Join Your Community Board

The Manhattan Community Board Application Deadline is March 1.

Each board has up to 50 members, all volunteers. Board members serve via staggered two-year terms, which means half must be reappointed or replaced every year.

All of those people are appointed by their own borough president. City Council members can recommend new applicants, but the final call rests with the BP.

You can apply to join Manhattan’s boards and get chosen without special access or expertise, you just need to care about the issues that are relevant and important to the community. There are no prerequisites to join a board, except that you must live or work in the district where you’d like to serve. Any city resident 16 or older can join. Community Boards are particularly lacking New Yorkers without cars on boards.

Here is what The City recommends:

  • Attend a board meeting, or several, before you apply. It’ll give you a sense of how — and how well — your local board is run, and votes are cast. Many of the board applications ask whether you’ve attended meetings, so be prepared. Bonus points if you attend a committee hearing!
  • A board application is a bit like applying for a job. You may be asked for a resume or references. Bear in mind, applications are subject to the Freedom of Information Law, meaning they could be made public down the line.
  • Usually, new members “have an issue that’s hard in their minds that they want to deal with,” said Winfield — parks funding, or homelessness. But whatever it is, he tells new members: “Don’t lose it. Once you get on the board, keep that issue and join the right committee.”
  • Don’t count yourself out. Boards don’t necessarily need experts, people of a certain professional class, or veteran movers and shakers. Washington said a community gardener with 20 hours a month to dedicate to the housing committee is worth way more than “the best accountant in the world” with only “two minutes a month.”
  • That said, if you’re accepted, get ready to dedicate a good chunk of time to it, Washington said. He estimates it may take up between 10 to 15 hours every month between meetings and brushing up on the issues on the agenda. For super-members like Winfield, it’s even more. “It’s a lot of reading and it’s a lot of investigating,” Winfield said.
  • Get ready for some… spirited debates! Much of board life is a bit mundane, or procedural, but when there’s a divisive issue on the agenda, it can get heated. Keep your cool — and bring snacks and water for occasional long meetings.

Many people looking to work in government or run for office in New York get their experience at a community board first. The proof is in the pudding: current Council Speaker Adrienne Adams, Lieutenant Governor Brian Benjamin, and former Speaker Corey Johnson all served as chairs of boards, in southeast Queens, Harlem and Chelsea, respectively.

“You learn a lot about the city government structure,” said Winfield. “It’s a learning place.”

https://www.cb11m.org/

The Manhattan Community Board Application Deadline is March 1.

CB11 Meeting Tonight

Here is your chance to speak to our elected officials (and/or their representatives) about issues that concern you and your neighbors. You can raise your hand and comment, write questions/thoughts in the chat, and present any community announcements you might have.

Full Board

Tuesday • September 28th • 6:30pm
In order to attend this meeting, please register in advance for this webinar.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.
If you wish to speak during the public session at our September Full Board Meeting, please indicate your interest in speaking and fill out the form here.

View the agenda on our meeting calendar here.

Harlem Pete Dream Book

Harlemites who played the numbers often consulted dream books that suggested number combinations to play for luck. This rare, ephemeral book is clearly made on cheap, acidic paper, but it survives from 1948:

You can see the item on Ebay, here.

Correction: CB11 Full Board Meeting on Tuesday, September 28th

Community Board 11’s Full Board Meeting is scheduled for a week from today (on September 28th) at 6:30 PM.

For details see:

https://www.cb11m.org/pmcalendar/

To sign up to add your voice:

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_owOGKFs9RyOxC7-An2Sz3Q

Tunnel Vision

Tunnel Vision by Logan Hicks – the largest stenciled mural in the world. 

In the middle of 2020, during the height of the pandemic in New York City, Logan Hicks was commissioned to creatively re-imagine a massive breezeway at the East River Plaza in Harlem. Nearly a year later, Hicks completes his largest work to date – a 19,000 sq. ft installation entitled “Tunnel Vision”. This work consists of a continuous stenciled mural that wraps the inside the towering breezeway, paired with a custom designed sound installation. The mural is set to be certified by Guinness World Records on July 29th, 2021.

Behold layers of stenciled aerosol transforming gray concrete into lush greenery, climbing up each of the thirty-foot walls and pillars, meeting at the ceiling painted in a vibrant, sky-blue gradient. Looking closely, tucked in the green thicket covering the walls are dozens of stenciled birds that live within New York State, while the four-hour looping soundtrack brings them to life – featuring the calls of every bird indigenous to New York.

This experiential piece was inspired by Christian Cooper, the Central Park birdwatcher who was thrust into the spotlight in May of 2020. Cooper shed light on a part of New York that Hicks was unaware of – the birdwatching community. Until that story unfolded across media outlets everywhere, the artist never knew of the Ramble – the birdwatching section of Central Park. 

During the pandemic, Hicks visited the area many times and was taken by the symphony of bird chirps and songs that echoed through the treetops. The idyllic utopia of wildlife sits right in the middle of this bustling city.

Recognizing that there is a segment of the population that would not go to Central Park with a pair of binoculars to watch birds, Tunnel Vision is Hicks’ attempt to recreate the feeling of the Central Park Ramble in the language that he understands best – murals. 

To grasp the scale of such an endeavor, it’s noteworthy that the artist’s estimate to complete the mural would be one, maybe two months on-site. Braving the unpredictable weather of every season, Hicks has now used over 100 gallons of paint, 500 cans of spray paint, hundreds of stencils, dozens of rolls of Gorilla Tape, and an uncounted number of hours painting – defying expectations – and tedious limitations of the stencil medium – to complete Tunnel Vision.

Silent Procession 2021

Scenes from the 2021 Silent Procession:

https://bronx.news12.com/silent-procession-held-to-magnify-human-rights-issues-in-puerto-rico

Eric Adams and Brian Benjamin were in attendance.

Community Board 11 – Full Board Meeting

Tuesday (September 28) at 6:30 PM

Here is your chance to speak to our elected officials (and/or their representatives) about issues that concern you and your neighbors. You can raise your hand and comment, write questions/thoughts in the chat, and present any community announcements you might have.

Go to the CB11 calendar link below:

https://www.cb11m.org/pmcalendar/

And register for the September 28th meeting.

As Seen on the Metro North Platform

CB11 Wants to Hear From You

Manhattan CB11 is seeking your input to help determine East Harlem’s greatest needs and budget priorities for the upcoming fiscal year. You can participate in the annual budget process by filling out the Public Input Survey today! We will be accepting responses through August 22, 2021. 
Access the survey here: https://forms.gle/qHEr3WvVrxcH2kNa6

For more information, please contact the community board office at
(212)831-8929 or [email protected].

Compost Collection is Coming (in the Fall)

Curbside composting will return to NYC beginning fall 2021!

We will collect food scraps, food-soiled paper, and yard waste and turn it into compost or renewable energy. 

Residents must sign up for this voluntary service through a simple online form or by calling 311. 

You will be able to sign up the first week of August, and service will start in the fall on a rolling basis. Learn more at nyc.gov/curbsidecomposting

To be notified when the curbside composting sign-up form is available, register at nyc.gov/curbsidecomposting.  
 Share this with your friends and neighbors!FacebookTwitterInstagram
nyc.gov/sanitation

Community Board 11 Wants To Hear From You

Click This Link to register:

A Rare Cornerstone

A rare Harlem cornerstone that not only has the year built, but also the name of the architect.

Found on East 128th Street, at Madison, on the former ARC building.

East Harlem Residents – Your Opinion Wanted One Week From Today

CB11 Budget Town Hall

Wednesday, August 11, 2021 6:00p.m. – 8:00p.m.
Register at https://bit.ly/CB11Budget

Hear from your City & State representatives about the budget process and share your ideas for East Harlem’s future!

CB11 is seeking input from our constituents about East Harlem’s greatest needs. Following an informational presentation about the City and State budget from your representatives, we’re passing the mic to you to hear your thoughts, concerns, and ideas about your neighborhood. Your feedback will inform our budget requests for the following fiscal year.

Confirmed attendees:

Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer

Council Member Diana Ayala

Council Member Ben Kallos

State Senator Jose Serrano

Assembly Member Robert J. Rodriguez

Assembly Member Inez Dickens

Kudos to Metropolitan Hospital

The Metropolitan Hospital – as a part of NYC Health + Hospitals – has announced it will participate in a “Medical Eracism” initiative to eliminate biased, race-based assessments used for decades in hospitals and clinics across the country to influence medical decisions that have been found to negatively impact the quality of care patients of color receive. The public health care system has already eliminated two common diagnostic tests – for kidney disease and vaginal birth after a cesarean delivery (VBAC) – that have embedded race-based calculations for severity of illness and risk, and can lead to implicit biases and errors in diagnosis and treatment. This initiative builds on the health system’s commitment to eliminate implicit bias in health care and provide equitable, quality care to more than one million New Yorkers who choose NYC Health + Hospitals as their medical home. For more information visit here.

Metropolitan has also been named “America’s most racially inclusive hospital” in the 2021 Lown Hospitals Index, the first ranking to examine the racial inclusivity of over 3,200 U.S. hospitals. For more information on the rankings, visit here.

Seen on FDB

CB11 Wants to Hear From You

Manhattan CB11 is seeking your input to help determine East Harlem’s greatest needs and budget priorities for the upcoming fiscal year. You can participate in the annual budget process by filling out the Public Input Survey today! We will be accepting responses through August 22, 2021. 
Access the survey here: https://forms.gle/qHEr3WvVrxcH2kNa6

For more information, please contact the community board office at
(212)831-8929 or [email protected].

Community Districts

East Harlem has many commonalities with the South Bronx in terms of population, history, infrastructure, and governmental relations.

A map of the density of opioid treatment programs (as licensed by OASAS) shows the clear linkage.

Note how CB11 (East Harlem) has the largest opioid capacity in New York City. OASAS has packed programs in East Harlem repeatedly and forced East Harlem to serve addicted New Yorkers who reside in the gray areas on the map.

To view an interactive version of the map (hover over a community district to learn the opioid capacity and district number), see below:

CB11 Votes for a 12 Month Drug Program Moratorium

Nick Garber reports in Patch on the vote in Community Board 11 to try a 12 month moratorium on the siting of new drug programs in the districts.

https://patch.com/new-york/harlem/drug-clinics-face-scrutiny-harlem-residents-push-back

The moratorium also asks for more data from the Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) to explain why East Harlem has been packed with addiction programs that other wealthier communities have rejected. Similarly, the moratorium notes that 80% of the people served by these programs in East Harlem don’t live here, but are drug treatment commuters who travel here for their programs.

The Church of All Saints

The landmarked Church of All Saints in East Harlem may have found a buyer. The New York Post reported recently that this church (which has been up for sale for a few years now, and includes the All Saints School complex to the north of the church which was closed in 2011) is negotiating with a potential buyer.

Historic All Saints Church — called the “St. Patrick’s of Harlem” — is about to be sold, The Post has learned.

The Catholic Archdiocese of New York shuttered the church in 2015 and the landmark building, along with its adjacent school and parish house, which occupy an entire block, have stood empty since.

A spokesman for the Archdiocese would not provide any details on the pending sale.

“There is no final agreement in place; things are in process,” said Joseph Zwilling, a spokesman for the Archdiocese.

https://nypost.com/2021/01/23/historic-all-saints-church-in-nyc-to-be-sold/

There certainly has been a flurry of (scaffolding) activity at the site in the last month or so. You can see a huge vertical scaffold section that has allowed workers to examine and repair the topmost facade cross.

While it’s unclear if the church will be sold or not (many a deal has fallen through before finalized), and once sold, we have no idea if the buyer will warehouse the complex or develop it, still, there is local hope that this building will see new life in some form or another.

The building has been deconsecrated and stripped of religious items in 2017, and as with 98% of landmarking, the interior is not landmarked – a new owner could do whatever s/he wants with the inside.

Note the amazing organ and decoration back when the church was in use.

This church was built for the large Irish Catholic population in this part of Harlem and East Harlem at the turn of the 20th century. More recently, it served a primarily African-American and Nigerian parish base and was run by Franciscans.

Timeline of Our Annus Horribilis – 2020

The Museum of the City of New York has a fantastic timeline out that chart our collective Annus Horribilis – 2020.

Scroll down the page to see what happened and when. Here is an explainer video:

And here is the timeline itself:

https://mcny.nyc/nyresponds/timeline/

MTA Public Hearing re: NYS Eminent Domain Procedure Law

Tue, March 30, 6pm – 7pm

DescriptionThe Metropolitan Transportation Authority (“MTA”), on behalf of itself and its subsidiaries, will hold a Virtual public hearing under Executive Order 202.94 and pursuant to Article 2 of the New York State Eminent Domain Procedure Law (“EDPL”) on the proposed acquisition of permanent & temporary property interests in properties in the Borough of Manhattan for Phase 2, Contract 2 of the Second Avenue Subway Project (“Project”). 

The hearing will review the public uses, benefits, purposes, and location of the Project, the impact the Project may have on the environment and residents of the area, and will give the public an opportunity to comment on the Project and the proposed Property acquisition. Description of the Project  The Second Avenue Subway, when complete, will provide a subway line with 16 new stations extending from 125th St. & Lexington Ave. to Hanover Square, will link MTA New York City Transit facilities with Metro-North Railroad at 125th St. & provide connections to buses. Acquisition of public & private real estate interests along the project route will be necessary for the construction and operation of the Project.

Phase 1 of the Project has already been completed. Currently, the line runs from E. 96th St. to E. 63rd St. along Second Av., where it joins the existing Broadway Line. Phase 2 of the Project will extend the line north to E. 125th St. turning west along E. 125th St. towards Lexington Ave.

Contract 2 consists of construction of the launch box for the Tunnel Boring Machine(s), bored tunnel north from 120th St. at Second Ave. and tunnel & cavern mining for the 125th St. Station and future entrance and ancillary facilities.

This public hearing includes property interests needed for Contract 2 only. Date, Time and Place of the Virtual Hearing Tuesday, March 30, 2021 Hearing begins at 6:00 p.m.  Registration to speak can be made in advance by visiting new.mta.info/2021EDPL-SASP2-hearing, which will remain open through the hearing date.  Registration will close at 6:30 p.m. Please note this Public Hearing is being conducted in a Virtual format under Executive Order 202.94.

The public may join the hearing by visiting https://mta.zoom.us/j/82605599788 or by calling 877-853-5247 (Meeting ID 82605599788).  A link will also be provided on the MTA website.

A Tribute to Women’s History Tickets, Sat, Mar 27, 2021 at 7:00 PM |

www.harlemoperatheater.org

REGISTRATION – Eventbrite

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-tribute-to-womens-history-tickets-146654097353&sa=U&ved=2ahUKEwix5paZ_8HvAhWkct8KHUHPBdAQFjAAegQIAhAB&usg=AOvVaw1tfToykmITTN8Rl5Nn4x_3

EVENT LINK – SATURDAY, MARCH 27th – 7PM
Click link to the YouTube livestream for March 27th at 7pm

https://youtu.be/Yl8McJthrOQ

DONATIONS WELCOME AND APPRECIATED