HNBA (Zoom) Holiday Party! Tuesday, Dec. 8th

We’ll all readily admit that it won’t be the same, but we’re going to try anyway. Now that the turkey leftovers are gone, let’s usher in the holiday season with a Zoom HNBA Party on Tuesday, December 8th at 7:00 PM.

Subscribe to this blog: https://hnba.nyc/subscribe-to-the-hnba-blog/ to get the Zoom link (we’ll have it for you in the next week or so), and we’ll toast the end of 2020 and (hopefully) light at the end of the tunnel in 2021.

HNBA (Zoom) Holiday Party – Tuesday, December 8th!

We’ll all readily admit that it won’t be the same, but we’re going to try anyway. Now that Thanksgiving’s over, let’s usher in the holiday season with a Zoom HNBA Party on Tuesday, December 8th at 7:00 PM.

Subscribe to this blog: https://hnba.nyc/subscribe-to-the-hnba-blog/ to get the Zoom link (we’ll have it for you in the next week or so), and we’ll toast to the end of 2020 and (hopefully) light at the end of the tunnel in 2021.

HNBA Meeting on Tuesday, November 10th

HPD has a new report out on housing in New York. One of the issues it addresses is homeownership by Black New Yorkers. On Tuesday at 7:00 PM, the November HNBA meeting will have representatives from Chase Bank discuss strategies for applying for a first-time mortgage, refinancing, and a number of strategies for building your family’s assets.

As the HPD report notes:

…income from employment is a limited measure of financial security and economic opportunity. The most important and direct measure of a resident’s ability to access opportunity and financial security is wealth: the sum of a family’s assets (from equity in a hometo retirement savings) minus the debts a family owes (such as student loans or a mortgage). Data on wealth is not available for New York City residents, but, nationwide, the median wealth of White families is 10 times the wealth of Black and Hispanic families; in 2016, the median wealth of White families was $171,000, while the median wealth was $17,400 among Black families and $20,920 among Hispanic families. These disparities represent the compounded effects of advantages and disadvantages passed across generations.


Racial disparities in homeownership rates suggest some of the reasons for stark disparities in
overall household wealth by race. The Figure above shows that in New York City 28% of Black families and 17% of Hispanic families own their homes, compared to 41% of White families. The differences in homeownership stem in part from differences in the wealth that parents pass on to their children, but also reflect historic and, to some extent, current differences in access to home
mortgage loans. The figure below shows the loans commonly used for buying homes by race and
ethnicity of the borrower. In 2017, White borrowers accounted for 48% of new loans for owneroccupied, 1-4 unit properties in New York City, while Black and Hispanic borrowers each
accounted for less than 10%, far less than a proportionate share of the total population among
New Yorkers.

See: https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/hpd/downloads/pdfs/wwl-plan.pdf

Hip Hop Museum ReOpens Today

Today is the re-opening of the [R]Evolution of Hip Hop exhibition. the Hip Hop museum is located in the Terminal Market (near HomeDepot and Costco on Exterior Street) and is specifically adhering to guidance around social distancing and no large group gatherings to protect our patrons and our staff.


The [R]Evolution of Hip Hop: An immersive journey through Hip Hop History is conceived by creative agents from multiple artistic backgrounds that employ archives and experimental storytelling techniques focusing on the five elements of Hip Hop – MCing, DJing, Breakdancing, Aerosol Art,  Knowledge. The new exhibit celebrates Hip Hop’s emergence from the park jams and the projects to night clubs, national concert tours, TV and motion pictures circa 1980 to 1985. The innovative music, art, dance and fashion that first permeated city streets in the Bronx, Harlem, Brooklyn and Queens in the 1970s made its way Downtown. Saavy club promoters and risk-taking entrepreneurs would fuel the commercialization of Hip Hop culture and would give rise to the first Rap record labels, Master-Mixes on Black radio and the first smash hits on the Billboard charts. This arts and cultural revolution would soon spread Hip Hop to the West Coast and to every corner of the world.

[R]Evolution of Hip Hop @ The Bronx Terminal Market610 Exterior Street

Bronx, New York 10451

(Entrance located in the lower area parking lot between Applebee’s and Marisco Centro Restaurant)

Questions for the Commanding Officer at the 25th Precinct

We asked HNBA members to submit questions they would like Captain Henning to answer today at 7:00 PM at the September HNBA meeting. Here are the questions posed by your neighbors:

What are you and your fellow precinct and department leaders doing to ensure that your officers, most of whom do not live in this neighborhood, have the necessary levels of investment in our communities and connectivity to us as residents to ensure they patrol our streets with the respect we deserve? I think I speak for myself and my neighbors when I say we’re tired of being viewed as “other” by the cops that are supposed to be working for and with us.

Why are NYPD officers not always wearing a mask in the street?

Why is there absolutely no police presence around 6am – 8am in the morning around 125th street and Lexington Avenue?

What is being done about the homeless and drug activity around 125th and Lexington? I’ve never seen it so bad.

What is being done about the homeless and drug activity around 125th and Lexington? I’ve never seen it so bad.

With unrest in the Black community, a horrible lack preparedness to the Coronavirus, and despite that fact Trump is not supported by the majority of New Yorkers, why would the NYPD – which is supposed to be non-partisan – back Trump as President?

The Sergeants Benevolent Association this year has issued declaration of “war” on the Mayor, and appeared with QAnon material in interviews. Understanding SBA is not NYPD, but do officers at the Precinct understand, nonetheless, that these incidents have an impact in some residents’ ability to trust the police?

I’m still seeing a lot of officers without masks. I also notice around 125 and Lex they are often standing around chatting in groups of four, without masks. I asked an officer once why he wasn’t wearing a mask and he told me he was immune. Tried to tell him that was nice but he could still infect someone. He wasn’t particularly interested in hearing that. I’m trying to say “Hello” and be friendly but am not thrilled with the response I’m getting.

There are often groups of people hanging around Madison between 125 and 126, sitting in their cars and playing very loud music. I can’t imagine what the local residents feel about it but I have been told that these are drug dealers and am wondering why the police never seem to do anything about it.

What is your relationship with the MTA officers at the MetroNorth station? There was a fire in my on 125th the other day. The building on fire backed up to my garden (I’m on 126th). I wanted to tell a firefighter that if they needed to get into the rear of the building they could go thru my ground floor apartment. I asked 2 officers how to get that info to the firefighters but the officers just walked away while I was talking to them. They might have been MTA police, didn’t really think to look. But a third officer who was definitely NYPD kept dismissing me and not hearing what I was saying. Finally I got him to tell a firefighter but the whole experience got me angry.

If you are a member of HNBA (Join Here) and would like to join in the conversation tonight, email Shawn for the zoom link.