How Long Does It Take To Build In NYC?

Between 2016 and this year, it took an average of 545 business days, or roughly two calendar years, for a developer to go from initially filing a project proposal with the DOB to receiving the first certificate of occupancy, the department said. The process took the longest time in Manhattan, about three years, and the shortest time on Staten Island, about a year and a half.

Crains has an article on this building in East Harlem:

https://www.crainsnewyork.com/news/case-study-what-it-took-get-affordable-apartment-project-built-east-harlem

July 31st – Tour East Harlem Parks

Join Manhattan’s Community Board 11 Environment, Open Space & Parks Committee in a fantastic tour of 14 parks in upper East Harlem.

The tour starts at Marcus Garvey Park – where 5th Avenue and 120th Street meet, on Saturday, July 31st, at 10:00 AM.

LGA in East Harlem

La Guardia’s Apartment, before he moved to Gracie Mansion, was located on 5th Avenue at 109. Today his view would have been something like this:

A contemporary real estate site describes the location in this way:

Description

1274 Fifth is a six-story building, built in 1934, along the fabulous 50-block stretch of Fifth Avenue above 109th Street, offering gorgeous pre-war architecture, unprecedented space, and beautiful natural light. This pet-friendly building is steps from Central Park and has an on-site super.

All content above are visible to screen reader users, so you may ignore the show more button below.

Building Amenities

  • Pre War
  • Washer/Dryer in building
  • Elevator
  • Mail Room
  • Laundry Room
  • Live-In Superintendent

LaGuardia lived in an apartment in this East Harlem building, which sits on the corner of East 109th Street, when he was elected mayor in 1934. Robert Moses offered a move to Gracie Mansion, but LaGuardia decided to stay in his apartment for another eight years before finally moving to the East River.

Harlem, as the Sum of Its Residents

Bitter Root Coming to the Big Screen

For those of us who are graphic novel/comic fans, it was exciting to hear that Regina King is going to directing an adaptation of David F. Walker, Sanford Green, and Chuck Brown’s Harlem Renaissance-set comic book Bitter Root for Legendary Pictures.

Set in the ‘20s, the book is about a family of monster hunters called the Sangeryes who are tasked with defending Harlem from supernatural threats.

You either get it and love it, or you don’t. We’ll see how the film adaptation turns out…

East Harlem Waterfront Connector

The often delayed (what, 2 or 3 years delayed?) East Harlem waterfront connector is now being visualized in a number of images from the city. This new connector is to help connect the waterfront of Manhattan and reduce the distance of on-street-detours.

Still Don’t Know Who To Vote For?

The City has the answer to all the ranked choice confusion swirling around in our collective zeitgeist

By going through their version of political online dating, The City will show you which candidate’s answers to the same questions, most parallel yours:

https://projects.thecity.nyc/meet-your-mayor/ultimate-match.html

And a Great Article on New York’s Fractured Political Landscape from FiveThirtyEight.com

The 5 Political Boroughs Of New York City

By Nathaniel Rakich

Filed under New York City

Published Jun. 21, 2021

EMILY SCHERER / GETTY IMAGES

If you’re one of the approximately 320 million Americans who don’t live in New York City, it might seem like its Democratic mayoral primary has gotten an outsized amount of media coverage. But even I, a Bostonian, can admit that the complex politics of New York City makes Tuesday’s election one of the most intriguing races of the year.

The city is a stark reminder that “heavily Democratic” does not necessarily equal “far left.” The front-runner for mayor is Eric Adams, a Black former Republican who has staked his campaign on his opposition to defunding the police. Kathryn Garcia, Maya Wiley and Andrew Yang are also within striking distance in the polls, but only Wiley unambiguously belongs to the party’s progressive wing.

But it’s too facile to just say it’s progressives vs. moderates in New York City — there are far more divisions at play. The city’s politics may share the same contours that have defined so many Democratic primaries nationwide, but its racial diversity, parochial neighborhoods and sheer number of Democratic voters — each with his or her own cross-cutting identities — expose fissures within fissures. 

To illustrate this, we’ve redrawn New York City’s five boroughs into five political regions based on the results of four recent Democratic primaries: for president in 2016 (Hillary Clinton vs. Bernie Sanders), and for governor (Andrew Cuomo vs. Cynthia Nixon), lieutenant governor (Kathy Hochul vs. Jumaane Williams) and attorney general (Letitia James vs. Sean Patrick Maloney vs. Zephyr Teachout) in 2018.1 

You already know Clinton and Sanders; Nixon, an actor and progressive activist, and Williams, a self-identified socialist then serving on the New York City Council, waged spirited primary challenges to moderate incumbents Cuomo and Hochul but ultimately fell short. James, the New York City public advocate at the time, had previously been a progressive darling but aligned herself with Cuomo in the attorney general’s race; instead, Teachout, a law professor who had unsuccessfully primaried Cuomo from the left in 2014, claimed the mantle of the left in that race. (Maloney, a moderate upstate congressman, was a nonfactor in most parts of New York City — with some important exceptions.) These four races produced four different voting patterns, so together they provide a not-half-bad template for understanding the city’s political geography.

So hop on the virtual subway with us and take a tour of New York City’s five “political boroughs.” These categories will come in handy while following along with and interpreting the results of the mayoral election over the next several weeks (it’s expected to take until mid-July to get final results because New York is slow to count absentee ballots, and because the city is using ranked-choice voting for the first time). But even if that’s not your bag, the mix of ideology and identity that marks these boroughs can help deepen our understanding of the broader divisions within the Democratic Party nationwide.

The Elite Circles

When people say that New York City’s political, economic and social elite live in a bubble, this is the bubble. The Elite Circles borough2 includes most of Manhattan from the Financial District to Central Park as well as adjacent parts of Brooklyn and Queens. It’s defined by its high levels of education (63 percent of residents age 25 or older have at least a bachelor’s degree) and its whiteness — a majority of its residents (56 percent) are non-Hispanic white. However, the political borough also includes some gentrified but historically ethnic enclaves with significant Hispanic, Asian American and Black populations.

Elite Circles demographics
DEMOGRAPHICPERCENTAGE
White56%
Black8
Hispanic20
Asian14
Bachelor’s degree or higher (among 25+ population)63

White, Black and Asian American residents are non-Hispanic.

SOURCE: AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEYADVERTISING

The Elite Circles is the most progressive slice of the city. It was Williams’s best political borough in the 2018 lieutenant governor race and was the only one to support Nixon for governor and Teachout for attorney general. Sanders also turned in an above-average performance here in the 2016 Democratic presidential primary.

Recent Elite Circles election results
RACECANDIDATEVOTE SHARE
2016 Pres.Clinton61%
Sanders39
2018 Gov.Cuomo49.6
Nixon50.1
2018 Lt. Gov.Hochul38
Williams62
2018 Att. Gen.James31
Maloney15
Teachout52

SOURCE: NEW YORK CITY BOARD OF ELECTIONS

But different parts of this political borough are different degrees of progressive. Some, especially hip neighborhoods with lots of young professionals, are dyed-in-the-wool leftist, even socialist — for example, all four progressive candidates carried the state Assembly districts that cover Ditmars Steinway and Astoria in Queens and Greenpoint and Williamsburg in Brooklyn by at least 8 percentage points. And in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary, Sanders got more than 30 percent of the vote in these areas even though he had already dropped out of the race by the time New York voted.

Other neighborhoods in this borough — especially traditionally tony neighborhoods in Manhattan — are more progressive-curious. For instance, districts containing Chelsea and the Upper West Side split their 2018 tickets between Cuomo for governor and Williams for lieutenant governor. And districts that include Midtown East and the Upper East Side voted strongly for Teachout in 2018 but even more strongly for Clinton in 2016. 

In this year’s mayoral race, expect that division to manifest itself again. The Elite Circles seems like it will be fertile ground for both Wiley and Garcia, who are especially strong with college-educated respondents in polls. But the more technocratic Garcia, who has the endorsement of The New York Times, seems like a better fit for Manhattan, while the more ideologically leftist Wiley, who was endorsed by the Working Families Party and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, will likely do better in Brooklyn. (A recent Marist College poll for WNBC, Telemundo 47 and POLITICO provides evidence for this.)

The True-Blue Bronx

On the other side of the ledger, the True-Blue Bronx3 is the least college-educated (just 18 percent) and most consistently pro-establishment region of New York City. Clinton defeated Sanders 70 percent to 30 percent here; Hochul beat Williams 59 percent to 41 percent. Teachout got only 8 percent in this political borough, well outpaced by both James and Maloney. Most dramatically, Cuomo defeated Nixon 84 percent to 16 percent here.

Recent True-Blue Bronx election results
RACECANDIDATEVOTE SHARE
2016 Pres.Clinton70%
Sanders30
2018 Gov.Cuomo84
Nixon16
2018 Lt. Gov.Hochul59
Williams41
2018 Att. Gen.James69
Maloney20
Teachout8

SOURCE: NEW YORK CITY BOARD OF ELECTIONS

As the name implies, the True-Blue Bronx overlaps closely with the real-life borough of the Bronx, except without its northwestern neighborhoods like Riverdale, which are noticeably more progressive than the rest of the borough. (It also takes in North Corona and East Elmhurst’s Assembly district in Queens, just across the East River.) That the Bronx is a safe haven for moderate, even conservative, Democrats won’t come as a surprise to observers of city politics: One of the borough’s best-known politicians is Democrat Rubén Díaz Sr., an anti-abortion city council member who has spoken favorably of former President Donald Trump.

True-Blue Bronx demographics
DEMOGRAPHICPERCENTAGE
White7%
Black29
Hispanic57
Asian5
Bachelor’s degree or higher (among 25+ population)18

White, Black and Asian American residents are non-Hispanic.

SOURCE: AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY

The True-Blue Bronx is predominantly (57 percent) Hispanic, with particularly strong Dominican and Puerto Rican communities. However, there is also a notable non-Hispanic Black population (29 percent), and the East Bronx is pretty racially heterogeneous. Although every district that constitutes the True-Blue Bronx voted more establishment than the city as a whole in all four primaries, progressives tended to do especially badly in more homogenous districts.

With multiple moderates in the mayor’s race, it’s hard to predict how this borough will vote on Tuesday. As the overall front-runner, Adams could do well here, but one recent poll suggested Yang is the preferred candidate of Hispanic voters. Which candidate carries this political borough may well decide who wins the mayoralty.

The Black Bloc

The Black Bloc4 also tends to vote strongly for establishment-aligned candidates. In fact, it gave a higher share of the vote to Clinton (73 percent), James (a whopping 81 percent) and Cuomo (an even more whopping 86 percent) than any other political borough. 

Recent Black Bloc election results
RACECANDIDATEVOTE SHARE
2016 Pres.Clinton73%
Sanders27
2018 Gov.Cuomo86
Nixon14
2018 Lt. Gov.Hochul48
Williams52
2018 Att. Gen.James81
Maloney13
Teachout5

SOURCE: NEW YORK CITY BOARD OF ELECTIONS

But what sets it apart from the True-Blue Bronx is that it also voted for the progressive Williams for lieutenant governor, 52 percent to 48 percent. The likely explanation: Williams, a Black man, enjoyed strong support with New York City’s Black community even as his running mate Nixon and other progressives fizzled with them. And the Black Bloc is heavily (63 percent) non-Hispanic Black.

Black Bloc demographics
DEMOGRAPHICPERCENTAGE
White7%
Black63
Hispanic16
Asian9
Bachelor’s degree or higher (among 25+ population)23

White, Black and Asian American residents are non-Hispanic.

SOURCE: AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY

While virtually every corner of the Black Bloc voted the same way for president, governor and attorney general, Williams ran especially strongly in the western half of this bisected borough: heavily Black, low-income neighborhoods in Brooklyn like East Flatbush and Brownsville. But Hochul (narrowly) carried the eastern half, which comprises middle-class Queens neighborhoods like St. Albans and Queens Village that are more racially diverse. The difference may be because Williams has closer ties to the Brooklyn side of the borough (he grew up in East New York and represented East Flatbush and Canarsie on the City Council).

So the Black Bloc is probably best thought of as a stronghold for establishment Democrats, but one that will vote for members of its community first and foremost. In the mayor’s race, this probably bodes well for Adams, the moderate, Black borough president of Brooklyn. But there may also be an undercurrent of support here for Wiley, who is also Black and lives in Brooklyn.

The Lands of Contradiction

At first glance, the Lands of Contradiction borough5 is an enigma. It voted for Cuomo 71 percent to 28 percent, and it was Hochul’s and Maloney’s strongest political borough. But it was also Sanders’s strongest, voting for Clinton just 55 percent to 45 percent.

Recent Lands of Contradiction election result
RACECANDIDATEVOTE SHARE
2016 Pres.Clinton55%
Sanders45
2018 Gov.Cuomo71
Nixon28
2018 Lt. Gov.Hochul61
Williams38
2018 Att. Gen.James47
Maloney27
Teachout22

SOURCE: NEW YORK CITY BOARD OF ELECTIONS

But this incongruity makes more sense when you think of those votes for Sanders as votes against Clinton. In general, Democrats in the Lands of Contradiction tend to be conservative,6 but they likely voted for Sanders anyway as a form of protest against the national Democratic Party (it’s hard to remember now, but in early 2016, conservatives were a lot more anti-Clinton than they were anti-socialist). This hypothesis is supported by the fact that the Lands of Contradiction was by far Trump’s strongest political borough in the 2020 general election; President Biden carried it just 51 percent to 47 percent, whereas he won at least 80 percent of the vote in the other four political boroughs.

Another way to think about the Lands of Contradiction is that it votes less on ideology and more on a candidate’s brand (much like the Upper East Side, just inverted): Although they live in the biggest city in the nation, voters here consistently reject candidates who represent the urban, urbane Democratic Party and gravitate toward the party’s plain-spoken, industrial and/or rural image of yore. (This is also consistent with its support for Trump.) Hochul and Maloney both hail from upstate New York and grew up in middle-class Irish Catholic families; Sanders is from rustic Vermont and could never be accused of focus-grouping his appearance and messaging. 

Lands of Contradiction demographics
DEMOGRAPHICPERCENTAGE
White46%
Black5
Hispanic19
Asian American26
Bachelor’s degree or higher (among 25+ population)35

White, Black and Asian American residents are non-Hispanic.

SOURCE: AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY

These preferences make sense, given that the Lands of Contradiction is mostly white (46 percent, a plurality of the population) and non-college-educated. Italian and Irish Americans are the largest ethnic groups, although no area may sum up this borough better than the heavily Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods of Borough Park and Midwood, deeply conservative pockets of liberal Brooklyn. In addition, the Lands of Contradiction has sizable Asian American (26 percent) and Hispanic (19 percent) populations. In fact, six of the seven most heavily Asian American Assembly districts in New York City are in this political borough.

Six of the city’s eight oldest Assembly districts (going by median age) are also in the Lands of Contradiction, jibing with its more old-school vision of the Democratic Party. And geographically, the borough covers most of famously contrarian Staten Island as well as the parts of Brooklyn and Queens at the ends of subway lines — in other words, some of the parts of the city that are farthest from Manhattan (and its Elite Circles that the borough so disdains).

This political borough can be unpredictable in who it supports, but look for Adams and/or Yang to rack up votes here. In the Marist poll, Adams was the overwhelming choice of conservative respondents, while several Asian American groups have endorsed Yang, who would be the city’s first Asian American mayor. (As a political outsider, he may also appeal to this borough’s disaffected voters.)

The Crossroads

Crossroads demographics
DEMOGRAPHICPERCENTAGE
White21%
Black30
Hispanic38
Asian American9
Bachelor’s degree or higher (among 25+ population)33

White, Black and Asian American residents are non-Hispanic.

SOURCE: AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY

Recent Crossroads election results
RACECANDIDATEVOTE SHARE
2016 Pres.Clinton62%
Sanders38
2018 Gov.Cuomo67
Nixon33
2018 Lt. Gov.Hochul41
Williams58
2018 Att. Gen.James57
Maloney15
Teachout25

SOURCE: NEW YORK CITY BOARD OF ELECTIONS

Finally, the neighborhoods that make up the Crossroads7 are the parts of the city that don’t fit neatly into one of the other four regions. Often, this is because they sit at the intersection of two or more of the city’s political camps. For instance, the gentrifying Brooklyn neighborhoods of Bedford-StuyvesantCrown Heights and Flatbush are on the boundary of the Black Bloc and the Elite Circles. Black and Hispanic New Yorkers together make up the majority of the Harlem and Washington Heights neighborhoods of Manhattan. And Queens’s Jackson Heights and Corona neighborhoods might make sense in the True-Blue Bronx, with their large Hispanic populations, but their significant Asian American communities help them to vote more like the Lands of Contradiction.

Unsurprisingly, the Crossroads looks a lot like New York City demographically and politically. No racial group constitutes a majority, or even reaches 40 percent of the population; instead, there are roughly similar numbers of Hispanic, Black and white residents. And at the ballot box, it leans toward establishment candidates, but it will vote for progressives under the right circumstances — just like the city as a whole. 

Of course, that’s just on average; different Crossroads neighborhoods vote differently (in general, they vote in between the two political boroughs they are a combination of). By its very nature, the Crossroads doesn’t have as cohesive an identity as the other four political boroughs. But this heterodoxy also makes it the most “New York” of all of them — and therefore the best bellwether of citywide elections. In the mayor’s race, look for all four major candidates to rack up solid support here, since everyone’s bases are represented.


If these five political boroughs sound familiar, it’s because we’ve seen very similar ideological and identity divides play out in recent Democratic primaries nationwide. Since 2016, an ascendant progressive movement has redefined the left wing of the Democratic Party, and it’s been fueled primarily by white voters. But progressives still make up a minority of the party nationwide. After all, Clinton and Biden won the Democratic presidential nominations thanks largely to their strength with Democrats of color. 

That’s the challenge for the aspiring hizzoners who are fighting for New Yorkers’ votes on Tuesday. Because politics has become so nationalized, their support in many ways is predetermined and limited, even as they try to speak to every corner of a city dealing with inequality, segregation, crime, COVID-19 and an unpopular outgoing mayor. In the end, whoever does the best job expanding their coalition beyond their natural base is likely to become New York City’s 110th mayor.

East Harlem by Afinelyne

https://www.etsy.com/listing/655893661/east-harlem-map?share_time=1623184938000

Lynn Lieberman is an Artist/Writer at GothamToGo Follow her paintbrush @ http://gothamtogo.com or Facebook at GothamToGoNew York, NYgothamtogo.com

Also see more of Lynn’s amazing work here:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/afinelyne?ref=simple-shop-header-name&listing_id=655893661

Seen on Park Avenue

The Lee Building

Founded in 1900, Lee Brothers Storage & Van Co. – a furniture, storage, and moving company – was initially located on 125th Street near 3rd avenue.

In 1913 they moved to the northeast corner of 125th Street and Park Ave. into a building they did not build but leased. However, after 9 years in 1922 they purchased the building at 125th St. and Park Ave. which would henceforth bare the name “The Lee Building”.

In 1925 two stories in the New York Times described the sale of this same building:

“The most interesting transaction in a great many years in Harlem has just been closed. It involves the sale of the Lee Building on the northeast corner of Park Avenue and 125th Street. This is a twelve-story fireproof office and warehouse building on plot 90 by 100. … The Lee Building was originally owned by the Pittsburgh Life Insurance Company who, in 1913, leased it for twenty-one years to Lee Brothers Storage and Warehouse Company, a young and growing concern. On the failure of the Pittsburgh Life Insurance Company, this property, among other assets, was taken over by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, who, in 1922, sold to Lee Brothers. Originally the building was almost entirely used for furniture storage, but gradually Lee Brothers have converted about a third into offices, with retail stores on the ground floor. …” (NYT 3 May 1925, pg. RE17).

“A syndicate represented by Robert B. Bowler bought from Lee Brothers the twelve-story structure at the northeast corner of 125th Street and Park Avenue, opposite the Harlem station of the New York Central. … The sellers are furniture dealers, who occupy the lower section of the building. They purchased the property in March, 1922… It was built by the Hamilton Storage Company and was later converted into offices.” (NYT 9 August 1925, pg. 40).

The Lee company also built a “beautifully detailed, classically inspired building, erected in 1929, (that) was designed as a furniture warehouse and has remained just that. … The warehouse was originally built and owned by Lee Brothers, whose name is still visible beneath layers of paint on the Riverside Drive facade (at 135th Street)”.

The founder of Lee Bros. was Charles Lee (1853-1953).

This ad for Lee Brothers Inc. appeared in The Christian Science Monitor, 1932, and showed the columned facade at Riverside Drive and 134th St.

This image, dated 1920, on the New York Public Library’s Digital Collections shows a Lee Bros sign on their building at 125th St. and Park Ave.

This later image, dated 1934, on the NYPL’s Digital Collections shows a veritcal Lee Bros sign on the same 125th St. building seen from the opposite direction

Parks Department, Made in India

The New York City Parks Department has access covers (manholes) cast specifically for use in NYC Parks.

You can, of course, see the text and their leaf logo on this one (above). Note however that the casting is not American, it was done in India:

Which leads me to highly, highly recommend a short film (with a brilliant title) Cast in India:

Which I guarantee will have you thinking about manhole covers in a completely different way.

A Lighthouse in East Harlem?

East Harlem is a neighborhood that never ceases to surprise. While most New Yorkers know of the The Little Red Lighthouse (and the big grey bridge) up in Washington Heights, the lighthouse pictured above gets much less (media) attention.

The metal lighthouse is 1/2 mile from the Harlem River and rather than warn people to stay away, it actually is intended to attract.

El Faro (The Lighthouse) is a part of SCAN New York, and is a community center in junior high school 45 at the corner of 120th Street and 1st Avenue.

Harlem Libraries are Open!

Shelf-browsing will be capped at limited periods of time, and computers can be accessed by appointment, the New York Public Library said in a news release. All patrons must wear masks, maintain social distancing and respect the time limits.

A Literary Mayoral Candidate

As most New Yorkers know by now, there are far, far too many people running for Mayor of NYC. All this, plus Ranked Choice Voting, is making for a confusing primary this coming June.

Interestingly, one of the candidates has a book credit to his name. A number of years ago, while Manhattan’s Borough President, Scott Stringer edited a book on healthy eating and recipes.

The book – Go Green East Harlem – is a fun, modest cookbook and guide and the only published work I know of from the current array of candidates.

Community Districts

East Harlem has many commonalities with the South Bronx in terms of population, history, infrastructure, and governmental relations.

A map of the density of opioid treatment programs (as licensed by OASAS) shows the clear linkage.

Note how CB11 (East Harlem) has the largest opioid capacity in New York City. OASAS has packed programs in East Harlem repeatedly and forced East Harlem to serve addicted New Yorkers who reside in the gray areas on the map.

To view an interactive version of the map (hover over a community district to learn the opioid capacity and district number), see below:

West 124th Street Library

Landmarks has recently moved closer to landmarking the NYPL on West 124th Street on the north side of Marcus Garvey Park.

Completed in 1909 and funded by Andrew Carnegie, the branch “nurtured African-American cultural and intellectual life, especially during the Harlem Renaissance,” said Timothy Frye, the LPC’s director of special projects.

The library once housed the groundbreaking Rose McClendon Players theater group and is the only one of Harlem’s five Carnegie libraries that has not been designated a city landmark.

The beautiful limestone facade has faced the park for decades. High up, however, you might have noticed that there are 4 open books, carved into the limestone. While my photo (below) isn’t clear enough to show the books in detail, they are not blank books.

Each of the left-hand pages begins with the alphabet, has some text and: “This New York Public Library, No. 37, Will Contain Wholesome Books.”

The carving also includes “What Boy Cut Letters On These Pages To Give Texture To the Surfaces,” and “Why Does It Matter. Drawing The Whole. Lamkin Robson,” followed by however much of the alphabet would fit. The ending on the western-most book is ”Does It Matter? Drawing These, Patrick Clune. Where Does Reason Commence [Illegible] Does End.”

And there are more oddities. In some of the text on the left side of the spreads, you find the word ”Paddy,” in others ”Benny.”

East Harlem vs. UES

NY1 has an interesting article on disparities between East Harlem and the Upper East Side.

Below 96th Street, more than a quarter of all adults have been fully vaccinated for COVID-19. 

Above it, about 13% are fully immunized — and there are fewer than half as many sites at which to get the vaccine, including sites at local pharmacies.  

In East Harlem, COVID death rates for the pandemic are more than triple that of the Upper East Side, according to city data. One of its ZIP codes, 10035, has the highest death rate in the borough. 

The map (below) is somewhat difficult to parse, but essentially the intensity of the red color indicates COVID-19 death rates, whereas the percentages shown in the 3 zip codes, indicates what percentage of residents have been vaccinated.

For the full article, see:

https://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/news/2021/03/18/new-program-could-help-bridge-vaccine-divide-in-east-harlem

Time to Check Your Voter Registration

Nothing shows someone you care more than making sure your voter registration information is up to date (maybe that’s just me!).

Valentine’s Day is the last day to update your voter registration information for citywide elections. To make sure the Board of Election receives your request, it’s best to check your information TODAYClick here to check your voter registration information!

If you plan to vote by mail, it is especially important that you check that your address is current. Additionally, only voters registered as Democrats in Manhattan can vote in the Democratic Primaries, including for Manhattan DA (June 22!), so make sure to confirm your party affiliation.

Now, will you spread the love and ensure your friends will be eligible to vote for a better, more fair Manhattan, too? Forward this email along!

(Thank you to Tali Farhadian-Weinstein for this timely PSA)

Latest (Pre-COVID) Data

One of the depressing things about looking at the data from the New York State Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) is that it repeatedly tells the same story – for decades, OASAS has packed substance abuse programs into Harlem and East Harlem; programs that wealthier and often whiter communities have successfully rebuffed.

OASAS has exploited the weak political resistance of Harlem elected officials, and the generosity of spirit in Harlem, both of which permitted OASAS to successfully lie to the community by repeatedly stating that programs in Harlem were for our neighbors, our family members, or our colleagues.

The data, however, shows unequivocally that opioid treatment programs in East Harlem are not used by East Harlem residents. They are used by men and women who have to commute into our community because our political representatives do not have the spine to demand local, small-scale treatment programs in all New York City neighborhoods.

Only 18% of the men and women you see lined up to get methadone in our community, live in East Harlem. The rest commute here.

This big lie, told by OASAS and repeated by our elected officials, can also be seen in the graph, below, which shows how the capacity of opioid treatment programs in East Harlem far, far exceeds even our community’s addiction rate.

This tremendous gap between the size of the programs in East Harlem and our addiction rate shows how programs in East Harlem were not built for East Harlem residents, they were built to serve people who live in other communities.

The data presented here is from March 1st, 2019 to February 28th, 2020 (just before the COVID pandemic took hold).

New York State Senator Brian Benjamin Sponsors a Harlem COVID-19 Vaccine Town Hall

Dear Neighbor,
This pandemic has been hard on the country and has been disproportionately deadly to Black and Latino populations. Additionally, people of color in America have historically been subjected to severe medical mistreatment. So, it is only natural that some of our neighbors may have fears and reservations about receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. I am committed to ensuring that our community knows that the COVID-19 vaccine is: Here, Safe, Effective, and Free!
It is essential and life-saving for those in our community to be sufficiently informed about the vaccine, especially the most vulnerable among us, and for those in our community to have equal and equitable access to the vaccine. To inform you and to answer your questions about the vaccine, please join me and a panel of medical experts, government leaders, and a few of our Harlem neighbors who have taken the vaccine for a “Harlem COVID-19 Vaccine Town Hall.” The event sponsors and I are doing this to ensure that our community is not left behind or left in the dark regarding this vital, life-saving tool to counter COVID-19.
Join us to receive accurate information about the COVID-19 vaccine, so we can all play our part to help our community to be healthy and safe.
WHEN:Friday, February 195:30PM
WHERE:ZOOMTo RSVP, register athttps://bit.ly/vaccinetownhall1
CLICK HERE TO RSVP




Brian A. BenjaminNew York State Senator