Uptown Grand Central

Wanna talk trash with us? The NYC Department of Sanitation will roll with resources for a community cleanup this Saturday, July 30, from 12-2 p.m.

DSNY will bring their van full of brooms, trashcans and trash-pickers 
— and we’ll have the chance to not only pitch in, but talk trashcans and basket collection with Deputy Speaker Diana Ayala. Plus learn about needle pickup & the new needle pickup hotline (718-415-3708) with the New York Harm Reduction Educators (NYHRE).

We’ll also have unlimited cold drinks on hand! Click here to register

Mural Unveiling

Join Mattaya and the Hi-ARTS community on August 5, 2022 from 12-3 pm for the Reveal and Celebration of Musa as well as a Planting Workshop with artist Tasha Dougé.

This July we welcomed Mattaya Fitts as our inaugural ONE WALL MOVEMENT muralist. All month she worked on Musa,a mural that now adorns Cherry Tree Park in Harlem, NY.
Free & open to the public. Just show up!

Musa Reveal & Celebration 
August 5, 12-3 pm

Planting Workshop with Tasha Dougé
1:30-3 pm

 A creative planting and community intention setting exercise curated by Tasha Dougé. Tasha Dougé is a Bronx-based, Haitian-infused artist, artivist and cultural vigilante. Her body of work activates conversations around women empowerment, health advocacy, sexual education, societal “norms,” identity and Black community pride.

Workshop capacity is limited to 20 participants. No registration necessary.

Free & open to the public. Just show up!

“At a time when much feels heavy and uncertain, I am interested in conveying themes of personal growth, rest, joy, and transformation. This mural addresses self-care as an extension of community care.” @mattayafitts

Harlem Grown Garden (West 127th Street)

The Harlem Grown Garden, on West 127th Street is a jewel in the community. It’s got chickens, raised beds, solar power, and a robust community engagement schedule that includes compost drop-offs.

And to top it off, the East side of the garden has a fantastic mural for all to see:

All The East Harlem Block Parties And Events

PS 57 Farmstand – Farmers Market

Wednesdays, July 6 – November 23, 2022 (set up 7:00 a.m. – breakdown 5:30 p.m.)

Location: East 106th Street between Lexington Avenue and 3rd Avenue 

Street Closure: Partial Sidewalk Closure

Applicant: Cathy Chambers

Sponsor: Council on the Environment Inc dba GROWNYC

HHFM East Harlem Market – Farmers Market

Thursdays, July 7 – November 17, 2022 (set up 8:00 a.m. – breakdown 4:00 p.m.)

Location: East 104th Street between 2nd Avenue and 3rd Avenue  

Street Closure: Full Sidewalk Closure

Applicant: Maritza Owens

Sponsor: Maritza Owens

SB DAY – Block Party

July 9, 2022 (set up 12:00 p.m. – breakdown 9:00 p.m.)

Location: East 122nd Street between Lexington Avenue and 3rd Avenue  

Street Closure: Sidewalk and Street Closure 

Applicant: Brandy Walker

Sponsor: Reyn or Shyne Inc.

111th Street Old-Timers Day – Street Festival 

July 10, 2022 (set up 7:00 a.m. – breakdown 6:00 p.m.)

Location: East 111 Street between 5th Avenue and Madison Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Wilfred Renta

Sponsor: 111th Street Boys Oldtimers Stickball Inc.

100th Street July Convening- Block Party

July 16, 2022 (set up 11:00 a.m. – breakdown 6:00 p.m.)

Location: East 100th Street between Lexington Avenue and 3rd Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Pablo Guzman

Sponsor: Union Settlement

HHFM Metropolitan Market – Farmers Market

June 17, 2022 (set up 7:00 a.m. – breakdown November 18, 2022 4:00 p.m.)

Location: 2nd Avenue between East 97th Street and East 98th Street 

Street Closure: Sidewalk and Curb LaneClosure

Applicant: Maritza Owens

Sponsor: Harvest Home Farmers Market Inc

Uptown Bounce 2022 – Street Event

Thursdays, July 21 – August 4, 2022 (set up 3:00 p.m. – breakdown 9:00 p.m.)

Location: East 104th Street between 5th Avenue and Madison Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure 

Applicant: Chelsey Pellot

Sponsor: El Museo del Barrio

JungleGym 2022 – Street Event

July 22, 2022 (set up 9:30 a.m. – breakdown 5:30 p.m.)

Location: East 116th Street between Lexnginton Avenue and 3rd Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Mac Levine

Sponsor: Concrete Safaris Inc.

Community Day – Religious Event

July 23, 2022 (set up 10:30 a.m. – breakdown 4:00 p.m.)

Location: East 100th Street between Lexington Avenue and Park Avenue   

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Reverend Felipe Ayala

Sponsor: Life Changers Church and Ministries

5th Avenue July Party – Block Party

July 23, 2022 (set up 1:00 p.m. – breakdown 9:00 p.m.)

Location: East 126th Street between 5th Avenue and Madison Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure 

Applicant: Megan Moore

Sponsor: 2041 5th HDFC Co-Op/Residents of the Block

Barbecue Block Party

July 23, 2022 (set up 12:00 p.m. – breakdown 9:00 p.m.)

Location: East 129th Street between 5th Avenue and Madison Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Roshaunda Wickham

Sponsor: Residents of the Block

11th Annual Welcome Home BBQ – Block Party

July 30, 2022 (set up 10:00 a.m. – breakdown 7:00 p.m.)

Location: East 119th Street between 2nd Avenue and 3rd Avenue

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Diana Ortiz

Sponsor: Exodus Transitional Community, Inc

1405/107 Family Reunion – Block Party

July 30, 2022 (set up 11:30 a.m. – breakdown 8:00 p.m.)

Location: East 105th Street between Park Avenue Avenue and Lexington Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Vendetta Smith 

Sponsor: Residents of the Block

A Healthy You – Block Party

July 30, 2022 (set up 11:00 a.m. – breakdown 8:00 p.m.)

Location: East 123rd Street between 2nd Avenue and 3rd Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure 

Applicant: Swann Streety

Sponsor: Chambers Memorial Baptist Church

Giglio Feast of Sant Antonio – Street Event

August 3, 2022 (set up 7:00 a.m. – breakdown August 8, 2022, 8:00 a.m.)

Location 1: Pleasant Avenue between East 114th Street and East 116th Street 

Location 2: East 114th Street between Pleasant Avenue and 1st Avenue

Location 3: East 115th Street between Pleasant Avenue and 1st Avenue 

Street Closure: Sidewalk andCurb LaneClosure

Applicant: Mitchell Farbman

Sponsors: Giglio Society Of East Harlem Our Lady of Mount Carmel Shrine Church; Sons of San Paulino Inc.; Union Settlement; Operation Fightback

Family Day – Block Party

August 5, 2022 (set up 9:00 a.m. – breakdown 5:30 p.m.)

Location: East 127th Street between 3rd Avenue and Lexington Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Sidewalk Closure

Applicant: Diane Spann

Sponsor: Addie Mae Collins Community Service

JungleGym 2022 – Street Event

August 12, 2022 (set up 9:30 a.m. – breakdown 5:30 p.m.)

Location: East 106th Street between Lexington Avenue and 3rd Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Mac Levine

Sponsor: Concrete Safaris Inc.

Family Day – Block Party

August 13, 2022 (set up 10:00 a.m. – breakdown 8:00 p.m.)

Location: East 99th Street between Lexington Avenue and Park Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Annique Webster

Sponsor: Lexington Houses Resident Council

Old Timers Block Party

August 20, 2022 (set up 11:00 a.m. – breakdown 8:00 p.m.)

Location: East 100th Street between 1st Avenue and 2nd Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Alan Cox

Sponsor: 342 E 100st Coop. Association

Family Day – Block Party

August 20, 2022 (set up 9:00 a.m. – breakdown 6:00 p.m.)

Location: East 138th Street between Madison Avenue and 5th Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure 

Applicant: Charlotte Mimiasie

Sponsor: Riverton Tenants Association

Back to School – Block Party

August 20, 2022 (set up 10:00 a.m. – breakdown 6:00 p.m.)

Location: East 117th Street between Madison Avenue and 5th Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure 

Applicant: Erica Johnson 

Sponsor: Residents of the Block 

Back To School Education Block Party

August 27, 2022 (set up 10:00 a.m. – breakdown 5:00 p.m.)

Location: East 100th Street between Lexington Avenue and Park Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Reverend Felipe Ayala

Sponsor: Life Changers Church and Ministries of Manhattan Inc

Dewitt Clinton Family Day – Block Party

August 27, 2022 (set up 12:00 p.m. – breakdown 8:00 p.m.)

Location: East 109th Street between Lexington Avenue and Park Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Dewitt Clinton

Sponsor: Dewitt Clinton Houses Tenant Association (NYCHA)

Rehoboth Annual Back to School Festival

August 27, 2022 (set up 9:00 a.m. – breakdown 5:00 p.m.)

Location: East 118th Street between Lexington Avenue and 3rd Avenue  

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Obed Vazquez

Sponsor: Mision Cristiana Rehoboth Inc.

Community Love – Street Event

August 27, 2022 (set up 10:00 a.m. – breakdown 6:00 p.m.)

Location: East 124th Street between Madison Avenue and Park Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Michelle Chapman

Sponsor: Joyce Almeida

El Barrio Old Timers – Block Party

September 3, 2022 (set up 12:00 p.m. – breakdown 7:00 p.m.)

Location: East 105th Street between Madison Avenue and 5th Avenue  

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: William Velazquez

Sponsor: Residents of the block

Back to Beautiful – Street Event

September 3, 2022 (set up 8:00 a.m. – breakdown 6:00 p.m.)

Location: East 128th Street between Lexington Avenue and Park Avenue  

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Shawnique Woolfalk

Sponsor: Art in the Park

100th Street September Convening – Block Party

September 10, 2022 (set up 11:00 a.m. – breakdown 5:30 p.m.)

Location: East 100th Street between Lexington Avenue and 3rd Avenue  

Street Closure: Full Street Closure

Applicant: Pablo Guzman

Sponsor: Union Settlement

Mexican Independence Day 2022 – Single Block Festival

September 18, 2022 (set up 8:00 a.m. – breakdown 8:00 p.m.)

Location: East 116th Street between 3rd Avenue and 2nd Avenue 

Street Closure: Full Street Closure 

Applicant: Pablo Guzman

Sponsor: Union Settlement

Elizabeth Jennings

On July 16th, 1854 – a young black schoolteacher named Elizabeth Jennings was on her way to the First Colored American Congregational Church. Elizabeth was the church organist, and needed to catch the Third Avenue streetcar. Although slavery had been abolished in New York in 1827, New York City was heavily formally and informally segregated.

The conductor of the arriving streetcar told Jennings to wait for the next which “had [her] people in it.” She declared she “had no people.” This second car was too full for her to board, so she got on the first, and refused to leave.

This story, of course, brings to mind Rosa Parks, who 101 years later, refused to give up her seat in Montgomery, Alabama. Parks rejected bus driver James F. Blake’s order to vacate a row of four seats in the “colored” section in favor of a white passenger, once the “white” section was filled. Parks wasn’t the first person to resist bus segregation, but the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) believed that she was the best candidate for seeing through a court challenge after her arrest for violating Alabama segregation laws.

Jennings, however, also began a case against the New York streetcar company that led to the desegregation of New York’s public transit.Elizabeth Jennings Graham “deserves a place of honor in the history of civil rights in New York.”

In a 1990 article for New York History, Jennings is said to have demanded to stay on the streetcar, the conductor said, “Well, you may go in, but remember, if the passengers raise any objections you shall go out.” Jennings responded that she “was a respectable person, born and raised in New York” and “that he was a good for nothing impudent fellow for insulting decent persons while on their way to church.” This riled the conductor, who tried to pull her from the car where she clung to the window sash. She recalled:

[The conductor and driver] then both seized hold of me by the arms and pulled and dragged me flat down on the bottom of the platform, so that my feet hung one way and my head the other, nearly on the ground. I screamed murder with all my voice, and my companion screamed out, “You’ll kill her. Don’t kill her.” The driver then let go of me and went to his horses. I went again in the car, and the conductor said you shall sweat for this. Then (he) told the driver to drive as fast as he could and not to take another passenger in the car, to drive until he saw an officer or a Station House.

The police officer they found pushed Jennings out of the streetcar, dirtying her clothes, and, she stated, “tauntingly told me to get redress if I could.”

Her case was soon brought to court, taken on by a 24-year-old Chester A. Arthur, the future twenty-first president. “What may have started as one woman’s individual protest had really become a class action.” writes Hewitt.

In February of 1855, Jennings was awarded $225 in damages. Furthermore, the New York State Supreme Court, Brooklyn Circuit ruled that African Americans could not be excluded from transit provided they were “sober, well behaved, and free from disease.”

Jennings worked as a teacher until the 1860s, then in 1895 established New York’s first kindergarten for African-American children in her home on West 41st Street. She died on June 5th, 1901. “Openly discriminatory practices in public transportation did come to an end in New York City during Elizabeth Jennings’ lifetime, after the New York State legislature passed the Civil Rights Act of 1873,” writes Hewitt. “If only because she started something far larger than herself and laid the groundwork for the further progress that was to come, she deserves a place of honor in the history of civil rights in New York.”

Near where she made her streetcar stand, there is public recognition of her legacy. In 2007, a street sign was installed at Spruce Street and Park Row, renaming this corner of Manhattan “Elizabeth Jennings Place.”

Oh, and there is a book: https://bookshop.org/books/streetcar-to-justice-how-elizabeth-jennings-won-the-right-to-ride-in-new-york/9780062673602

As Seen on West 126th Street

Kudos to Metropolitan Hospital

The Metropolitan Hospital – as a part of NYC Health + Hospitals – has announced it will participate in a “Medical Eracism” initiative to eliminate biased, race-based assessments used for decades in hospitals and clinics across the country to influence medical decisions that have been found to negatively impact the quality of care patients of color receive. The public health care system has already eliminated two common diagnostic tests – for kidney disease and vaginal birth after a cesarean delivery (VBAC) – that have embedded race-based calculations for severity of illness and risk, and can lead to implicit biases and errors in diagnosis and treatment. This initiative builds on the health system’s commitment to eliminate implicit bias in health care and provide equitable, quality care to more than one million New Yorkers who choose NYC Health + Hospitals as their medical home. For more information visit here.

Metropolitan has also been named “America’s most racially inclusive hospital” in the 2021 Lown Hospitals Index, the first ranking to examine the racial inclusivity of over 3,200 U.S. hospitals. For more information on the rankings, visit here.

Seen on FDB

CB11 Wants to Hear From You

Manhattan CB11 is seeking your input to help determine East Harlem’s greatest needs and budget priorities for the upcoming fiscal year. You can participate in the annual budget process by filling out the Public Input Survey today! We will be accepting responses through August 22, 2021. 
Access the survey here: https://forms.gle/qHEr3WvVrxcH2kNa6

For more information, please contact the community board office at
(212)831-8929 or [email protected].