Hospitals and Their Numbers

When you think of the 3 hospitals serving the Harlem area (Metropolitan, Mount Sinai, and Harlem), how would you rank them in terms of size/capacity? If you thought that Mount Sinai was the largest of the 3, you would, of course, be correct. What you may not know is just how (relatively) large Mount Sinai is.


Harlem Hospital Center is located at 506 Lenox Avenue. Harlem Hospital Center provides a
wide range of medical, surgical, diagnostic, therapeutic, and family support services and is
designated as a Level 1 Trauma Center. In 2015, there were 272 beds in service, 213,626
outpatient visits, and 83,154 emergency room visits.


Mount Sinai Hospital is located at 1468 Madison Avenue. Mount Sinai Hospital is a 1,171-bed
tertiary-care teaching facility. The Mount Sinai Hospital is part of the larger Mount Sinai Health
System, which includes seven other hospital campuses with a combined 3,400,000 outpatient
visits and 425,451 emergency department visits.

Metropolitan Hospital Center is located at 1901 First Avenue and is a full service community
hospital. In 2015, there were 325 beds in service, 313,742 outpatient visits, and 69,583
emergency room visits.

Latest (Pre-COVID) Data II

As mentioned yesterday, one of the depressing things about looking at the data from the New York State Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) is that it repeatedly tells the same story – for decades, OASAS has packed substance abuse programs into Harlem and East Harlem; programs that wealthier and often whiter communities have successfully rebuffed.

One question often asked is who is behind the large opioid treatment programs (methadone) in East Harlem. The graph below shows that 3 of New York City’s largest methadone providers (in red) are located here, in our community:

As mentioned yesterday, OASAS has exploited the weak political resistance in Harlem and successfully lied to the community by repeatedly stating that programs in Harlem were for our neighbors, our family members, or our colleagues. The chart below shows where men and women being treated in East Harlem come/commute from to get treatment here:

Note that the largest number of non-East Harlem residents who come here for substance abuse treatment travel from Westchester and Long Island.

Greater Harlem Coalition Meeting Tonight

Join the Greater Harlem Coalition meeting tonight to learn more about Mount Sinai’s plans for new security at its Park/125th Street methadone programs and its plans for their new facility being built on West 124th Street.

Register here for the 7:00 PM Harlem Town-Hall

The Crown

While I’m not watching The Crown on Netflix, the image comparisons that are making the rounds on social media are incredible.

What did interest me, however, was that Princess Diana visited Harlem Hospital in 1989.

As Untapped New York notes:

During her last day at New York, Diana went to the Harlem Hospital (filmed at the Reynold Building in Manchester) to pay a visit to babies who were struggling with AIDS and HIV, an issue the Princess cared about deeply. In 1987, she opened the first purpose-built ward for AIDS patients at Middlesex Hospital in London. At Harlem Hospital, “she picked up a little boy who has AIDS and hugged him,” Margaret Heagarty, Director of Pediatrics at Harlem Hospital, said in a news interview. “This community and this hospital has been delighted with this charming young woman who showed with great sensitivity and compassion and interest in concern for poor children.” Throughout her life, Diana’s compassion for the sick and less privileged helped reduce the stigma of those suffering from AIDS and other diseases.

And below, and image of the hospital entrance today.

Meeting With Mount Sinai, Tomorrow

The Greater Harlem Coalition will have a town hall meeting tomorrow night at 7pm. You are welcome to join by registering here: https://fordham.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_6UAWpErMRkuvGvMDgjQ_4w

Mount Sinai will present on new security measures at their Park/125th Street methadone programs in the Lee Building. To hear more about their plans to address hanging out before and after treatment at their methadone programs next to Metro North, join the town hall.

All welcome.