Early Voting Sites Are Open!

Vote in person, or simply drop off your absentee ballot.

Early Voting

New Yorkers can vote early for the November 3, 2020 general election.

Early voting starts on October 24, and runs until November 1, 2020.

Early Voting Information

 Saturday, October 24, 2020 10 AM to 4 PM
 Sunday, October 25, 2020 10 AM to 4 PM
 Monday, October 26, 2020 7 AM to 3 PM
 Tuesday, October 27, 2020 12 PM to 8 PM 
 Wednesday, October 28, 2020 12 PM to 8 PM
 Thursday, October 29, 2020 10 AM to 6 PM 
 Friday, October 30, 2020 7 AM to 3 PM 
 Saturday, October 31, 2020 10 AM to 4 PM
 Sunday, November 1, 2020 10 AM to 4 PM

On November 3, 2020, General Election Day, poll sites are open 6 AM to 9 PM.

FIND YOUR POLLING PLACE


A Feminist Walk Through Harlem: Celebrating Remarkable Women
 

ValSaveHarlemNow (5).jpg

How do we honor Black and Latina women? How do we preserve their legacy? 2020 marks the Centennial of Women’s Suffrage, but Black women’s contributions to the movement largely go uncelebrated, and most Black women in America could not vote until 1965. As the city and the nation confront issues of representation and equity in public commemoration, and to build on FRIENDS’ discussion of the Women’s Right Pioneers Monument in Central Park, please join FRIENDS of the Upper East Side and Save Harlem Now! for a virtual walk through Harlem. The tour will focus on sites publicly celebrating pioneering Black and Latina women, and issues surrounding the preservation of such sites. Tour guide Leigh Hallingby, of Harlem Walks, will explore the neighborhood murals, mosaics, plaques, and other forms of public commemoration honoring such pioneers as Vivian Robinson, Ella Fitzgerald, Madam C.J. Walker, Billie Holiday, Mother Clara Hale, Ruby Dee, Lois Alexander, Mary McLeod Bethune, Julia de Burgos, A’Lelia Walker, Nicholasa Mohr, and Zora Neale Hurston. 

Monday, October 26th

6:00 p.m.

Register HERE!

Open Streets this weekend!

Hi neighbors,

We’ve now got not just one but TWO Open Streets here in East Harlem! This weekend’s schedule:

PLEASANT AVENUE AT 118TH:

Saturday, October 17:

  • COVID testing (rapid & antibody), plus flu shots (10 a.m.-5 p.m.)
  • HIV and Hep-C screenings (10 a.m.-4 p.m.)
  • “Pick your own” produce sales at Pleasant Village Community Garden‬ (10 a.m.-2 p.m.)
  • Free smoothies by Get Healthy East Harlem Cafe (Noon-5 p.m.)
  • ‬Zumba with Leo Zumba‬ (2-3 p.m.)

Sunday, October 18:

  • Adventure playground with playground:NYC, powered by Patsy’s Pizza (12-3 p.m.)
  • Obstacle course with Street Lab, plus chalk art with Jess Rolls (12-3 p.m.)
  • Free smoothies by Get Healthy East Harlem Cafe (Noon-5 p.m.)

The street will always be open for scooting and biking, plus our (as Patch put it, “staggeringly long”) community table is open for socially distanced dining from Bistro Casa Azul or any picnic you bring from home.

101ST STREET AT LEXINGTON:

101st Street has tables and chairs for open-air dining from local small businesses including Lexington Pizza Parlour, Chu Ros Thai, Au Jus Oklahoma BBQ, Burritos y Mas, Mojo Mousse Bar, Joy Burger Bar, Pro Thai, El Tepeyac, MY NY Cafe, Lloyd’s Carrot Cake & more. Plus games and sidewalk chalk for adults and kids!

Also, Saturday nights at 7 p.m., we’re screening film shorts curated by the International Puerto Rican Heritage Film Festival. Grab dinner and a drink from one of the nearby eateries, and join us!

Signs Seen Around The Neighborhood

These signs speak for themselves.

And to sum it all up, a great list from Astor Row:

Events at the Harlem Rose Garden

The Harlem Rose Garden (East 129th Street at 5th Avenue) is hosting a number of events in October. Garden members thought it would be a great idea to host a series of laughter filled movie nights and their annual Halloween bash! 

The events are limited to 25 people. All events will be first come first served and you are required to wear a mask unless eating or drinking. 

To stay COVID friendly we are encouraging members to bring their own personal snacks or dinners. 

Here is the schedule of upcoming events:

Friday 10/16 – Crazy Rich Asians

Seating 6:30 PM.  Start 7:00 PM

Saturday 10/17 – Garden Halloween Decoration  (Help decorate for our upcoming Halloween Bash) 12 PM-2 PM.

Thursday – 10/22  – Movie: We will do a pick of the week, more than likely something scary in the spirit of Halloween!Wednesday

Seating 6:30PM Start 7PM

10/28 *Kids Movie Night *Seating 6:30PM Start 7PM 1HR Movie – Addam’s Family 
Saturday10/31

Halloween NIghtmare on 129th Street *Candy handout for trick or treaters * Covid friendly games * Custom contests 

Please let the garden know if you are free to volunteer for Halloween, we will also need candy donations!  

Schools+COVID+Apps…

For everyone, not just families with children, the potential for schools to be vectors for the explosion of winter COVID cases is huge. The DoE has a useful map to help everyone, but parents in particular, learn about COVID impacted schools.

🔴 A red dot indicates a building that has been closed.

🔵 A blue dot indicates one or more classrooms in a building that has been closed.

Unfortunately, as you can see on the map, Harlem and East Harlem have been been severely impacted. Below is a more detailed view of our community:

To keep up and stay informed, use the link below. Note that the map is updated Sunday through Friday (not Saturday):

https://www.schools.nyc.gov/school-year-20-21/return-to-school-2020/health-and-safety/daily-covid-case-map

New York’s New COVID Alert App

The New York Department of Health has launched a new, free app that will tell you if you’ve come in contact with a COVID-positive person. COVID Alert NY is available as of today for iPhone and Android. Using your phone’s Bluetooth technology, it will alert you if you’ve been within six feet of an infected person for more than 10 minutes.

In a press conference call yesterday, Governor Cuomo said he believes the app is the first of its kind in the nation. It cost $700,000 to develop and was paid for through a combination of federal dollars and support from Bloomberg Philanthropies. The Bluetooth technology–which senses proximity to other phones–was developed by Google and Apple in conjunction with MIT. The Linux Foundation and Tech:NYC also collaborated on the app.

The technology works to sense “close contact”–that within six feet and for at least 10 minutes (it ignores people who you just pass by or were farther than six feet from). When your phone senses close contact, it exchanges a secure random code with the other person’s phone, and your phone stores this close contact code in a list. If a person tests positive, the Department of Health contacts them and gives them a password that they can enter into the app that will then alert people moving forward. The DOH will also ask the positive person if he or she is willing to share their app’s list of close contacts to alert those they’ve been in contact with previously. It’s completely voluntary and no names or privacy information will be shared, which is the reason the app was developed with Bluetooth technology instead of GPS.

2020 Debate Tonight!

A number of HNBA members had a great time in June of 2019 when we joined the first night of the Presidential Primary Debates in Harlem, NYC. Tonight it’s the (first) Election 2020 debate!

Instagram: @newyorkforbiden2020 / Facebook: @newyorkforbiden / Twitter: @newyorkforbiden
https://www.mobilize.us/joebiden/event/331934/

Our democracy, humanity, and sanity are on the ballot this November.

#NewYorkStrong #ItsUpToUs

Cemeteries of New York

Most of us are likely aware of the great cemeteries in New York like Woodlawn (straight up the 4 train, and open to the public – dogs permitted after signing a waiver) and Green Wood (Brooklyn), as well as the cemetery ‘belt’ in Queens. You may also be aware of the lost cemeteries like the African Burial Ground (behind City Hall) and our own East Harlem African Burial Ground that is now covered by the abandoned MTA bus depot at 126th and 1st Avenue.

Cemeteries of NYC, however, has not only mapped the ones we’ve all heard of, but countless others that were (or are) burial grounds in the 5 Boroughs:

Zooming into Harlem, I was surprised to see some cemeteries (long gone) that once existed. In particular, note how much of Wards and Randall’s Island were used as potters fields:

In this, zoomed in view, note how there was a cemetery, on both sides of Lexington, between 125/126:

On the map you can click on each of the features to learn more about how many people were/are buried there, and when/if they were transferred to another location at some point:

https://www.cemeteriesofnyc.com/map

Dutch Open Urinals and Planters

A Dutch company is marketing an open air urinal that also functions as a planter while reducing the urine to water and fertizer.

The idea is that men are already peeing in the open – next to planters, in doorways, between cars – and perhaps this would alleviate some of the issues.

The installation of a couple of these units resulted in:

“… a 50% reduction in wild peeing,” said De Vries. “It was a great success.”

You can read more at this CNN article:

https://www.cnn.com/style/article/amsterdam-sustainable-urinal-scli-intl/index.html

Bathrooms Open In Manhattan

Gale Brewer’s team has come up with a map of the public bathrooms still open. Patch.com has the details on where you can find relief.

To see a live version of the map and read more, see Patch.com:

https://patch.com/new-york/harlem/these-34-harlem-public-bathrooms-are-open-despite-pandemic

New FOIL Data from OASAS

In August I submitted a FOIL request to OASAS, the NYS agency that licenses every single addiction program in New York State (and who refuses to meet with HNBA, State Assembly Member Robert Rodriguez, or The Greater Harlem Coalition…) in order to discuss their decades-long practice of locating addiction programs in Black and Latinx majority communities like Harlem and East Harlem that wealthier and whiter neighborhoods reject. This striking example of systemic racism is proven by comparing community need with the number of programs and/or the capacity totals of these programs.

Quite simply, Harlem and East Harlem have an oversaturation of programs which serve people from outside our community and who commute in for treatment, then (frequently) simply hang out on our streets.

The OASAS 2018 FOIL data from (ABOVE – obtained by the Sugar Hill Concerned Neighbors group) indicated that over 19% of all the Opioid Treatment Programs in New York City are located here, in Harlem and East Harlem. The August 2020 FOIL request I recently received (BELOW – although incomplete – I will be resubmitting the request) indicates that Harlemites form 8% of the admissions to New York City’s addiction programs

While I am still working on getting the data for community admissions (not just NYC wide admissions), there is clear consistency between this 2020 data, and the 2017 data: Harlem and East Harlem are home to approximately 7 – 8% of people admitted to addiction programs.

The proof, therefore, for systemic racism is clear. While only home to 7 – 8% of addiction admissions, OASAS and the NYC Department of Health have for decades packed programs in our community to the point where we have 2.5 times the number of programs the addiction rate data would warrant.

Elections and Population Density

With the 2020 elections fast approaching, I wanted to share a fantastic visualization that shows population density. The map is fascinating and allows you to really get a sense of major metropolitan areas and the vast (population) deserts that separate them:

In the illustration above you see us, in New York, and the tail of Long Island tapering out to the east. You can probably make out some of the Ohio cities (2020 battlegrounds) and then Detroit up at the top.

Here is a full view of the US:

And you can look at the high resolution image of it all, here:

https://www.visualcapitalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/density-map-full-usa.html

And to see the incredible urban areas of the Indian subcontinent and east Asia:

Click here: https://www.visualcapitalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/density-map-full-world.html

More on the map, here: https://www.visualcapitalist.com/3d-mapping-the-worlds-largest-population-densities

Harlem African Burial Ground Project Put On Hold

Patch.com reports that the Harlem African Burial Ground Project is a victim of the NYC budget crisis stemming from COVID-19. It’s not over, but it has stalled:

The burial ground site has been subjected to a "long tradition of disrespect," with the building atop it being used as a beer garden, army barracks, a movie studio and, most recently, an MTA bus depot.
The burial ground site has been subjected to a “long tradition of disrespect,” with the building atop it being used as a beer garden, army barracks, a movie studio and, most recently, an MTA bus depot. (Google Maps)

HARLEM, NY — A long-planned project to construct a memorial at the site of a historic African burial ground on 126th Street has been put on hold due to the pandemic, a community board leader told members this week.

Angel Mescain, district manager of East Harlem’s Community Board 11, said Wednesday that the city’s Economic Development Corporation has put the project “on pause” like many other development projects across the city, which is facing a $9 billion budget deficit due to the coronavirus.

The project has not been canceled, Mescain told CB11’s Land Use Committee, adding that “they’re just not rolling along the same schedule they had anticipated.”

See: https://patch.com/new-york/harlem/harlem-african-burial-ground-project-put-hold

Harlem Woman Turns 100, Urging Neighbors To Vote, Fill Out Census

From Patch: https://patch.com/new-york/harlem/harlem-woman-turns-100-urging-neighbors-vote-fill-out-census

Katie Nichson celebrated a century in Harlem on Saturday, commanding her well-wishers to “Get up off your butt and get out and vote!”

“I want people to learn that elections come up not just when there’s number 45 in there,” she said. “No, every time there’s an election, go out and vote, because the community is closer to you than the presidency.”

Community has indeed been the driving force of Nichson’s decades in the neighborhood. A longtime member of Mother AME Zion, she has also served in the neighborhood’s Democratic club since its inception, and is a regular guest at neighborhood community meetings — including one in 2017 where she made news for unloading on Mayor Bill de Blasio over the poor conditions of Harlem’s sidewalks.

Nichson said the importance of civic engagement wasn’t lost on her, as someone born the same year that women — at least some women — were guaranteed the right to vote.

“The fact [is] that at one time, women could not vote,” she said. “Then white women could vote and we couldn’t vote.”

NYC’s Marathon is 50 Years Old

Harlem is often the deciding stretch of the NYC Marathon – where leaders pull away, and dreams are won and shattered. This year, with COVID-19, we are not going to have the NYC Marathon pass through Harlem.

See: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/13/sports/new-york-city-marathon.html

Piano – Free if you pick it up!

Robert is offering a piano for free if you are willing to pick it up and take it home. It’s a Story & Clark. It needs tuning and some repairs.

Please email: pgreen5.rg at Gmail if you’re interested.

Preparing for the 2nd Wave

The data regarding the impact of COVID-19 continues to be terrifying. The CDC has documented well over 6 million COVID-19 cases, and the numbers in states like Georgia, Florida, Texas, and California continue to increase:

See: https://covid.cdc.gov/covid-data-tracker/#cases

With the coming fall/winter season, health officials continue to remind New Yorkers to remain vigilant. Wear your masks (over your nose and mouth), socialize outside and maintain social distance.

To learn more about the science behind masks: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/diy-cloth-face-coverings.html

To learn more about the science behind not getting infected: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/prevention.html

To get free testing near you: https://coronavirus.health.ny.gov/find-test-site-near-you

Patch – Report on New Yorkers’ Attitudes to COVID-19

New Yorkers who fear the coronavirus pandemic could come back worse than ever aren’t alone — it’s a worry shared by 62 percent of people in the state, a new survey found.

A Siena College Research Institute survey found widespread doubt COVID-19 will stay contained in New York. A 70 percent swath of New Yorkers largely support government efforts to stop the virus’ spread even if it hurts the economy.

“Majorities of every demographic, except Republicans, think that we haven’t seen the worst of the pandemic, and majorities of every demographic want the government to concentrate on containing the virus even if the economy suffers,” said Don Levy, the institute’s director, in a statement. “Nearly 80 percent are concerned that they, or another member of their household, will get sick with COVID-19.”

The survey indicates New York’s swing from coronavirus epicenter to success story isn’t making its residents, including those in New York City, complacent.

Beyond the 62 percent who fear the worst is yet to come, 82 percent of those surveyed think it’s likely the state will face another large COVID-19 outbreak in the fall.

Large numbers of New Yorkers still adhere to public health recommendations, the survey found. For example, 73 percent always wear a protective mask outside their homes and 56 percent follow social distancing recommendations completely.

Between 56 and 64 percent of New Yorkers feel comfortable with eating outdoors at a restaurant, going to a playground or park, going to a barbershop or salon and visiting a beach.

But when asked about indoor dining — a growing hot topic in New York City, where it is still banned — 65 percent were not comfortable eating inside a restaurant, according to the survey.

Read the full results here.

Advancing Black Entrepreneurs

Black Enterprise is excited to announce a new partnership with Chase for Business to offer Advancing Black Entrepreneurs — an education program designed to help Black business owners recover and move forward in the wake of the current global pandemic.



Joining us in this important effort are National Minority Supplier Development Council, National Urban League and the US Black Chambers, Inc.

Together, we’ve developed a series of information-packed sessions – the first of which focuses on Reclaiming the Future: How Your Business Can Rise to the Challenges of COVID-19.

This ninety-minute guided digital session, offered at no cost, will cover topics including:

The increasing importance of bookkeepingPivoting your business model in this new economic environment

Helping your customers feel confident and safe

Developing contingency plans for the future

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to get the financial guidance and expertise you need to grow your business.

Join us:
Black Enterprise Webinar
2pm EDT
September 16, 2020

  
 © 2020 BLACK ENTERPRISE | New York, NY, 10016, USA   

Your 2020 Voting Options in New York

This year, registered voters can vote three ways: By absentee ballot, in-person early voting, or in-person voting on Election Day, November 3, 2020.

All registered voters can request an absentee ballot if they are concerned about COVID-19 for the November 3 election. Signed absentee ballots can be returned to drop boxes without a wait at over 300 locations statewide.

REQUEST AN ABSENTEE BALLOT You may return the ballot in any of the following ways:

  1. Put it in the mail ensuring it receives a postmark no later than November 3
  2. Drop it off at an early voting poll site between October 24th and November 1
  3. Drop it off at a poll site on November 3 by 9pm
  4. Drop it off at your County Board of Elections Office starting September 8 until no later than November 3 by 9pm:

Manhattan Absentee Ballot Dropoff Location

200 Varick Street, 10 Fl
New York, NY 10014

Tel1-212-886-2100 Fax1-646-638-2047

 Refer to these instructions on completing your absentee ballot.