HNBA Meeting Tonight at 7:00 PM

We hope you’ll come out for our final HNBA meeting of the season (before our summer break) on Tuesday, June 14th at 7:00 PM.

To get the Zoom link:

We’ll hear from the Citizens Union about what is on the horizon for redistricting City Council that could change whether or not you are considered part of (central) Harlem or part of East Harlem.  Dan (from Citizen’s Union) will talk about what’s on the horizon and how you can add your voice to the mapping changes that are coming.

We’ll also get a follow-up from Wilfredo Lopez on the DSNY’s budget – one that gives significantly more money to the UES compared to East Harlem.

Lastly, we’ll hear from Shawanna Vaughn who is challenging Inez Dickens for State Assembly from her base in Lincoln Houses.

Summer of Soul in MGP

On Friday, June 17, 7:30 PM, head to Marcus Garvey Park to see a screening of “Summer of Soul (….or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised)”

Summer of Soul Redux?

Summer Of Soul (… Or When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised), the Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson-directed film that won the Oscar and the Grammy for documenting 1969’s now-famed Harlem Cultural Festival, has inspired a reboot of the landmark music event.

Ambassador Digital Magazine editor-in-chief Musa Jackson, who attended the 1969 event and appeared in Summer of Soul, said Tuesday that he, BNP Advisory Group strategist Nikoa Evans and event producer and Captivate Marketing Group president Yvonne McNair are teaming to launch the Harlem Festival of Culture in the summer of 2023.

The multi-day outdoor concert event will be a reimagining of the 1969 fest and take place in Harlem’s Marcus Garvey Park, where the original took place when it was known as Mount Morris Park. Official dates have not yet been announced.

“The original event was truly a once-in-a-lifetime experience, one that I will never forget,” Jackson told Billboard. “With this initiative, we want to create something that evokes that same sense of pride in our community that I felt on that special day in 1969. We want to authentically encapsulate the full scope: the energy, the music, the culture. We want people to understand that this festival is being built by the people who are from, live and work in this community.”

Photography at the Schomburg

Make sure to check out Been/Seen – an exhibit of historical and contemporary photography at the Schomburg Library Gallery – on display now.

This exhibit juxtaposes classic images in the Schomburg’s collection with new work.

Compost Project Launch

May 14th at 3:00 PM

Abyssinian Tot Lot at 130 West 139th Street

MMPCIA Meeting on Tuesday

Join MMPCIA on Tuesday at 6:00 PM

Here’s the link:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86847234917

Caribbean New Yorkers

The largest wave of immigrants from the Caribbean came to Harlem during the Harlem renaissance. Indeed, many of the greatest artists, luminaries, and thinkers of the Harlem Renaissance were Caribbean-born. Claude McKay, Marcus Garvey, and Arturo Schomburg.

Claude McKay

Almost a quarter of Harlem’s Black population was foreign-born in the 1920s. Earlier, however, in 1880, the distribution of Caribbean immigrants was thin:

However, by 1910, the beginnings of a Caribbean enclave around Lenox/5th Avenues and 131st to 138th Streets had begun:

The father of James Weldon Johnson – Harlem Renaissance poet and author of the Black National Anthem: Lift Every Voice and Sing – was born in the Bahamas and likely figured in the census data map, above.

See more at Mapping Historical New York.

Questlove Notes That Harlem in 2022 is Still Facing Many of the Issues it Faced in 1968

Governor Hochul & OASAS Commissioner Chinazo Cunningham: Stop Fueling the Overdose Epidemic!

We are asking Governor Hochul and Commissioner Cunningham to commit to reducing the disproportionate density of drug programs in communities of color like Harlem. We believe that a fair-share distribution of small-scale, effective, and holistic OASAS-licensed programs in all New York neighborhoods will lead to more effective outcomes and reduce overdose deaths. By leveraging the OASAS relicensing process and new Opioid Settlement funds, Governor Hochul and Commissioner Cunningham have the power to rebalance OASAS programs on a geographic and racial fair-share basis.

Sign the petition if you agree.

Currently, the imbalance in Harlem is such that 75% of the opioid treatment patients that OASAS sends to programs located in Harlem and East Harlem do not live in our community – traveling from as far away as Staten Island. While our community only accounts for 8% of all opioid treatment patients, OASAS sends 20% of all patients to Harlem every day. We are advocating for OASAS to decentralize the concentration of opioid centers in Harlem and commit to a data-driven and equitable approach that increases access to community-based programs that are small-scale, effective, and holistic.

Why is this important?
We ask OASAS to join us in fighting this imbalance for three reasons. First, we know that when programs are more conveniently located in all neighborhoods, drug treatment success increases with positive outcomes. Second, we know that the current presence of treatment mega-centers in communities of color reinforces the message that addiction is a Black issue and one that should be contained in Black neighborhoods. Third, concentrating the majority of the city’s programs in Harlem fuels the overdose epidemic. New Yorkers shouldn’t have to go out of their way to access vital care. Equitably distributing the locations of treatment centers throughout NY will not only work towards racial justice, it will also lead to better health outcomes for all.

Sign the petition if you agree.

Harlem Wednesday – Animation

An animated film titled “Harlem Wednesday”:

Listen: Questlove Details the Recovery and Birth of Summer of Soul

Until about a year ago, if you mentioned the cultural impact of the Harlem Cultural Festival, most people wouldn’t know what you were talking about. Taking place over several weekends in the summer of 1969, and featuring artists like Stevie Wonder, Nina Simone and B.B. King, the Harlem Cultural Festival was vastly overshadowed in the media by Woodstock. Extensive footage and recordings from it sat packed away in a basement for decades, so the event survived mostly in the memories of the people who were there. And then, Questlove was approached to make that footage into a documentary.

That award-winning film, called Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised), was Questlove’s directorial debut. And recently — naturally — he released the soundtrack to go along with it.

https://www.npr.org/2022/02/04/1078218490/questlove-breaks-down-the-process-of-directing-his-celebrated-doc-summer-of-soul

Summer of Soul, Tonight!

Head to the Harlem Rose Garden tonight at dusk for a screening of Summer of Soul. The Harlem Rose Garden (East 129th Street at 5th Avenue) is a gorgeous oasis and cultural hub for the community. Bring bug spray and get ready for one of the best films of the year.

Tomorrow, also feel free to drop by the Harlem Rose Garden to participate in Harlem Week’s evening of the Harlem Swing Society starting at 7 PM (Friday). The event: “A Taste of The Harlem Renaissance”  includes dance performances, dance lessons and a rare film of the 1920s – 50s Harlem.

And here are more great events at Harlem Rose Garden:

Bedbugs!

Yikes!

How Calculated: Estimated number of adults reporting a problem with bed bugs that required an exterminator, in the past 12 months, divided by the number of adults, expressed as a percent

Source: New York City Community Health Survey (CHS)

Summer of Soul is Here!

On Juneteenth, in Marcus Garvey Park!

SUMMER OF SOUL (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised)

Screening: SUMMER OF SOUL (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised) – City Parks Foundation

SCREENING: SUMMER OF SOUL (…OR, WHEN THE REVOLUTION COULD NOT BE TELEVISED)

Presented by Target and In Association with NYC Parks’ Historic Harlem Parks and Jazzmobile

Saturday, June 19, 2021

5:00 pm – 8:30 pm (Doors open 3:00 pm)

Marcus Garvey Park

18 Mt. Morris Park West, New York, NY 10027

Celebrate Juneteenth in Harlem with a free, outdoor screening of Summer of Soul presented by Target in association with Capital One City Parks Foundation SummerStage, NYC Parks’ Historic Harlem Parks and JazzMobile. The special advance screening will be followed by live performances at The Richard Rodgers Amphitheater in Marcus Garvey Park featuring Questlove and surprise guests. Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised), directed by Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson, highlights the story of the momentous 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, featuring never-before-seen footage from the massive concert series that was – until now – virtually eliminated from the history books. The film had its world premiere at the 2021 Sundance Film Festival and was met with rave reviews, taking home both the grand jury prize and the audience award. SUMMER OF SOUL will stream on Hulu in conjunction with Disney General Entertainment’s Onyx Collective; Searchlight Pictures will release it theatrically on July 2, 2021.