How Long Does It Take To Build In NYC?

Between 2016 and this year, it took an average of 545 business days, or roughly two calendar years, for a developer to go from initially filing a project proposal with the DOB to receiving the first certificate of occupancy, the department said. The process took the longest time in Manhattan, about three years, and the shortest time on Staten Island, about a year and a half.

Crains has an article on this building in East Harlem:

https://www.crainsnewyork.com/news/case-study-what-it-took-get-affordable-apartment-project-built-east-harlem

July 31st – Tour East Harlem Parks

Join Manhattan’s Community Board 11 Environment, Open Space & Parks Committee in a fantastic tour of 14 parks in upper East Harlem.

The tour starts at Marcus Garvey Park – where 5th Avenue and 120th Street meet, on Saturday, July 31st, at 10:00 AM.

Walking Distance to a Park

How Calculated: 

A map of “walk-to-a-park service areas” from the NYC Parks Department was overlayed onto a map of 2017 population estimates by census tract to calculate the percentage of the population that potentially live within the service area. These percentages were aggregated up to a neighborhood level.

Source: New York City Department of Parks and Recreation,New York City DOHMH population estimates, modified from US Census Bureau inter-censal population estimates

Manhattan 11 DSNY Garage Moving to East 127th Street

The equipment parked and stored at the decrepit garage on 1st Avenue will all move to East 127th Street in the next year or so. The new facility that is being built across from the Proton Center and between 2nd and 3rd Avenues will be open air.

Numbers of Opioid Commuters

The map below shows not only which zip codes are the home zip codes of men and women who commute into Harlem and East Harlem for opioid treatment, but the numbers of them. The darker the green, the more residents of that zip code commute into our community (typically daily) for their treatment.

Hover over the map, and you’ll get the zip code totals.

Mayoral Forum – Focused on Parks

A New Vision for Parks & Open SpaceSponsored by New Yorkers for Parks and the Play Fair CoalitionNY4PPlay Fair Coalition     Presented by New York Law School New York Law SchoolMonday, April 19
6:30 – 8:00pm EST

RSVP
Join New Yorkers for Parks and the Play Fair Coalition – and its 300+ parks advocates across the city – for a conversation with New York City mayoral candidates on the future of NYC’s parks and open spaces and the policies we need to create a 21st century, equitable system.
It’s been a year of highs and lows. Though New Yorkers turned out in unprecedented numbers for their parks during the pandemic, citywide conditions reached a low point as the Parks Department struggled to weather an $80 million budget cut.
Now is the time for New York to prioritize parks as critical infrastructure. We need a bold, new vision from our next Mayor – to realize a new era in which all New Yorkers enjoy equitable access to safe and clean parks in their communities.
Invited CandidatesEric AdamsArt ChangKathryn GarciaRay McGuireDianne MoralesScott StringerMaya WileyAndrew Yang
Moderated byJuan Manuel Benítez
Political anchor and reporter
NY1 News / NY1 Noticias

Forum Co-SponsorsThe event is co-sponsored by the Play Fair Coalition, including more than 300 advocacy groups across the city – from all the city park conservancies to scores of smaller grass roots organizations and friends-of groups.
RSVP TODAY

Ask The 2021 Mayoral Candidates Your Questions

While the most important election of our lifetime is now only 47 days away, our city will also be reshaped by the 2021 elections which include electing a new mayor.

The City (an online NYC new organization) is soliciting your questions for mayoral hopefuls.  
Please take a moment and go to:  

https://www.thecity.nyc/politics/2020/9/14/21437265/ask-the-next-mayor-new-york-city-2021-city-hall

and (among other things) please ask the candidates to address the issue of how systemic racism has resulted in an oversaturation of addiction programs being located here, in Harlem and East Harlem, and what (as mayor) they would do to ensure that wealthier and whiter communities take their fair share of new and existing programs.

We want this issue to be on their radar, early in the process.

Racism, Heat, and Barriers to Access

WeAct for Environmental Justice has an interesting paper out on how public access to open, green spaces maps remarkably onto redlined Manhattan:

The heat stressed communities (mapped in dark red) are clearly similar to the redlined map (above):

Correlation is not causation, of course, but it does point to how systemic (and multimodal) the complex issues of racism, history, policy, economics, and more are. All these causes and consequences are not just intertwined, but also reinforcing.

As the authors note:

Northern Manhattan is home to beautiful parks, but many less visible barriers remain, limiting access to these spaces for surrounding residents. Another recent analysis revealed “parks serving primarily nonwhite populations are half the size of parks that serve majority white populations and are five times more crowded.” This poses significant safety challenges to urban residents of color who are turning to these public green spaces to practice social distancing and cool down amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, people of color may be deterred from spending time in green spaces by fear of unfair treatment by police. Other occupants of the green space, namely white people, also pose potential threats to the safety of people of color, as demonstrated by the recent example of Amy Cooper threatening Christian Cooper in Central Park.

For the whole paper and more analysis, see:

https://www.weact.org/2020/08/public-green-spaces-racism-heat-and-barriers-to-access/

Hello Harlem friends, neighbors, and yogis, this could be you! 

Lucia Russett has been teaching outdoor, in-person yoga classes through Harlem Yoga Studio–and they’re now extending their schedule! 

Lucia will be there every Monday starting tomorrow, 9/14, from 5:30-6:45pm, as long as the weather holds. Here are the details:

  • We’ll meet in the NE corner of the park at 124th and Madison. At 5:30, we’ll walk up the path together to the fire watch tower area, which has a quiet, open space for yoga.
  • Bring your own mat. The ground there is paved, so extra padding would be helpful.
  • Sign up in advance on the HYS website.
  • Other park classes (with a rotation of teachers) are Wed. evenings at 5:30, and Sunday and Tuesday mornings (on the grass) at 10.
  • Mats will be spaced; wear a mask until you’re on your mat.
  • http://harlemyogastudio.com/schedule/