Metropolitan Hospital’s Flood Wall Resiliency Project

On May 25, 2022, the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC), NYC Health + Hospitals, New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services Commissioner Jackie Bray, and community members broke ground for a new flood protection system project at NYC Health + Hospitals/Metropolitan in East Harlem. 

The project includes a perimeter flood wall and an upgraded storm water pumping system. The wall will vary in height from eight to twelve feet, and includes resilient floodgates of up to 35 feet wide. The system is designed to keep out water from the hospital campus, which will allow for minimized damage and continued operations in the event of a major storm. Additional improvements will be made to protect loading docks, and to lighting, erosion control, fire protection and security. The basement walls will be hardened and areas of the hospital campus will be reconfigured to support these new features. 

Local artist Miguel Luciano was selected by a committee from NYCEDC, Health + Hospitals, the Department of Cultural Affairs and community members to create artwork for the design of the flood wall. The artwork will integrate infrastructure improvements into the community. 

The project is expected to cost $120 million and will be funded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Construction is expected to go until summer 2024. For updates on the project, click here

Mayor Eric Adams stated, “The climate crisis is here, and we must ensure that New York City is ready for more frequent and more extreme weather events, especially at critical infrastructure sites, like our hospitals. This flood resiliency project shows federal, state, and city government partnership at its best — getting stuff done to protect New Yorkers. This flood wall will ensure the health care heroes at NYC Health + Hospitals/Metropolitan can continue fully serving their patients and helping them get better for generations to come.”

NYC Health + Hospitals/Metropolitan Chief Executive Office Cristina Contreras stated, “We are grateful for the partnership with both the federal and local government to build a stronger and more resilient protection for our hospital. This comprehensive and innovative infrastructure project will mitigate the weaknesses exposed by Superstorm Sandy and provide our staff with the peace of mind of knowing that if we should experience any future natural weather disasters, the hospital and the community will be protected, and they can focus on what they do best – providing high-quality care for our patients and their families.”

Fathers’ Day is Harlem’s Skyscraper Classic Day

On June 19th, come out to Marcus Garvey Park to watch top talent in cycling do fast-paced loops in Harlem’s Skyscraper Classic Race.

This will be the 47th running of this cycling race.

The excitement starts at 9 and goes to 4pm

Say Their Names 2022

KICK-OFF THE JUNETEETH WEEKEND AT MARCUS GARVEY PARK!

Friday, June 17th
12-3 PM on NW lawn
New York Public Library, Harlem Branch and Studio Museum in Harlem,
with children’s storytime, giveaways and tour/talk about the Thomas J. Price
sculpture curated by the Studio Museum. 

3:15 – 7:30 PM“Say Their Names” by Poet Gold, Suprina & Sounds of Heritage
In recognition of the lives taken by racism including those recently lost in Buffalo, NY and
Uvalde, Texas. Interactive workshops, Silent Processional through the park, and on-stage
performance preceding film screening. Co-sponsors Marcus Garvey Park Alliance and NYC Parks

SPECIFIC DETAILS FOR JUNE 17

3:15 – 4:00 & 4:15 – 5 PM Walkway outside NW Lawn – Look for Themis the 9 foot Puppet. 
Poet Gold’s Dream Out Loud poetry workshop designed to explore how one can be a “Beacon of Change” in the face of oppression and to create poetry that fosters empowerment and raises the voice for social equity. Participants are encouraged to address loss by adding the names of those lost due to racist acts to the cape of Themis, a giant 9 ft. living sculpture created by artist, Suprina.

6 – 7 PM DJ Boogie Blind

7:00 PM Procession line-up Walkway outside NW lawn

Community members line-up for silent procession through the park with Themis wearing the cape on which names from the workshops were added led by Poet Gold, Suprina, and Sounds of Heritage.

7:25 PM PROCESSIONAL arrives in orchestra pit of the Amphitheater

7:30 PM Pre Performance on stage by Poet Gold and Sounds Of Heritage

8 PM at Amphitheater Outdoor screening of Questlove’s Oscar®-winning documentary, “Summer of Soul,” presented by Capital One City Parks Foundation SummerStage.

Saturday, June 18th

12-3 PM at NW lawn   NYPL Harlem and Studio Museum with children’s storytime,
giveaways and tour/talk about the Thomas J. Price sculpture. 

5:30 – 6:30 PM at Richard Rodgers Amphitheater   
Pre-show conversation with the Federation of Black Cowboys and come meet their horses 

7 PM at Amphitheater  CROSS THAT RIVER
Join the Federation of Black Cowboys and the Federation of Black Cowboys and then Harlem’s own star Allan Harris – globally- renowned for his jazz vocals, guitar and songwriting
in the music & theatrical storytelling of Blu, who runs away from slavery to become a cowboy out west.
Did you know that 1 in 4 cowboys were Black men? Presented by NYC ParksCity College Center for the ArtsJazzmobile and Love Productions.

Drinking Soda

How Calculated: 

Estimated number of adults who, on average reported having consumed one or more sugary drinks per day, divided by all adults in the area; expressed as a percent. Sugary drinks include soda, sweetened iced tea, sports drinks, fruit punch, and other fruit flavored drinks. (One drink equals 12 ounces). Diet soda, sugar free drinks, 100% juice, and seltzer are not included.

Source: New York City Community Health Survey (CHS)

Photoville in East Harlem

Head to the East Harlem waterfront (the Esplanade) between 100-102nd Streets to see a free Photoville exhibit of photography:

Enter on 96th, 103rd, or 111th Streets.

Free Bike Helmets

Free bike helmets for you or your kids! Saturday at 54th and 11th Ave. 11:30-2:30.

Speaking of Cycling…

The Daily News reports:

Manhattan Democratic chair Keith Wright doored cyclist in Harlem, fled scene: ‘It’s his fault for running into my door’

Prosecutors in Manhattan have charged the borough’s top Democrat with dooring a cyclist in Harlem and fleeing the scene, according to court papers.

Keith Wright, the current leader of the New York County Democrats, opened the door to his BMW around 9:15 p.m. Aug. 26 while parked on Fifth Ave. and E. 138th St., hitting an oncoming cyclist, according to the criminal complaint.

After the cyclist fell from his bike and lay injured in the street, Wright sped off without leaving his name, number, or insurance policy — or offering to bring the victim to the hospital, prosecutors said at Wright’s Friday arraignment in Manhattan Criminal Court.

When authorities tracked down Wright almost two weeks later, the former Harlem state assemblyman fessed up and agreed to surrender.

“I was about to open my car door while he was riding an electric bike. It is his fault for running into my door,” Wright told NYPD Det. Lamount Deaderick, according to the complaint.

“I told him to go to the hospital. I did not exchange my information with him. I asked for his information but he did not give it to me.”

At the arraignment, Wright pleaded not guilty to two counts of leaving the scene and was released by a judge. He’s due back in court Oct. 10.

It’s illegal in New York to open a car door into the path of another road user, and “dooring” has claimed a number of New Yorkers’ lives in recent years.

In January 2019, Brooklyn bagel deliveryman Hugo Alexander Sinto Garcia died on his way to work riding along Third Ave. in Sunset Park when a cabbie opened his car door, sending Sinto flying out onto the road and into the path of another vehicle.

And in April 2018, Juan Pacheco, 57, was pedaling down LaSalle St. near Broadway in west Harlem when the driver of a Nissan Quest threw open his door, fatally throwing the father of three from his bike onto the road.

City Aims To Spend $776 Million To Complete Manhattan Greenway

Harlem would get two new connectors that would allow families, joggers, and cyclists to ride around Manhattan, traffic free.

This is a huge project that involves years of engineering and environmental impact analysis, but it really could be a game-changer for enaging with the waterfront in a car-free environment.

See the article below, for more:

https://gothamist.com/news/city-aims-spend-776-million-complete-manhattan-greenway-according-report

Join Concrete Safaris on Friday

On August 13th, youth interns (ages 14-24) enrolled in the Outdoor Play Cohort at Concrete Safaris’ Outdoor Leadership Academy will host JungleGym 2021 Summer Series, a NYC Open Streets event, celebrating its 14th birthday party and 9th annual obstacle race and active living fair on East 106th Street between Lexington and Third Avenues. A 20-obstacle race and active living fair for children (ages 5+) and their families will run from 1:00 to 5:00pm.

The Youth Host Photo Expo & Streetscape Garden Tour will take place on Friday, August 13th from 10:00am to 1:00pm on Second Avenue between 112th and 115th Streets.

In addition, Youth Host Virtual Photo Expo will take place on the same day from 2:00 to 5:00pm.

This event will bring youth interns (ages 14-24) enrolled in the Gardening & Health Media Cohorts at Concrete Safaris’ Outdoor Leadership Academy to host an Outdoor Photo Expo and Streetscape Garden Tour at Jefferson Gardens at Jefferson Houses, 300 East 115th Street in East Harlem. In addition, an online Photo Expo at concrete safaris.org will take place from 2:00 to 5:00pm.

28th Precinct’s Build the Block – Friday

A Great Day in Harlem on Thursday!

The Celebration of this historic street co-naming event will take place on Thursday, August 12th from 2:00 to 4:00pm. The entrance for guests will be at East 126th Street between Madison and Fifth Avenues. Click here to Register. This is a free event.

“Uptown is proud to honor the deep-rooted history of jazz here in Harlem, along with the visionary man who conceived and took this iconic photo more than 60 years ago,” shared Diane Collier, Chair of Uptown Grand Central. “Along with the Harlem/East Harlem residents, we are pleased to memorialize this wonderful event with a street sign on the block where it all happened.”

Harlem Week is On

Find out more about fantastic Harlem Week events here:

https://www.harlemweek.com/2021schedule

Black Women Bicycling

Photo: Baltimore Afro-American newspaper, 1928. Addison Scurlock, photographer. Photographcourtesy of the Smithsonian Institution.

NMAAHC historian, Marya McQuirter, uncovered this amazing story about five black women who biked cross-country in the mid-1900s while working on her PhD dissertation. 

Nearly 87 years ago, five friends; Marylou JacksonVelva JacksonEthyl MillerLeolya Nelson and Constance White biked from New York to Washington, DC during Easter weekend. 

In 1928, these five black women biked over 250 miles in three days — an unusual feat for black women at the time. They started out on the morning of Good Friday in Manhattan, where they all lived, and biked 100 miles (a century in bike terms) to Philadelphia. They spent the night at the Philadelphia Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA). On Saturday morning, they biked 40 miles to Wilmington, where they spent the night, and on the morning of Easter Sunday, they arrived at the nation’s capital. While in DC, they did some sightseeing on the National Mall and at Howard University. And they also posed for the above photograph in front of the Washington Tribune newspaper building at 922 U Street, NW. Addison Scurlock, founder and owner of the popular Scurlock Studio, was the photographer. Scurlock was known for documenting the life of African Americans in the nation’s capital.  

To learn about the history of the Scurlock Studio, check out the National Museum of African American History and Culture’s exhibit, The Scurlock Studio and Black Washington: Picturing the Promise.

image

Photo: “Phillis Wheatley YWCA” by AgnosticPreachersKid – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

They spent the night at the Phillis Wheatley YWCA at 901 Rhode Island Ave, NW. The next day they returned to Manhattan via train.  

These women made a conscious decisions to master one of the 19th century’s foremost technological advances for pleasure, mobility, sport and visibility.

I’ve collected some quotes from the cyclists about their journey: 

  • On pleasure: when asked why they took the trip, they responded that it was for the “love of the great out-of doors.”
  • On mobility:  they chose the bicycle as their vehicle for traveling ‘down south’ at the same time that when women, men and children were fleeing the south to escape white terror
  • On sports:  they challenged women 21 years and older to replicate their trip in less time
  • On visibility:  they wanted their feat to be shared with the masses, hence securing features in the Baltimore Afro-American, the New York Age and the Washington Tribune newspapers.

And to this latter point, they weren’t the only ones. I have found dozens of examples of other black women with bicycles who have sought visibility, whether through studio portraits, family photographs, publicity shots, vacation pictures and more.  

image

Photo:Howard University coeds use bicycles to teach elementary school students how to calculate the circumference of a circle. c. 1930s Addison Scurlock, photographer. Photograph courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution.

I have been inspired by the 5 cyclists to share the larger story of individuals who mobilized multiple technologies—bicycles and photography—for their own needs. To that end, I am curating a book of historical photographs of black women and bicycles, from the 1880s to the present.

Written by Marya McQuirter., Historian, Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. 

APPLY NOW APPLY APPLY NOW FREE AIR-CONDITIONERS 

CALL  212-331-3126 for immediate assistance to have your AC installed 
Priority given to residents who have one or more of these risk factors: 

Chronic health conditions including:
◻ Cardiovascular or respiratory disease
◻ Obesity (BMI > 30) 
◻ Diabetes 
◻ Chronic mental illness 
◻ Cognitive or developmental disorder

Have difficulty thermoregulating
◻ Diuretics 
◻ Anticholinergics 
◻ Neuroleptics 
◻ Drug or alcohol misuse 
◻ Socially isolated or with limited mobility
CASH ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE; 
Applicants who meet income requirements, receive SNAP benefits, or other criteria can apply for cash payments from the NY State Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP) to purchase and install an air conditioner. These are available now until August 31, 2021.Applications can be printed or will be mailed to the person. Completed applications must be mailed to NYC Human Resources Administration (HRA). At this time, HEAP funds cannot be used to pay electric utility costs.
CALL  212-331-3126 
for immediate assistance 
to have your AC installed 

YOU CAN HELP BY: 
✓Encouraging heat-vulnerable people without air conditioners to call 311 or the HEAP Conference Line at 212-331-3126 to ask for a HEAP cooling assistance application.

The application can also be downloaded at: https://www1.nyc.gov/site/hra/help/energy-assistance.page.

✓Provide the required written documentation of increased risk for heat-related illness due to a medical or psychiatric condition or use of medications that increases risk. CALL  212-331-3126 
for immediate assistance 
to have your AC installed 
For Additional Assistance

March for Homeless Rights

George Floyd

One year ago.

Born: October 14, 1973, Fayetteville, NC

Died: May 25, 2020, Minneapolis, MN

Bicycle Lane Density

The percent of streets with bike lanes can affect cyclist and pedestrian safety, physical activity, and sustainable transportation use. 

 About the Measure

Bicycle Network Coverage – Percent of Streets with Bicycle Lanes 

Percentage of streets with bicycle lanes (conventional and protected bicycle lanes, excluding sharrows, dirt trails, boardwalks, and velodrome tracks).

Source: New York City Department of Transportation

Cyclists Killed by Drivers

In Manhattan, nearly 30 percent of streets have bike lanes – but in Brooklyn, only 13 percent of streets do. This is consistent with research that shows that bicycle networks offer protection to people on the streets.

Safety in numbers

The idea of “safety in numbers” comes from a study that found that “a motorist is less likely to collide with a person walking and bicycling if more people walk or bicycle.” This is probably because as the number of people walking and cycling increases, motorists become more attentive. So as the number of cyclists rises, we expect to see injury rates go down.

Ongoing work to promote cycling will help lower injury rates. Expanding bike share networks, increasing bicycle network coverage, and continuing to build protective street environments – like separated bike lanes – can get more riders on the street and offer them greater protection.

This effect is apparent when we look at differences between Manhattan and Brooklyn – and apply what we learn throughout the city. Disparities in cycling by sex, race/ethnicity, age, and neighborhood poverty also need to be addressed through equitably focused safety improvements, since safety in numbers works best if we increase safety for everyone – starting where it is most needed.

As New York City continues to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic, many New Yorkers may turn to biking as a good way to get around while still keeping a safe distance from others. Our data show us that there is a clear connection between road infrastructure and street safety. That means that one way to keep New Yorkers safe during this public health emergency – and beyond – is to continue building safer streets.

Electronic Waste and Recycling