Kristin Richardson Jordan

HNBA will host Kristin Richardson Jordan this THURSDAY at 7:00 PM to talk about her historic upset of the Harlem machine, her plans for City Council District 9, the upcoming November election, and what she means by Radical Love for Harlem.

To join in, reach out to Shawn, Hallia, Cecile, Saiyda, or Kat for the link, or email: [email protected]

Health Insurance

How Calculated: Estimated number of adults who reported having any kind of health insurance coverage, including private health insurance, prepaid plans such as H-M-Os or government plans such as Medicare or Medicaid; expressed as percent.

Source: New York City Community Health Survey (CHS)

Falls Requiring Emergency Room Visits by Seniors

About falls among older adults in New York City

Each year, one in three older adults (65 years and older) falls. Among New York City’s older adults, there are approximately 30,500 emergency department (ED) visits, 16,600 hospitalizations, and 300 deaths each year. Falls are not a normal part of aging, and research shows that many falls can be prevented.

Falls and the environment

Although falls can occur anywhere, falls among older adults frequently happen at home. More than one-half of fall-related hospitalizations among older adults were due to falls in the home. There are many risk factors for falls among older adults including previous falls, gait or balance problems, and use of multiple medications that interact with one another or cause side effects. Physical features of the environment can also put seniors at risk. Common fall risks hazards in homes include slippery surfaces, inadequate lighting, and tripping hazards, such as clutter, loose rugs, or uneven flooring.

About the data and indicators

Falls indicators presented on this site are derived from administrative emergency department (ED) and hospitalization billing records from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS). Fall-related ED visits and hospitalizations are identified using diagnostic codes from the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, Clinical Modification, as defined by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s external cause-of-injury matrix and using diagnostic information from any diagnosis field. Place of injury codes for these ED visits and hospitalizations allow for identification of falls that have occurred in the home. Data are based on address of the patient, not the address where the fall occurred.  Only falls resulting in outcomes severe enough to require treatment in the hospital ED or an inpatient stay are included; falls resulting in no health outcomes or outcomes treated outside of a NYC hospital are not captured. ED visit counts include treated and released visits, and hospitalization counts include only live discharges. ED visits and hospitalizations include NYC residents aged 65 years and older discharged from a NYC hospital.

Prevention

To help prevent falls, older adults should:

  • Stay physically active to strengthen muscles and improve balance
  • Remove slip and trip hazards in the home, such as throw rugs, electrical cords or other clutter
  • Improve lighting in and around the home
  • Ask building owner, landlord, or super to make all necessary home repairs, and install grab bars in the shower and near the toilet
  • Ask doctor, nurse, and/or pharmacist to review all medicines
  • Talk with doctors about previous falls and prevention strategies

Kristin Jordan

We’ve all seen her posters for the election. Now a new variation has come out where you can schedule a listening time with the Democratic candidate for City Council 9, Kristin Jordan:

Migdol Foundation

Walking on Adam Clayton Powell Blvd the other day I spotted three brass plaques put onto a corner building, facing a side street.

The plaques commemorated various individuals and were sponsored by the Migdol Foundation, which I’d never heard of.

According to their website:

The Migdol Organization, lead by principals Jerry and Aaron Migdol, is a Harlem based company that provides specialized services in housing, development, social work and law. Through its subsidiaries, the Migdol Organization develops, manages, brokers and owns various types of real estate throughout New York City.

Migdol & Migdol LLP provides legal services, specializing in pro-bono legal services for shelter residents and community based organizations. The Migdol Family Foundation and the Daniel Migdol Memorial Fund are dedicated to providing educational and housing resources to residents and community based organizations throughout Harlem.

They are located at: 223 West 138th Street, Ground Floor, New York, NY 10030 | 212.283.4423

For more information, see:

http://migdolorganization.com/contact

Indeed…

From the 5th Avenue wall of the Russworm School (135th and 5th Avenue).

City Council 9 Forum Tomorrow at 6:00 PM

Join MMPCIA in person on West 120th Street between Mount Morris Park West and Malcolm X BLVD (bring a folding chair), or on Zoom.

In-Person, Open Mic, Candidates Forums

NYC CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT 9 CANDIDATES DEBATE

When:    Saturday, June 12, 2021

Time:      2:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Where:   NYC Madison Square Boys & Girls Club 

                 (155 St. & Bradhurst Ave.)

                 250 Bradhurst Avenue

                 NY, NY 10039

Trains:     D to 155 St. Station stop 

Bus:         M10, M3 to 155 St. stop

What Does My City Council Member Do?

Council members are responsible for proposing and voting on bills relating to all aspects of civic life, for example: policinghousingstreet safety and environmental issues like the plastic bag ban.

Bills passed by the Council go to the mayor for to be signed into law. The Council can override a veto from the mayor with a vote of at least two-thirds of the members.

The Council also negotiates with the mayor to pass the city budget every year. Each Council member has his or her own discretionary budget to fund local projects and groups. The Council holds oversight hearings through its many committees. And, critically, the body votes to approve or reject development projects that need public approval.

You can think of the Council as like Congress for the City of New York, as this guide from the Council puts it. The city’s Campaign Finance Board created the below video outlining some of the duties and responsibilities of the City Council:

Sumptuous Gifts from a Black Women-Owned Harlem Business

If you want a gift from Harlem to take to a friend’s (now that you’re both fully vaccinated), the Harlem Chocolate Factory on ACP at 139, is a great place to consider.

City Council District 9 Candidates’ Forum, Tonight at 7:00 PM

What does a City Council Member do, anyway?

And yes, some of the candidates seem to be fuzzy on this as well…

Earlier in March, The City had a great breakdown of what City Council members do, and why you should care about their election. Here is part of The City’s email on the issue:


City Council is kind of like Congress, but for the city. It may seem like a small office, but since New York has 8.4 million people living here, a local office like the City Council has more influence than you may think.

Klein pointed out that some leaders — Mayor Bill de Blasio and Public Advocate Jumaane Williams, to name two — have used the City Council as a stepping stone to higher office.

“City Council is an entry point into politics — and a way to build a bench for more diverse representation in higher offices years down the line,” she said. “One reason many people are disappointed in the mayoral field is because 15 years ago, the city wasn’t building an exciting and diverse bench of new political talent.”

City Council members represent a district that usually includes two to four neighborhoods, and they have four main responsibilities.


They pass laws

Just like Congress or the state Legislature, the City Council proposes and votes on legislation that makes the rules for all sorts of things ranging from public health, education, housing and transportation. You can see all the different City Council committees here.

After a bill is proposed, the Council holds a public hearing to get feedback from the community and potentially make changes. Then, members vote on the bill.

Bills passed by a majority of the Council go to the mayor to be signed into law. The Council can override a veto from the mayor with a vote of at least two-thirds of the members.

Example: The Council has passed laws authorizing things such as police reforms (just last month members proposed another set of reform bills), bike lane protections, the plastic bag banprotecting tenants from harassment and the tax lien sale.


They *help* decide the budget

The Council negotiates with the mayor to pass the city budget every year. That means members help decide how your taxes and other revenue will be spent to fund different city agencies and programs — ranging from the public schools to policing to a bunch of social services. The most recent budget was more than $88 billion.

Your Council member can advocate for certain programs or projects to be funded in your neighborhood. And each Council member has their own discretionary budget to fund local projects and groups

Example: The Council has a huge say in how the city funds its police force, and it cut funding for affordable housing programs in the last budget.


They keep an eye on city agencies

The Council makes sure agencies like the Department of Education, the Department of Housing and Preservation, NYCHA and the NYPD are doing their jobs well.

Example: The Council can monitor what the DOE is doing about school segregation and provide a check on how NYCHA manages and maintains its buildings.

Here’s a list of all the city agencies.


They have a say in how the city uses public land 

And Council members vote to approve or reject development projects that need public approval.

How land is used can affect if housing is affordable, what kind of greenspace is available and how much pollution is likely to affect a neighborhood, among other things.

Klein said: “City Council candidates are extremely accessible in a way that candidates for higher offices aren’t. If you want to get involved in local government, meet with your council candidates, get to know them and ask them questions.”

That means where to build, what to preserve and what to close (like Rikers Island). The Council has a major say in real estate deals for city-owned land and votes on all zoning changes or rezoning.

Example: The Council approved the Flushing rezoning plan.


They can advocate for you

Lastly, Council members can advocate on behalf of their constituents to advance certain causes, like joining the Hunts Point Produce Market workers strike.

Most candidates are hosting campaign events on Zoom or offering ways to be in touch directly with constituents.

https://www.thecity.nyc/2021/3/4/22314486/bill-perkins-harlem-nyc-council-race-health-concerns

Here is a great Explainer Video, Admittedly with a Brooklyn Bias, but hey, BRIC created it…

Checks Stolen From Harlem Mail Boxes

The New York Times reported (in 1910) that theft, forgery, and misrepresentation was uncovered in Harlem

To read the full torrid tale, click on the Download button, above.

Former Sydenham Hospital (now Mannie Wilson Towers) to be renovated

YIMBY NY is reporting that:

Affordable housing development Mannie Wilson Towers in Manhattan’s Harlem neighborhood just received $18.2 million for capital improvements and system upgrades from Merchants Capital New York, a mortgage banking company. Located at 565 Manhattan Avenue, the structure originally debuted in 1892 as Sydenham Hospital, which closed in 1980. Owned by West Harlem Group Assistance, Inc., Mannie Wilson Towers currently provides restricted-income housing to senior residents.

There are 102 one- and two-bedroom units of restricted-income housing for seniors 62 years of age and older that earn 50 percent or less of the area median income in Harlem. Residents have access to supportive services including cleaning, cooking, transportation, and more.

Sydenham began as a private hospital in a Harlem brownstone in 1892, serving mostly African American patients. In 1944 the staff doctors were all white despite serving a mostly African American community. Soon after, it was the first hospital to have a full desegregated interracial policy with six African American Trustees and twenty African Americans on staff. It was New York City’s first full-service hospital to hire African-American doctors and later became known for hiring African American doctors and nurses when other nearby hospitals would not.

Because of its relatively small size, Sydenham continually faced more financial problems than most private hospitals, and on March 3, 1949, control of it was taken by New York City and it became part of the municipal hospital system. However, in a new practice for the municipal hospital system, the city continued to allow Sydenham’s private physicians to hospitalize their patients there. In 1971 Florence Gaynor became the first African American woman to head a major teaching hospital, taking over as Executive Director of Sydenham Hospital during a financial crisis. She also developed a Family Care Center that included a sickle cell anemia clinic.

Sydenham Hospital received many of the residents of Harlem who were injured in the 1943 Harlem Riot – many of them beaten (or shot) by police officers brought in to stop the disturbance.

Soon after Mayor Ed Koch took office in 1977, during severe economic troubles for New York City, he announced an additional 10% reduction in funding for municipal hospitals, and Metropolitan Hospital (in East Harlem), and Sydenham were slated for closure. There was community support of both hospitals. In January 1979, the Committee for Interns and Residents staged a one-day walkout of doctors at municipal hospitals to protest the cuts, and were often supported on picket lines by hospital workers from District Council 37 of AFSCME. A “Coalition to Save Sydenham” supported legal efforts to stop the closing, organized public rallies and lobbying of elected officials, and helped publicize research to demonstrate the need for the hospital. (In 1977 the federal government designated Harlem a “medically underserved area, with the Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare Joseph Califano calling it a “health disaster area.”) While a diminished Metropolitan Hospital was saved as an “Outpatient Demonstration:” project, the city insisted that Sydenham had to be closed. In the spring of 1980, as Sydenham was about to be shut down, angry demonstrators stormed the hospital, and initiated an occupation that lasted 10 days under a so-called “People’s Administration.”

Despite the added publicity, this brought, in 1980 Sydenham’s doors were closed for good and eventually, the Mannie Wilson Towers were built within the hospital’s shell.

Harlem Women Strong: City Council 9 Candidates

Today, at 10:00 AM!

Meet Your Mayor

As you likely know, the mayoral race in NYC is almost overwhelmin. To help voters navigate options, THE CITY has created Meet Your Mayor, which shows you how the candidates’ stands fit with how you are seeing the race.

Here’s what to do: You answer a few short multiple-choice questions on some of the most pressing matters facing the city — from COVID recovery to public school admissions to NYPD discipline and much more.

The major candidates have already answered the same questions.

Voila: Meet Your Mayor will reveal your best match or matches among the candidates

To get started, click below on any of the 3 topics. Answer questions with how you feel about these issues. Then the candidates that agree most with your answers will be displayed:

Now Meet Your City Council 9 Candidates!

Fire on Park Avenue

You may have heard about the fire last week on Park Avenue between 128/129. Given the presence of the Metro North tracks, the trucks had to extend ladders and evacuation buckets in an odd configuration with one extended a number of storefronts, but essentially parallel to the ground:

The Visitation

HERE PRESENTS WORLD PREMIERE OF THE VISITATION FROM STEPHANIE FLEISCHMANN, CHRISTINA CAMPANELLA, AND MALLORY CATLETT

The Visitation, a sound walk, a haunting site-specific experience created by Stephanie Fleischmann, Christina Campanella, and Mallory Catlett. Inspired by the appearance of a one-antlered deer in Harlem in 2016, The Visitation takes the listener on an urban odyssey in search of the collective memory of the deer’s sojourn in Jackie Robinson Park via geo-located avant-pop songs that conjure a series of encounters with the buck. Launching on April 23, The Visitation is a meditation on the presence of the mythic in the everyday and the uneasy relationship between the built environment and the natural world.

Conceived and developed with director Catlett and featuring original music and sound design by
Campanella and text by Fleischmann, the soundscape of The Visitation is threaded through with the
ethereal sounds of the deer, voiced by Obie-winning legend Black-Eyed Susan, a founding member of
Charles Ludlam’s Ridiculous Theatrical Company. Listeners simultaneously traverse interior landscapes and exterior terrain ranging from far-reaching urban vistas to a dense canopy of trees, from the former wilderness of the park to the blacktop of basketball courts and playgrounds.
Geo-located songs conjure moments experienced by a handful of characters—including a park gardener,a weeping pharmacist, a neighborhood teenager, and more—whose lives were changed by their encounter with the deer.

Along the way, participants will also encounter Mesingw, a Lenape spirit associated with the deer, who
could, it was believed, reinstate balance to a disease-inflicted earth. Listeners may ask themselves,
“Where is Mesingw now? How do we navigate his absence, and that of Artemis, Greek goddess of
nature, from our contemporary lives? What are the repercussions of the ways we continue to colonize
the land on which we live?”

The team for The Visitation also includes Lenape historical consultant Oleana Whispering Dove.
Participants must download the Gesso app onto their mobile device to experience The Visitation, which begins a few blocks from Jackie Robinson Park, at West 148th Street and St Nicholas Avenue. The geography of the park includes stairs and some uneven terrain. A map with alternate start and end points is available for individuals with limited mobility. Participants should bring their own headphones. The Visitation can also be experienced remotely via the Gesso app as a 60-minute soundscape.

The Visitation launches on April 23, 202, and is free to download, however, donations at www.here.org
are encouraged.

On Saturday, May 1, the creators from The Visitation and the founders of Gesso will host an in-person
gathering in Jackie Robinson Park to discuss the inspiration, artistry, and technology behind the sound walk.

City Council District 9 Forum

Here is the zoom registration link: http://bit.ly/HWS_Forum

Harlem Dream Book

During the Harlem Renaissance and beyond, dream books were sold at newspaper kiosks to help people interpret things seen in dreams, and to convert those memories into a 3 digit number that could be used to play in the numbers.

Recently a 1949 “Harlem Pete” dream book came on the market. Given that they were cheaply printed on the lowest quality paper, it’s remarkable that this one survived in such good shape.

To see what it sold for: https://www.ebay.com/itm/124574310554?ul_noapp=true&autorefresh=true

Marvin Holland Fined

Patch’s Nick Garber reports that Marvin Holland is being fined by nearly $18,000. Holland was a City Council District 9 candidate during the last election.

A past candidate for City Council in Harlem was hit with nearly $18,000 in penalties this week for eight separate campaign finance violations, the city’s Campaign Finance Board announced Tuesday.

Marvin Holland, a union organizer who ran twice in 2017 for Central Harlem’s District 9 seat, faces $17,909 in penalties amid allegations that his campaign failed to report its spending and did not respond to audits from the board, in violation of city rules.

https://patch.com/new-york/harlem/harlem-council-candidate-fined-17k-campaign-violations

CB11 Full Board Meeting and More

Full Board MeetingTuesday • March 23rd • 6:30pm
In order to attend this meeting, please register in advance for this webinar. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.
View the meeting agenda here.
If you wish to speak during the public session, please fill out this form.
View our full meeting schedule here

City Council District 9 – Show Me The Money

There is a new map out showing how much political candidates have been able to fundraise.

The race that has generated the largest amount of donations is, unsurprisingly, the mayoral race and that race is headed by Ray McGuire, the Wall Street former finance executive who has received over $85,000 from Harlem.

Eric Adams has pulled in a distant second of $29,000.

Turning to the City Council District 9 Race, you can see in the map below, money has come from all over the city to fuel the 15 candidates.

Zooming in closer, Kristen R. Jordan is far and away the leader with more than $55,000 raise – her base being the lower edge of the district.

Mario Rosser is close behind with almost $48,000 raised. His (financial) support is weaker in the north and south of the district but with strong support in the central core.

And in third place, Keith Taylor – who came to February’s HNBA meeting to introduce himself and his campaign – has raised over $20,000. His support is mostly in the west, with weaker support in the east and north of the district.

And lastly, the dominant force in the Manhattan Borough President’s race in our community, is Mark Levine, by far. Mark has raised well over $400,000 total, and a significant amount has come from the Harlem community, whereas other candidates have had very, very limited fundraising success in Harlem and East Harlem.

To view the map and see who’s been fundraising and who’s viewing this election cycle as a vanity project, go to: https://www.nyccfb.info/follow-the-money/cunymap-2021/