Haitian-infused artist, artivist and cultural vigilante. Her body of work activates conversations around women empowerment, health advocacy, sexual education, societal “norms,” identity and Black community pride.

Workshop capacity is limited to 20 participants. No registration necessary.

Free & open to the public. Just show up!

“At a time when much feels heavy and uncertain, I am interested in conveying themes of personal growth, rest, joy, and transformation. This mural addresses self-care as an extension of community care.” @mattayafitts

Wilfredo Lopez – Candidate for Assembly District 68

Wilfredo Lopez has come to a couple of our HNBA meetings and had mentioned that CB11 (East Harlem) does not get the same amount of funding for DSNY concerns that the community district south of 96th Street does.

Wilfedo brought this up, and subsequently sent over the document that proves his point:

The link to the budget document is below as well as a screenshot of the relevant page (p. 213).

https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/omb/downloads/pdf/cbgeo6-20.pdf

Wilfredo points out that the document (above) shows that East Harlem (Sanitation District 11) receives less than half the budget for sanitation services than nearby wealthier neighborhoods like the Upper East Side (Sanitation District 8) or the Upper West Side (Sanitation District 7). 

DSNY Replies

Brooklyn, NY – June 7 2016: DSNY workers collect trash on a city street. New York Department of Sanitation is responsible for garbage and recycling collection, street cleaning, and snow removal.

After our HNBA meeting, DSNY replied to the issue that it spends more DSNY money on the Upper East Side more than it does in East Harlem:

I apologize for the delay in following up from the meeting last week.

There was a question regarding funding allocation within Community Board 11 as compared to other districts (specifically CB 8).

Correct, there is a funding difference because of the amount of service needed.

For example, CB11 has 80.8 total miles of ASP (including metered blocks) compared to CB8 that has 123.9 miles (including metered blocks).

CB11 has 70 total personnel assigned to the garbage, while CB8 has 140.

I hope this information is helpful.

Please let me know if anyone else in the group has questions.

I am always available to you all.

Thank you

  • Marissa Yanni 
  • Community Affairs Liaison
  • Bureau of Community Affairs
  • NYC Department of Sanitation
  • Office: 646-885-4575
  • Mobile: 646-841-4250
    [email protected]

HNBA’s May 2022 Meeting Zoom Recording

https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/cLbu_iLOpWEwXh7o94hSeT6WikwW6EpN7zuOOwSbeRprOQ1zCoSw0hBnWrjzePz_.1OilUMAA3hAgS4vo
Passcode: @y9zb=5f

Curbside Composting

Curbside Composting is coming back — in a new way! DSNY will collect food scraps, food-soiled paper, and yard waste and turn it into compost or renewable energy. This free service is voluntary, and residents must sign up.

Eligibility

The program is open to residential buildings of all sizes in all parts of Harlem.

Sign Up and Stay Informed

Sign-up is now open! We will notify you when service will start in your area. If you do not live in an area where the service is yet offered, we will let you know about opportunities to bring your food scraps to a drop-off location or how to compost at home (and will let you know if service is expanding to your area!).

We want to hear from everyone interested in Curbside Composting as it helps us make the case to expand this service to more neighborhoods.

Apartment Buildings

Multi-unit apartment buildings must have management approval. Ask your building management or board members to sign up. If you are in an eligible neighborhood, we will notify the building representative when service will start in your area.

Service

Curbside Composting service will resume this fall on a rolling basis based on the number of sign ups in each neighborhood. This way we can ensure there will be enough material set out for our trucks to pick up.

The more sign-ups in your area, the quicker service will start!

Brown Bins

If you do not have a DSNY-issued brown bin, you can request one when you sign up and we will deliver it before your service begins.

Why Compost?

Composting keeps our neighborhoods clean and healthy! Food scraps, food-soiled paper and yard waste make up a third of the trash New Yorkers throw away. Our brown bins have latching lids that make it harder for rodents and pests to get to your food waste. It’s much easier for them to rip open a bag at the curb.
The finished compost made from your food and yard waste nourishes our soil for healthier parks and gardens.
Composting makes our city more sustainable—we can reduce waste sent to landfills and create clean, renewable energy to heat or power homes.
What Goes in the Brown Bin

ALL FOOD WASTE including:

coffee grounds and tea bags
shells (seafood, nut, and egg)
bones
spoiled and expired food
food soiled paper (napkins, towels, uncoated plates, bags, trays, boxes)
Yard and Plant Waste including:

leaves
spent flowers and trimmings
small twigs
grass clippings
BPI approved compostable items.

DO NOT put in:

Trash of any kind including:
diapers and hygienic products
animal waste
wrappers and packaging
foam products
Recyclables including:
metal
glass
rigid plastic
beverage cartons
clean recyclable paper
cardboard

Spread the word!

Help us inform New Yorkers about curbside composting by sharing digital content (social media posts, sample text for newsletters, and graphics) from our Make Compost, Not Trash website.

HNBA Meeting Video

https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/DeyFmIVrkvQSZtaBdxZ5gRSheeSy4GBMnHBhtfQTiFPI7wvrfk5-cZnWZeL5K1g.ioN3s5Ur0LlWRQkP

(Passcode: Oby1D#7f)

Waiting to Open

A photograph from October 1977 recently came on Ebay. The scene is a corner of Lenox Avenue and 124th Street, where a line of men awaits entry into a liquor store.

Here is the back of the print.

The location is now the home of Harlem Shake. Note how the liquors sign on the corner of the building, remains:

Trash Talk

The City has an article about the DSNY garage at 99th Street and the stop-gap, open-air new location on East 127th Street:

https://www.thecity.nyc/2021/9/28/22695132/east-harlem-waiting-for-long-term-trash-fix-four-years-after-de-blasio-pledge

Sign-Up for Composting

One of our neighbors next to Marcus Garvey Park writes:

I urge everyone to sign up for curbside composting. Our building enjoyed this great service from November 2018 till March 2020 when the pandemic shut down the program. The DSNY is gearing back up. However they need you you to sign-up for this fantastic program.

For those compost-curious, DSNY’s program will accept – keeping this out of landfill

ALL FOOD WASTE including:

  • coffee grounds and tea bags
  • shells (seafood, nut, and egg)
  • bones
  • spoiled and expired food
  • food soiled paper (napkins, towels, uncoated plates, bags, trays, boxes)

Yard and Plant Waste including:

  • leaves
  • spent flowers and trimmings
  • small twigs
  • grass clippings

Sign-up is now open! If you are in an eligible neighborhood, we will notify you when service will start in your area. If you do not live in an area where the service is yet offered, we will let you know about opportunities to bring your food scraps to a drop-off location or how to compost at home (and will let you know if service is expanding to your area!).

We want to hear from everyone interested in Curbside Composting as it helps us make the case to expand this service to more neighborhoods.

https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/dsny/site/services/food-scraps-and-yard-waste-page/overview-residents-organics

White Park

White Park – 106/Lex – has a great basketball mural facing the courts.

Cesar Fantauzzi became the most prominent player in Spanish Harlem, where he earned his nickname “Spanish Doc” after capturing a jump shot attempt in midair. Fantauzzi entered the BSN with the Atléticos de San Germán earning a reputation as a power dunker and shot blocker, eventually following the footsteps of the other prominent Nuyoricans into the national basketball team.

MMPCIA Meeting on Tuesday Night – Safety

General Membership Meeting

Tuesday, September 28th, 6:30PM

Community Safety

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86847234917

Sugar Hill Music Festival on Saturday

Location

Sugar Hill Luminaries Lawn

Highbridge Park

155th Street and Edgecombe Avenue

Harlem, NY 10032

Spring Clean-Up, Today!

Got the itch to do some spring cleaning? Then meet up with Uptown Grand Central TODAY to spring clean on a massive scale.

TODAY Saturday, April 10, marks the kick-off of Uptown’s spring cleaning season, with the first of our warm-weather community clean-ups along the East 125th Street corridor. We’re glad to be doing it in partnership with the Sanitation Foundation (who, yes! know a thing or two about trash)!

It’s also the NYPD’s Graffiti Clean-Up Day (so we’ll be brushing up some artwork as well) and the beautification day for Art In the Park (in case you have a green thumb).

We’ll meet up at noon in the Uptown community space under the tracks at 125th Street & Park Avenue. Gloves, brooms and other supplies will be provided, so sign up here to help us get a headcount! Social distancing will be enforced. And most likely there’ll be snacks.

1987

Big hair. Twin Towers.

Jobs!

City Cleanup Corps is Hiring

The City Cleanup Corps (NYC CCC) will employ 10,000 New Yorkers for beautification across our city. NYC CCC workers will wipe away graffiti, powerwash sidewalks, create community murals, tend to community gardens, beautify public spaces, and work with community organizations to clean their neighborhoods.

Available Job Opportunities

Rally for Nurses Today

Got the Itch?

Got the itch to do some spring cleaning? Then meet up with Uptown Grand Central this weekend to spring clean on a massive scale.

This Saturday, April 10, marks the kick-off of Uptown’s spring cleaning season, with the first of our warm-weather community clean-ups along the East 125th Street corridor. We’re glad to be doing it in partnership with the Sanitation Foundation (who, yes! know a thing or two about trash)!

It’s also the NYPD’s Graffiti Clean-Up Day (so we’ll be brushing up some artwork as well) and the beautification day for Art In the Park (in case you have a green thumb).

We’ll meet up at noon in the Uptown community space under the tracks at 125th Street & Park Avenue. Gloves, brooms and other supplies will be provided, so sign up here to help us get a headcount! Social distancing will be enforced. And most likely there’ll be snacks.

Where Does My Sewage Go?

Quick. Do you know where your sinks, bathtubs, showers, and toilets eventually empty? For most of us in Harlem, our sewage waste goes to Wards Island to the sewage treatment plant that was built in the 1940’s in the shadow of the Hellgate Bridge.

A 2013 plan to upgrade the facility is ongoing, but since the Public Works Administration built the Wards Island plant, your sewage flows (in a pipe) under the East River to Wards Island where in 8 hours, the solids are removed, the liquid cleaned, and the resulting clean water is put into the East River.

In the map above, any drain or toilet in the purple area, eventually gets to Wards Island.

Please note that you should never believe that anything labeled ‘flushable’ is indeed flushable. Do not put it in the toilet. Place it in a garbage can and take it out with the solid waste.

COVID-19 Positivity and Vaccination Rates for Harlem

From Patch.com:

https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/1ZvOB/2/

Hover over a Zip Code or click on a line to focus on that particular data.

Nick Garber from Patch.com has information on our community and the vaccine:

Latest Harlem vaccine data

  • 10026 – Central Harlem (South): 34 percent received one dose, 20 percent fully vaccinated
  • 10027 – Central Harlem (South)/Morningside Heights/West Harlem: 33 percent received one dose, 19 percent fully vaccinated
  • 10029 – East Harlem: 36 percent received one dose, 22 percent fully vaccinated
  • 10030 – Central Harlem (North): 28 percent received one dose, 16 percent fully vaccinated
  • 10031 – Hamilton Heights/West Harlem: 34 percent received one dose, 21 percent fully vaccinated
  • 10035 – East Harlem: 39 percent received one dose, 23 percent fully vaccinated
  • 10037 – Central Harlem (North)/East Harlem: 32 percent received one dose, 20 percent fully vaccinated
  • 10039 – Central Harlem (North)/Washington Heights (South): 27 percent received one dose, 16 percent fully vaccinated

M11 DSNY Depot Coming

The M11 DSNY depot is coming to 127th Street at the Potamkin site. Site clearing has been done, and the project is underway.

Note that M10 (Central Harlem) already park their trucks under the Metro North Tracks, between 130-132. Our neighborhood will have two open air DSNY lots. Other, wealthier communities have combined, and enclosed facilities even though our community has some of the highest childhood asthma rates in the city.

We need Council Member Diana Ayala to fight for the funding for a consolidated, enclosed DSNY depot.

NYC Now Has a Vaccine Tracker

To see the live version: https://public.tableau.com/views/COVID-19VaccinationTracker/Geography?:language=en&:display_count=y&:origin=viz_share_link

Black Businesses

Plenty to celebrate during both Black History Month and all year long:

Head to Uptown Grand Central’s Small Business Guidethen Listings or Map, then select “Black-Owned” as your detail. More than 100 restaurants, retail, barbershops/salons and fitness/wellness businesses will pop up. You can also search by “Historic,” to find businesses that have been around for 25 years or more (such as our own Omo Sade Skincare, above).

Have a business to add? This guide was built for our community, so email UGC at [email protected].