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Make sure to head to the polls today to vote for Governor and State Assembly (among others).

Church > Synagogue > Shake Shack

On the north-west corner of 5th and 125th Street, the lot occupied by Shake Shack and the check cashing business was, at one point the Holy Trinity Episcopal Church of Harlem.

In the photo (above – Robert Bracklow, photographer) from 1905, you can see the church building, and (further west and next door) the tall Flemish style (white) YMCA on 125th Street.

Looking carefully at the church, however, you may notice an absence. There are no crosses on the pinnacles, nor at the top of the pediment.

The reason? At this point, in 1905, the building had been purchased by one of Harem’s Jewish congregations – Temple Israel – and now was their home of worship.

Eventually this synagogue was demolished and now, Shake Shack occupies this corner of 125/5th.

GothamToGo

Gotham To Go has a great article on East Harlem’s African Burial Ground. Make sure to check it out:

2020 Debate Tonight!

A number of HNBA members had a great time in June of 2019 when we joined the¬†first¬†night of the Presidential Primary Debates in Harlem, NYC. Tonight it’s the (first) Election 2020 debate!

Instagram: @newyorkforbiden2020 / Facebook: @newyorkforbiden / Twitter: @newyorkforbiden
https://www.mobilize.us/joebiden/event/331934/

Our democracy, humanity, and sanity are on the ballot this November.

#NewYorkStrong #ItsUpToUs

Cemeteries of New York

Most of us are likely aware of the great cemeteries in New York like Woodlawn (straight up the 4 train, and open to the public – dogs permitted after signing a waiver) and Green Wood (Brooklyn), as well as the cemetery ‘belt’ in Queens. You may also be aware of the lost cemeteries like the African Burial Ground (behind City Hall) and our own East Harlem African Burial Ground that is now covered by the abandoned MTA bus depot at 126th and 1st Avenue.

Cemeteries of NYC, however, has not only mapped the ones we’ve all heard of, but countless others that were (or are) burial grounds in the 5 Boroughs:

Zooming into Harlem, I was surprised to see some cemeteries (long gone) that once existed. In particular, note how much of Wards and Randall’s Island were used as potters fields:

In this, zoomed in view, note how there was a cemetery, on both sides of Lexington, between 125/126:

On the map you can click on each of the features to learn more about how many people were/are buried there, and when/if they were transferred to another location at some point:

https://www.cemeteriesofnyc.com/map