HARLEM WEEK 2020

FROM SUNDAY, AUGUST 16 TO SUNDAY, AUGUST 23

What originally started as a one-day tribute to one of the most culturally rich neighborhoods in the world has now become a month-long celebration enjoying its 46th year. Recognizing this year, 2020 is unlike we have ever seen HARLEM WEEK this year will take place from August 16 – 23 and it will take place virtually. For many years people have planned their vacations around the dates HARLEM WEEK to travel to Harlem to participate in our festival. This year HARLEM WEEK goes to the world as a virtual event sharing the culture, history, resilience and strength of Harlem.

Upcoming Events

AUG165:00 AM – 11:59 PMSupport Harlem Now Virtual Harlem 5K Run Honoring Percy 100 and Charles Rangel 90

The traditional Harlem 5k Run will this year be a virtual event taking place throughout HARLEM WEEK 2020!AUG165:01 AM – 11:59 PMVirtual Exhibitor Vendor Village

Shop, get information, win prizes, get free gifts when you visit the HARLEM WEEK Virtual Exhibitor Vendor village. Shop with local businesses from around the world and visit with reps from Fortune 500 corporations. The HARLEM WEEK Virtual Exhibitor Vendor village has something for everyoneAUG166:00 AM – 11:59 AMHARLEM WEEK/Imagenation Film Festival

Enjoy Films that speak to our HARLEM WEEK Theme of “Movement of The People”, celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the Negro Baseball League and the 100th Anniversary of the Harlem Renaissance.AUG1610:00 AM – 11:00 AMChildren’s Corner

Parents, have your kids join us each morning of HARLEM WEEK in the Children’s Corner. Our daily space just for kids up to age 12. Youngsters can enjoy book reading, performances, cooking classes (done with adult supervision) and more.AUG1611:00 AM – 12:00 PMDance Workshop Presented by NJPAC

Every day during HARLEM WEEK take time to dance, move and groove with us and our partners at New Jersey Performing Arts Center with special guest instructors .AUG163:00 PM – 7:00 PMA Great Day In Harlem

Join us online and celebrate A Great Day In Harlem, featuring performances and appearances from local, national and international performing artists including Hezekiah Walker, Erica Campbell, Dance Theater of Harlem, The Harlem Music Festival All Star Band led by Ray Chew and much more!AUG167:00 PM – 7:10 PMA Taste Of Harlem

Harlem has some of the worlds most iconic restaurants and we invite you to experience them virtually throughout HARLEM WEEK 2020. See how some of the mouth watering dishes and delicious beverages are made, join us and enjoy “A Taste of Harlem.”AUG175:00 AM – 11:59 PMSupport Harlem Now Virtual Harlem 5K Run Honoring Percy100 and Charles Rangel 90

The traditional Harlem 5k Run will this year be a virtual event taking place throughout HARLEM WEEK 2020!AUG175:01 AM – 11:59 PMVirtual Exhibitor Vendor Village

Shop, get information, win prizes, get free gifts when you visit the HARLEM WEEK Virtual Exhibitor Vendor village. Shop with local businesses from around the world and visit with reps from Fortune 500 corporations. The HARLEM WEEK Virtual Exhibitor Vendor village has something for everyoneAUG176:00 AM – 11:59 AMHARLEM WEEK/Imagenation Film Festival

Enjoy Films that speak to our HARLEM WEEK Theme of “Movement of The People”, celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the Negro Baseball League and the 100th Anniversary of the Harlem Renaissance.SEE FULL CALENDAR

Kamala Harris in Harlem

Marcus Samuelsson recently Tweeted this about meeting Kamala and added in a photo of her in Harlem in 1966:

Marcus [email protected]I recently met @kamalaharris at @RoosterHarlem and am proud and hopeful for her leadership. When I look at this photo of her as a young child visiting Harlem in ‘66 I hope all the boys and girls in our community see themselves in her and realize the heights they can achieve.

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HNBA and Greater Harlem Coalition Member Interviewed

Yesterday a neighbor and HNBA member was interviewed to present her (and Harlem’s) perspective on how the Upper West Side seems to have gotten its knickers in a twist about homeless men living in their community:

https://www.nbcnewyork.com/investigations/nypd-responds-to-hotels-for-homeless-on-the-upper-west-side/2560908/

The Harlem Neighborhood Block Association seeks an equitable and fair share distribution of homeless services and shelters throughout all communities in New York City and all 5 boroughs.

Advancing Black Entrepreneurs in the COVID Era

Chase for Business has a program they would like to promote in our community: Advancing Black Entrepreneurs. If you know any Black entreprenures who would benefit from a free education program designed to help Black business owners recover and move forward in the wake of the current global pandemic.

Advancing Black Entrepreurs is a collaboration between Chase for Business and: Black Enterprise, National Urban League and the US Black Chambers, Inc. They’ve developed a series of information-sessions – the first of which focuses on Reclaiming the Future: How Your Business Can Rise to the Challenges of COVID-19.

This ninety-minute guided digital session, offered at no cost, will cover topics including:

  • The increasing importance of bookkeeping
  • Pivoting your business model in this new economic environment
  • Helping your customers feel confident and safe
  • Developing contingency plans for the future
Register Now

Skyrise for Harlem

It looks like a collection of nuclear cooling towers, suddenly plopped into Harlem, but June Jordan’s plan for a redevelopment of Harlem in the early 1960s was for a collection of conical high rises:

Esquire Magazine had the (above layout) which was recently featured in an article in The New Yorker.

The conical towers would have concentrated a huge number of residents in towers that would have dwarfed even the larger Harlem and East Harlem projects that you can see in the image (above).

June Jordan (portrait)

June Jordan (the architect pictured above), sought to throw:

herself into what she called “a collaborative architectural redesign of Harlem,” in which she joined forces with the architect R. Buckminster Fuller, champion of the geodesic dome. Jordan and Fuller called their collaboration “Skyrise for Harlem”: a plan for public housing that was attuned to the well-being of two hundred and fifty thousand of the neighborhood’s residents, most of them Black. The project may have seemed a left turn for Jordan, who came to prominence through her essays and poetry. But she had always conceived of her work as falling under the umbrella of environmental design—“that is,” she explained, “in general, an effort to contribute to the positive changing of the world.”

While C. L. Davis II, from Buffalo, NY questions whether or not June Jordan can be classified as an architect in Race and Architecture: https://raceandarchitecture.com/2013/11/26/writing-and-building-black-utopianism-representing-the-architextural-musings-of-june-jordans-his-own-where-1971/, her bold proposal clearly situated her work in the Le Corbusier > Robert Moses > Buckminster Fuller school of slum clearance > towers in the park, school:

Note the scale of the brownstones and tenaments below one of the towers, sectionally represented.

Jordan believed that the grid pattern was responsible for high crime rates, and that The Commissioners’ Plan was “pathological crucification.” [Fish, C. (2007). Place, Emotion, and Environmental Justice in Harlem: June Jordan and Buckminster Fuller’s 1965 “Architextual” Collaboration. Discourse].

Fuller and Jordan’s “Skyrise” never made it off the pages of Esquire. The ARCH plan for the East Harlem Triangle was never adopted, though Goldstein argues that it did lead the way for residents to build “a social service center and hundreds of affordable housing units in the following years.” Without any radical reconstruction, most of Harlem foundered, the area’s real estate prices plummeting in the 1970s as in so many other economically disadvantaged neighborhoods across the five boroughs. In the 1980s, gentrification tentatively arrived in Harlem, mostly by way of middle-class black residents who, as Monique M. Taylor writes in “Can You Go Home Again? Black Gentrification and the Dilemma of Difference,” were looking for “real estate bargains” while also being “strongly motivated by a desire to participate in the rituals that define daily life in this (in)famous and historically black community.

https://ny.curbed.com/2018/1/10/16868494/harlem-history-buckminster-fuller-development-rezoning

For more, see:

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/when-june-jordan-and-buckminster-fuller-tried-to-redesign-harlem

https://ny.curbed.com/2018/1/10/16868494/harlem-history-buckminster-fuller-development-rezoning