HBCU College Fair

The NYPD and the 28th Precinct is inviting you to their 1st HBCU College Fair that will take place on June 5th, 2021 from 1200-1600 hrs. It will take place in the rear of the 28th precinct 2271 8th Avenue (St. Nicholas btw W 122st & W 123rd St). Please share with any youth you know that may be interested in attending college. Also, if you can post on your social media accounts that would be awesome. Hope to see you there! Thank you.  

Police Officer Yvonne Edwards

28TH PRECINCT Youth Coordination Officer

PATROL BOROUGH MANHATTAN NORTH

2271-89 8TH AVENUE

New York, NY 10027

212-678-1611

929-281-4228 Dept cell

#NYPD​4theKids

Follow us on FB – https://www.facebook.com/NYPDYouth 

and IG – https://www.instagram.com/nypdyouthstrategies/

Did You Know…”

The Community Affairs Bureau offers a variety of information including personal safety tips and local events. Sign up today, by visiting www.nypdcommunityaffairs.com for more information.” or by texting NYPD to 22828

http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/community_affairs/newsletter_signup.shtml

Uptown Grand Central Strikes Again

Uptown Grand Central, our amazing business alliance group, has done a fantastic job to beautify tree pits that it protected with metal guards a few years ago.

Thanks so much, Uptown Grand Central, for all you do!

And yes, you can help beautify your community too (this weekend)!

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Hey everyone! How have you been?? I hope this email finds you well. 
Are you following us on Instagram and Facebook yet? Have you seen all the incredible events we already had this year? Feeling so grateful and humbled here. It’s amazing what we can do together! Check pictures of our events on our social media! 
We already collected hundreds of pounds of litter from our streets in East Harlem, bringing awareness about this major problem in our community and planet! This year we have also been planting sunflower seeds and other wildflowers on the street tree beds, for the benefit of our urban ecosystem and to beautify and uplift our community.  Who can be sad or mad staring at a sunflower? The weather has been unpredictable and birds are having to adapt fast, but we hope our flowers can sustain pollinators’ lives and feed the birds too. Here’s where we planted so far:
Sunflower Map.jpg

We are very excited to team up with Friends of the East River Esplanade (60th-120th st) to create pollinators gardens on our riverfront near 96th St. Join us this Saturday and don’t miss the fun. Feel free to invite your contacts. Volunteers must be 18+ for this specific event. Please RSVP.
EH Esplanade Final.jpg


Friends of the East River Esplanade (60th-120th st) invite kids for this fun event:
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https://www.eventbrite.com/e/youth-fishing-clinic-in-east-harlem-tickets-152414775697

And this Sunday, Growing Green is hosting their first event in Harlem and we’ll be there to support them! Let’s see what many artists and dedicated volunteers can create together? Let me know if you are joining the fun. 11am in front of the Apollo Theatre. Growing Green.jpg

We’ll keep you posted about the events on May 22nd at the Thomas Jefferson Park and Sunshine Playground. Save the date! 
Cheers!🌳🌻

Simone [email protected]

What Now? (After the storm)

After Hurricane (or Tropical Storm) Isaias tore through New York City, the city, businesses, utilities, and neighbors have all been struggling to deal with the loss of mature trees. This tree on Randall’s Island (just over the 103st Bridge) is one example:

Before the storm and before COVID, the city had been marking-up, grinding out, and preparing a number of empty tree pits in our community for replanting with a new, young tree. This is a classic example:

Where the sidewalk has been cut out to the regulation size, and the address (on 5th Avenue) has been spray painted in white. This tree pit should have been populated in March but now who knows what will happen with the COVID related budget cuts that are starting to be felt in all city departments?

Street trees store 23% of all the carbon that New Yorkers produce. NYC ‘forests’ – think trees in parks – store another 69%:

See:

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-08-28/planting-city-trees-with-a-new-focus-on-equity?

Tree Pits and the Madison/127 Garden

New York and Harlem tree pits are often under appreciated sites of beauty in this urban world. I just thought I’d share 2 photos of flowers in my tree pit to add a bit of beauty to your day:

On a more somber note, the wonderful garden that has graced Madison Avenue just above 127th Street is about to ‘end’. John, the gardener who’s managed that lot (actually a collection of lots) for a very long time now, is leaving the city and retiring to the midwest. It will be sad to see him go, and his garden go untended. He did note that the owner of the lot has been showing it, or was, at least, in the spring.

It’s actually kind of fitting that Google Street View caught John in the garden as it drove past:

We’ll miss you, John.

Help Our Trees

As the recent hurricane showed, our street trees take a huge beating in extraordinary events like Isaias and in the world of day-to-day life on the streets of New York.

You may not know this but the moment a tree is planted in the sidewalk, the open patch of dirt and anything contained in it miraculously (okay, legally) changes from DOT control to Parks Department. Flowers, mulch, tree guards, trees, whatever – if it’s in a tree pit, Parks owns it – even if you planted it!

There is no (legal) such thing as ‘my’ tree in the sidewalk. The city owns it and manages it via the Parks Department irrespective of origin. That said, we all exist in a realpolitik space where we can’t necessarily count on city agencies to respond to every minute need, and thus we, as concerned citizens, need to take the initiative and do what’s right.

After paving (think Park and 5th Avenues this past week), block parties, film shoots, and family gatherings, ‘our’ street trees often remain taped with notices. Please, if you see taped notices on trees, remove it as carefully as you can.

Tape traps moisture, that both rots bark, and provides a moist haven for damaging insects. (Think of bandaids you might have left on a bit too long.)

Always, remove taped/stapled notices from trees (once the event has passed) and help a struggling street tree.