Waiting to Open

A photograph from October 1977 recently came on Ebay. The scene is a corner of Lenox Avenue and 124th Street, where a line of men awaits entry into a liquor store.

Here is the back of the print.

The location is now the home of Harlem Shake. Note how the liquors sign on the corner of the building, remains:

Trash Talk

The City has an article about the DSNY garage at 99th Street and the stop-gap, open-air new location on East 127th Street:

https://www.thecity.nyc/2021/9/28/22695132/east-harlem-waiting-for-long-term-trash-fix-four-years-after-de-blasio-pledge

A Wooden Harlem House

Ephemeral New York had a great article about a small, two-story wooden home on West 124th Street, here in Harlem.

Today the location is the back of Whole Foods (essentially their loading dock) :

But in the 19th century (and into the early 20th century) a small wooden home with a charming Victorian porch held the address 109 West 124th Street:

Ephemeral New York estimates it was built in the 1850’s. By 1887 it was sold for $10,000.

The house was briefly the location of an art school called the Lenox Art Academy. Several newspaper references in the early 1900s note the classes the school offered and gallery exhibitions.

To read the full article, see:

Early Voting Ends Today

https://www.voting.nyc/how-to-vote/early-voting/

If you want to vote early, today’s your day. Make sure to check your early polling place as this frequently differs from your normal election day site.

If you have time on Tuesday to volunteer, many campaigns are looking for people to hand out literature, rally support, or wave signs.

Yesterday, the Kristin Jordan team noted that any/all help would be appreciated on Tuesday at 134th and Lenox. But whatever candidate/s you support would likely love to have a few extra hands, so please reach out to their campaigns and help get Harlem to the polls.

Protest Tomorrow @2:00 PM

Join tomorrow’s March on Gracie Mansion.

We are marching for housing for the homeless because we are disgusted at the ineffectiveness and the cost of New York’s current shelter system.  Every day the residents of Harlem see shelter residents discharged onto our streets without adequate support.  As a result, our streets and our parks have become part of the Department of Homeless Services shelter system – failing shelter residents and failing the communities that house them.

The gross mismanagement of Harlem’s homeless shelter system, coupled with the oversaturation of shelters in our community reflects decades of systemic racism and closely follows the patterns laid out by redlining.  Wealthier and frequently whiter neighborhoods in New York do not carry their fair share of New York’s shelter system.  Our proud village of Harlem demands that all communities help to shelter our homeless neighbors and we have united behind a “Housing Not Shelter” policy.  

We have 4 demands of our current and future mayor:

  1. Oversaturated communities’ shelters must be redistributed to neighborhoods that are not sheltering their fair share of homeless New Yorkers
  2. The shelter system’s budget must transition from shelters to market-rate rent vouchers.
  3. Large congregant shelters must be downsized immediately and adequately staffed and supported
  4. Shelter residents should be supported on-site with drug treatment, mental health, education, and job training programs directly located in the shelters.

Play Street This Summer on West 124