TODAY’s September HNBA Gathering Will Be At 6 PM, At East 129th Street and 5th Avenue

Today – September 13th (Tuesday) at 6:00 – you’re invited to gather at East 129th Street and 5th Avenue (south-east corner) to celebrate the unveiling of Ann Petry Place.

The acclaimed African-American author, Ann Petry, lived at 2 East 129th Street when she engaged in much of her activist writing for African American newspapers such as The Amsterdam News and The People’s Voice, and The Crisis. 2 East 129th Street was also her home when she wrote the seminal novel: The Street.

This novel, The Street, was the first novel by an African-American woman to sell a staggering 1.5 million copies. With time, The Street has become a canonical text that continues to be widely read throughout the United States as a literary exploration of the grinding and oppressive impact that systemic racism and sexism in mid-century America had on Harlem residents, and African-American women in particular.

Ann Petry stands as a crucial bridge between activists and writers from the Harlem Renaissance with those of Harlem’s Civil Rights and Black Power movements of the 1950’s and beyond.

The gathering will include Manhattan Borough President, Mark Levine, the Chair of Community Board 11, and the Chair of Uptown Grand Central.

After presenting Liz Petry with a copy of the street sign that will be unveiled tomorrow, The Harlem Rose Garden (next to Ann Petry’s former apartment building) will open and present a musical selection for all to enjoy.

Come out and meet new (and vintage) HNBA members as we gather outdoors, together.

CB11 To Hold Injection Site Conversation, Tonight

The Department of Health and Mental Hygene will attend CB11’s meeting tonight at 6:00 PM. There will be a focus on the injection site in East Harlem and the impact this facility has had on open-air drug use and dealing in our community.

Click the link, below, to register and ask your questions or offer your opinion:

https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_L95XpSZ5SfOTlalOdt9zhQ

Tuesday’s September HNBA Gathering Will Be At 6 PM, At East 129th Street and 5th Avenue

Next week – September 13th (Tuesday) at 6:00 – you’re invited to gather at East 129th Street and 5th Avenue (southeast corner) to celebrate the unveiling of Ann Petry Place.

The acclaimed African-American author, Ann Petry, lived at 2 East 129th Street when she engaged in much of her activist writing for African American newspapers such as The Amsterdam News and The People’s Voice, and The Crisis. 2 East 129th Street was also her home when she wrote the seminal novel: The Street.

This novel, The Street, was the first novel by an African-American woman to sell a staggering 1.5 million copies. With time, The Street has become a canonical text that continues to be widely read throughout the United States as a literary exploration of the grinding and oppressive impact that systemic racism and sexism in mid-century America had on Harlem residents, and African-American women in particular.

Ann Petry stands as a crucial bridge between activists and writers from the Harlem Renaissance with those of Harlem’s Civil Rights and Black Power movements of the 1950’s and beyond.

The gathering will include Manhattan Borough President, Mark Levine, the Chair of Community Board 11, and the Chair of Uptown Grand Central.

After presenting Liz Petry (Ann’s surviving daughter) with a copy of the street sign that will be unveiled tomorrow, The Harlem Rose Garden (next to Ann Petry’s former apartment building) will open and present a musical selection for all to enjoy.

Come out and meet new (and vintage) HNBA members as we gather outdoors, together.

Save the Date!

On September 13th (Tuesday) at 6:00, we’ll gather at East 129th Street and 5th Avenue (south-east corner) to celebrate the unveiling of Ann Petry Place.

The acclaimed African-American author, Ann Petry, lived at 2 East 129th Street when she engaged in much of her activist writing for African American newspapers such as The Amsterdam News and The People’s Voice, and The Crisis. 2 East 129th Street was also her home when she wrote the seminal novel: The Street.

This novel, The Street, was the first novel by an African-American woman to sell a staggering 1.5 million copies. With time, The Street has become a canonical text that continues to be widely read throughout the United States as a literary exploration of the grinding and oppressive impact that systemic racism and sexism in mid-century America had on Harlem residents, and African-American women in particular.

Ann Petry stands as a crucial bridge between activists and writers from the Harlem Renaissance with those of Harlem’s Civil Rights and Black Power movements of the 1950’s and beyond.

We hope you will plan on attending the unveiling and meet Liz Petry, Ann Petry’s daughter, as well as a number of your local officials.

Bethel Gospel Assembly’s 119th Street Side

A dedication to the school that is now the Bethel Gospel Assembly Church, on East 119th Street.

Below is a view of the church from Marcus Garvey Park (looking south, across 120th Street:

Thinking About Solar?

Paid Focus Group Opportunity
Funded by the DOE’s Solar Energy Technologies Office, Solstice Initiative has designed a research to help better understand the barriers that low to moderate-income populations face when accessing community solar. Findings from this research will grant more insights on community preferences in community solar, thus leading to a more inclusive and equitable community-solar landscape. Participants will join focus groups of 6-8 people for 2 hours and be compensated with $125. If interested, email [email protected].

Be Prepared

Cooler Kit Distribution

Wednesday, July 20 at 10am 105 East 116th St.Outside of Diana Ayala’s office

Cooler Kits will be distributed to the community to spread awareness of Extreme Heat and preparedness for Blackouts

Flyer attached below. While supplies last.


Test Kit Distribution

Wednesday, July 20 at 1pm*

With numbers increasing once again, The EHCOAD will be distributing Covid 19 Test Kits and masks.

Email: eastharlemcoa[email protected]

Fire Safety

Thursday July 21st at 4pm-Virtual

We will have a Fire Safety Seminar so that our community can learn ways to be safer and prepared in case of a Fire Emergency.

Zoom Link Here

Block Party on Saturday, July 23rd

East 129 (between Madison and 5th Avenue)

11 1/2

With a facade of only nine and a half feet wide, 75 1/2 Bedford Street is the narrowest house in New York City. The interior space is even cozier, at its widest, 8 feet 7 inches, and at its narrowest, only 2 feet. Some sources suggest it was constructed in 1873 on what was a former carriage entranceway, while others believe the narrow home dates to earlier in the century.

In the late 19th century the building was home to a cobbler’s shop and candy factory. In 1923 the building was leased (with its surrounding neighbors) by a group of artists and actors, who established the Cherry Lane Theatre around the corner. Poet and playwright Edna St. Vincent Millay and her husband moved into the building in 1923 and only stayed a year. During their tenure, the building, which was constructed in a typical Italianate style with a cornice at the top, was renovated. Architect Ferdinand Savignano installed a skylight and made the top floor a studio for Millay. The original cornice was removed, and a small Dutch stepped gable was added (possibly as a reflection of the Dutch heritage of Millay’s husband). According to numerous accounts, the house also was the residence (however briefly) to cartoonist William Steig, his sister-in-law anthropologist Margaret Mead, and actors John Barrymore and Cary Grant.

The building was purchased in 1952 by a Greenwich Village local (saving it from redevelopment) and sold and renovated a number of times since the mid-1990s. It was sold in 2013 for $3.25 million.

Homes with fractional addresses are quaint historical reminders of how messy development and human systems (postal routes, zoning, building, etc.) often are.

The NY post had a great article on how many of those 1/2’s came to be:

https://nypost.com/2018/11/07/the-origins-of-new-york-citys-mysterious-fractional-addresses/

but one thing it fails to mention is Harlem’s fractional address, 11 1/2 East 129th Street.

In this case, it’s not a quirk in a postal route, a small lot built inexplicably, or anything like that, it’s simply to avoid the unlucky number 13 in the way that many taller buildings go from the 12th to 14th floor, somehow.

The Historic Districts Council Weigh In

The Historic Districts Council (HDC) reviews every public proposal affecting New York City’s landmarks and historic districts and provides testimony to the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) whenever it is needed. Below are their comments regarding the Church of All Saints Parish House:

47 East 129th Street – Church of All Saints (Roman Catholic), Parish House and School – Individual Landmark CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, LPC-22-01916A Italian Gothic Revival style parish house/rectory designed by Renwick, Aspinwall & Russell and built in 1886-1889, as part of an Italian Gothic Revival style ecclesiastical complex. Application is to alter the stoop and install a barrier-free access lift.  Architect: Renwick, Aspinwall & Russell  HDC finds the option with a lower concrete base and increased decorative ironwork to be the favorable design choice. It is more visually stimulating and creates a nicer relationship with the rest of the entryway. However, it should be ensured that the quality and detail of any additional ironwork matches that of the existing.  

47 East 129th Street – Church of All Saints (Roman Catholic), Parish House and School – Individual Landmark CERTIFICATE OF APPROPRIATENESS, LPC-22-01916A Italian Gothic Revival style parish house/rectory designed by Renwick, Aspinwall & Russell and built in 1886-1889, as part of an Italian Gothic Revival style ecclesiastical complex. Application is to alter the stoop and install a barrier-free access lift.  Architect: Renwick, Aspinwall & Russell  HDC finds the option with a lower concrete base and increased decorative ironwork to be the favorable design choice. It is more visually stimulating and creates a nicer relationship with the rest of the entryway. However, it should be ensured that the quality and detail of any additional ironwork matches that of the existing.  

August Primaries will be held for the State Senate and US House of Representatives.

How To Apply For An Absentee Ballot
Deadline MONDAY 8/8/22; BUT DON’T DELAY Request by FRIDAY 8/5/22

Absentee Ballot Application portal: https://absenteeballot.elections.ny.gov/
OR go in person to your local county board of elections Deadline 8/22/22
Note: You can request an absentee ballot even if you are NOT going away. EVERYONE is eligible to request an absentee ballot due to a temporary illness (including being unable to appear due to the risk of contracting or spreading a communicable disease).

How to Submit An Absentee Ballot
Put it in the mail ensuring it receives a postmark no later than August 23rd.
Bring it to your County Board of Elections Office no later than August 23rd by 9 pm.
Bring it to an early voting poll site in your county between August 13th and August 21st.
Bring it to a poll site in your county on August 23rd by 9 pm.

East 129th Street Renamed: Ann Petry Place

After years of work, petitioning, and navigating bureaucratic morass, the renaming of East 129th Street has finally been approved. East 129th Street (at 5th Avenue) will be renamed Ann Petry Place. Ann Petry was a celebrated Black author whose novel, The Street, became the first novel by a Black woman to sell over a million copies.

Petry’s interest in the lived experience of Black Harlemites, and Black Americans as a whole, brought the difficult and constrained choices to an enthusiastic readership.

Petry lived at 2 East 129th Street while she wrote The Street, and the super and his dog who are charaters in the novel, are said to be modeled on Ann Petry’s real life super and his dog.

Patch is also reporting that Harlem and East Harlem had a number of co-named streets approved. To see Nick Garber’s full list, click here:

https://patch.com/new-york/harlem/16-harlem-streets-get-new-names-cicely-tyson-way-dinkins-drive

Celebrate 3 Kings at El Museo

45th Annual Three Kings Day (Hybrid) Celebration KICK-OFF!Saturday, December 18 – Sunday, December 19, 2021
FREE ADMISSION
El Museo de Barrio is excited to kick-off its Three Kings Day Celebration at the Harlem Night Market this weekend! Our theme this year is Somos el Cambio: Protecting the Environment for Future Generations, honoring the work of those who call on us to sustainably steward our environment, and help foster cultural transformation through community empowerment and artistic expression. Details for January 6th coming soon!
We invite you all to support local businesses, enjoy live music, and community at La Marqueta (116th St and Park Ave). Proof of vaccination and ID required to enter indoor spaces, as well as face coverings. Activities include:
PARRANDA EN EL BARRIO!Saturday, December 18 | 4pm – 5pmEl Barrio and La Marqueta (116th St and Park Ave) Get your maracas and join El Museo and Los Pleneros de la 21 as we kick off our Three Kings Day Celebration with a parranda along East 116th Street ending in a lively performance at the Harlem Night Market at La Marqueta. Organized by the New York City Economic Development Corporation, Union Settlement, and Uptown Grand Central, the event brings together dozens of local vendors from East Harlem and beyond. Proof of vaccination and ID required to enter indoor spaces.  
MANOS A LA OBRA: Crown-Making Workshop 4pm – 6pm (December 18) & 3pm – 6pm (December 19)Urban Garden Center at 116th St and Park AveCalling all Kings (and Queens), get your crowns ready for El Museo’s Three Kings Day (Hybrid) Celebration! Join the Museum’s artist educators for a crown-making workshop for all ages at the Urban Garden Center’s Family Tent, part of the Harlem Night Market. Create your own jeweled headdress to wear on January 6th. 

Summer of Soul, Tonight!

Head to the Harlem Rose Garden tonight at dusk for a screening of Summer of Soul. The Harlem Rose Garden (East 129th Street at 5th Avenue) is a gorgeous oasis and cultural hub for the community. Bring bug spray and get ready for one of the best films of the year.

Tomorrow, also feel free to drop by the Harlem Rose Garden to participate in Harlem Week’s evening of the Harlem Swing Society starting at 7 PM (Friday). The event: “A Taste of The Harlem Renaissance”  includes dance performances, dance lessons and a rare film of the 1920s – 50s Harlem.

And here are more great events at Harlem Rose Garden:

Bedbugs!

Yikes!

How Calculated: Estimated number of adults reporting a problem with bed bugs that required an exterminator, in the past 12 months, divided by the number of adults, expressed as a percent

Source: New York City Community Health Survey (CHS)