CORRECTION: HNBA Meeting Tonight at 2306 3rd Avenue, at 7:00 PM

Hello Harlem Neighbors,

Tonight at 7:00 PM (Tuesday) we will meet in person at 2306 3rd Avenue in the gorgeous Salvation Army building (sorry the incorrect location was sent earlier):

We are going to talk about public safety issues around the supervised injection site, and we are going to have a special guest – Special Agent Quintero of the FBI.

Special Agent Quinterro will talk to us about her work, her team’s work, and the FBI as a whole’s work on human rights violations, hate crimes, and color of law (corrupt law enforcement).  Make sure to bring any questions you have about these issues and how the FBI handles them and how it impacts all of us and our community.

Photography or recording is not permitted.

HNBA Meeting Tonight at 7:00 PM

Hello Harlem Neighbors,

Tonight at 7:00 PM (Tuesday) we will meet in person at 175 East 125th Street in the gorgeous Salvation Army building:

We are going to talk about public safety issues around the supervised injection site, and we are going to have a special guest – Special Agent Quintero of the FBI.

Special Agent Quinterro will talk to us about her work, her team’s work, and the FBI as a whole’s work on human rights violations, hate crimes, and color of law (corrupt law enforcement).  Make sure to bring any questions you have about these issues and how the FBI handles them and how it impacts all of us and our community.

Photography or recording is not permitted.

A History of the Churches

A History of the Churches of All Denominations in the City of New York (1846) has some interesting information about the early history of faith-based organizations in Harlem.

The oldest church identified as being in Harlem is the Dutch Reformed Church, from 1686 with 126 members:

The African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church is noted as starting in 1796, and then in 1843 established “Little Zion” a branch in Harlem – predating most estimations as to when a Black presence in Harlem had grown to a significant size:

And, to conclude:

Harlem Art For (Benefit) Sale

A benefit exhibit for City College Center for the Arts’ youth programs, this sophomore installment of “100 Years of Harlem” continues the centennial celebration of Harlem’s galvanizing, glorious past while emphasizing Harlem as a muse and teacher across space and time.

Press Release

“100 Years of Harlem: Resonating Around the World” was first introduced in an exhibition and silent auction to benefit City College Center for the Arts held at CHRISTIE’S New York from March 26 – April 4, 2022. Curated by irwin House Gallery Director, Omo Misha, on behalf of an esteemed curatorial team including Kim Wales and Gregory Shanck, the primary exhibit included thirty works of art celebrating Harlem as teacher and muse for diverse artists across time and featured twenty-four visual artists from Harlem and across the country. The CHRISTIE’S x CCCA collaboration was an outgrowth of the company’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) program – a program that aims to preserve, protect and promote art in our communities while managing the cultural, economic and environmental impact of Christie’s activities. For CHRISTIE’S, the experience brought forth a lively discourse with local, living talent and a lasting partnership with one of Harlem’s leading cultural institutions. For the artists and audience, the auction house installation and gala proved grand and incomparable, netting support for CCCA’s Youth Empowerment Program through art sales and both private and corporate donations.
Brought to CCCA’s Aaron Davis Hall, this iteration of 100 Years extends the life and scope of the exhibition and continues the celebration of Harlem, its glorious past and culturally-rich present. The exhibition includes a portion of the work exhibited at CHRISTIE’S along with new selections and artists reflecting and sharing an affinity for Harlem.

Escaping the harsh realities of the Jim Crow South, Black Americans found their way to Harlem more than any other location during the early twentieth century, resulting in the largest concentration of African descendants outside of Africa, and creating a social climate for one of the most prolific eras in the history of the arts and letters – the Harlem Renaissance. Through visual, literary and performative expressions of lived experiences, beauty and pain, an aesthetic emerged that came to identify Black America. An unprecedented artistic freedom flourished and became a resonant elixir to the creative world.

This exhibition pays homage to the Harlem Renaissance with recognition that the enclave’s cultural grind has been a continuum – from the 1920s to present day. The banners of Harlem legends still fly, and the pioneering stanzas of Langston Hughes’ poems, Aaron Douglass’ palette, and Duke Ellington’s top hat and riffs will always be felt within the cracks of our sidewalks and Pre-War facades. But, as we celebrate this galvanizing, glorious past we also hope to communicate that The Renaissance was not a finite era that met a determinate end. While the landscape has ebbed, flowed and even lost its luster at times, the collective, creative spirit of Harlem has never waned. Each of us, represented in this exhibit, are links in a chain of prodigious creators, flowing through and bathed in the nurturing spirit of Harlem.
Featured Artists: ANTON, Carl Karni-Bain (aka BAI), Charly Palmer, Danny Simmons, D. H. Caranda Martin, Donovan Nelson, Faith Ringgold, Francks Deceus, James Denmark, Jody Rasch, Julio Leitão, Julio Mejia, Lisa Ingram, Lola Flash, Mira Gandy, Noreen Dean Dresser, Uday Dhar, Terrell Anglin, Tomo Mori, YUKAKO.

https://www.artsy.net/show/irwin-house-gallery-100-years-of-harlem-resonating-around-the-world?sort=partner_show_position

Mart 125

Harlem’s Mart 125: the American Dream is a documentary film about the history of Mart 125 on 125th Street and how it has served as a physical and imagined embodiment of Black commerce in the face of commercial, cultural, and political change in the heart of Harlem.

View the video with the link, below:

https://youtu.be/QTawVjvLjyk

Also make sure to check out GothamtoGo’s blog post on the revitalization of Mart 125:

Booker T. Washington

As seen in Harlem.

Upper Park Avenue Baptist Church

A sign from the late 1960’s addressing ‘dope gangsters’:

is a part of a collection of signs on East Harlem’s Upper Park Avenue Baptist Church.

The brownstone details next to the church may look familiar, they are part of the Corn Exchange building – 85 East 125th Street. Below is the former location of the Upper Park Avenue Baptist Church:

To read the obituary of the pastor who ran this 125th Street church, see:

https://www.nytimes.com/1982/10/04/obituaries/rev-oberia-dempsey-is-dead-fought-drug-abuse-in-harlem.html

Looking Back at HNBA.nyc in 2022

How To Get Rid Of Stuff?

Not Sure How To Get Rid Of Your Stuff? 
Paint, batteries, electronics—even clothing—there’s always something we don’t need taking up valuable space. Some items can live a second life with someone else, or may need to be safely disposed. We can help!

Visit nyc.gov/HowToGetRidOf and use our search tool to find your disposal options.

If you didn’t receive our June mailer highlighting all our disposal programs, you can download a PDF.

It’s available in English, Albanian, Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, French, Haitian Creole, Hindi, Italian, Korean, Polish, Russian, Spanish, Urdu, and Yiddish.

Park Avenue Metro-North Viaduct Replacement Contract Awarded

The MTA will be awarding the Design-Build contract for the Park Avenue Viaduct Phase 1 Project to Halmar International, following yesterday’s MTA Board Meeting. The Phase 1 Project will replace the existing viaduct in its entirety from the north side of E. 115th Street to the south side of E. 123rd Street along Park Avenue in East Harlem.

Halmar International was selected by the MTA for providing the overall best value solution that also minimized impacts to the surrounding community. Proposals were evaluated against several criteria such as their plan and ability to minimize impacts to the public, including the surrounding businesses, residences, and community gathering facilities, as well as the pedestrian and vehicular traffic through and adjacent to the project, while also minimizing impact to Metro-North Customers, and the Harlem–125th Street station. The project is expected to reduce local noise and vibration levels compared to those from the existing viaduct by utilizing modern design and materials. 

Additionally, as part of the Project Labor Agreement, the MTA and Building and Construction Trades Council (BCTC) are working together to provide meaningful training and job opportunities for the local residents of Harlem. With partners in the Apprenticeship Readiness Collective (ARC), the MTA and BCTC commit to providing pre-apprenticeship training for Harlem residents that have real pathways into union jobs created by the construction of the project. 

MTA and Halmar International will work together to uphold MTA’s commitment to minimize disruption to the surrounding community and deliver the project as safely and quickly as possible. 

We currently anticipate construction to begin in the second quarter of 2023, and expect it to be complete in 2026. The community can also expect regular communication, during construction, including regular updates and at key milestones on the project’s webpage https://new.mta.info/project/park-avenue-viaduct and dedicated email address ([email protected]) to field concerns.

We appreciate your continued partnership on this as we deliver this vital infrastructure project as safely and efficiently as possible.

Thank you,

Park Avenue Viaduct Project Team

  • The Park Avenue Viaduct is an elevated steel structure built in 1893 (128 years ago) which carries four Metro-North Railroad tracks above Park Avenue in East Harlem.
  • 98% of all Metro-North trains use the viaduct
  • 750 trains and 220,000 customers use the viaduct on a typical (Pre-Covid) weekday
  • The viaduct served 5.3 million customers at Harlem-125 Street Station in 2019
  • Harlem-125th Street Station is 3rd busiest in Metro-North system (PreCovid)

Edward Hopper and Harlem

The Whitney Museum has opened an exhibition of the work of Edward Hopper – the famed mid-century American artist who created a number of iconic images of the alienation in urban life.

Hopper also created a two-page drawing of the Macombs Dam Bridge (155th Street) that now connects Sugar Hill to Yankee Stadium.

In the 1850’s, a century before Hopper illustrated the scene, you can see in the drawing (below) that the structure was truly a combination dam and bridge.

Hopper’s drawing (below) from the 1930’s shows the bridge structure pretty much as it stands today, with no Yankee Stadium or much development on the hill on the Bronx side of the Harlem River

A contemporary photograph shows how faithful Hopper’s sketch was.

“As New York bounces back after two challenging years of global pandemic, this exhibition reconsiders the life and work of Edward Hopper, serves as a barometer of our times, and introduces a new generation of audiences to Hopper’s work by a new generation of scholars. This exhibition offers fresh perspectives and radical new insights.”

Hopper’s relationship with Whitney began in 1920 when he had his first solo exhibition at the Whitney Studio Club, which closed in 1928 to make way for the Whitney Museum of American Art. Hopper’s work first appeared in the inaugural Whitney Biennial in 1932 and in 29 Biennials and Annuals through 1965, according to the museum. In 1968, Hopper’s widow, artist Josephine Nivison Hopper, bequeathed the entirety of his collection to the museum, which today is home to more than 3,100 works by the artist.

Edward Hopper’s New York will be on view from October 19, 2022, through March 5, 2023.

Calvary Church – 1908

A view of the Calvary M. E. Church on a 1908 postcard (at the corner of W. 129/ACP):

And today:

What To Do With The Tree?

DSNY’s Christmas Tree Collection Options

DSNY will collect clean Christmas trees (and wreaths!) from Friday, January 6, 2023 through Saturday, January 14, 2023 — weather permitting.

Remember, Christmas trees and wreaths are collected separately from your trash and recycling. They are scouted at the curb to make efficient collection routes, so yours may not be picked up immediately.

Before your Christmas trees and wreaths can be collected, you MUST:

  • Remove ALL lights, ornaments, tinsel, and stands. Remove stands from trees and metal frames and wires from wreaths.
  • Make sure they are not wrapped in ANY plastic or placed inside a plastic bag.
  • Leave them at the curb between the designated dates (January 6 – 14).

Trees and wreaths are chipped, mixed with leaves, and recycled into rich compost for NYC’s parks, institutions, and community gardens.

Artificial Trees

Donate or sell used artificial trees in good condition at donateNYC.

You can also take apart your tree to recycle the base and trunk (pole) with your metal, glass, plastic and cartons. Remove all lights, ornaments and tinsel before placing at the curb.

Otherwise, set it out as garbage on a regular collection day. Look up your collection schedule.

Make Your Own Mulch

Use evergreen boughs and branches from your Christmas tree as mulch to enrich the soil in your garden or street tree beds. Just cut off the smaller branches of your Christmas tree and remove the twigs from evergreen boughs. Lay three to four inches of these trimmings over the bare soil around street trees or in your garden. After removing the branches for mulch, you can take your tree to Mulchfestor leave it out for our collection.

Charlie Brown and Linus pick out a scrawny tree in A Charlie Brown Christmas, a TV special based on the “Peanuts” comic strip by Charles M. Schulz. The beloved show is airing for the 50th year Tuesda


Mulchfest

Remove all ornaments, lights, tinsel, and stands from natural trees and take them to Mulchfestfor free chipping.

Visit our website for more information.

Fats Waller in Harlem

Fats Waller composed a series of hit songs and was also widelyu known for his comic performances on stage and in film.

His innovations in his piano work led to the Harlem stride-style – a precursor to modern jazz piano. His best-known compositions, “Ain’t Misbehavin’” and “Honeysuckle Rose”, were inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1984 and 1999. Waller copyrighted over 400 songs, many of them co-written with his closest collaborator, Andy Razaf. Razaf described his partner as:

“the soul of melody… a man who made the piano sing… both big in body and in mind… known for his generosity… a bubbling bundle of joy”.

In the photo below he is seen in Harlem with fellow stride-style pianist Willie ‘The Lion’ Smith:

Worst Landlords

The Public Advocate has a list of the worst landlords in NYC out for 2022. The map shows definitively that the worst landlords have the most violations in low-income communities, and are congregated in northern Manhattan, The Bronx, and Brooklyn.

https://www.landlordwatchlist.com/

Note that housing law protects your right as a tenant to meet with other tenants in a public space in the building. You should speak with other tenants who are facing similar problems and organize a meeting time in the building. The meeting can be advertised through fliers or posters placed in the building. At the first meeting, the representative of the association should be appointed by the group and a set of action items should be decided.

60 Years Ago

60 years ago (admittedly in the summer) Robert Kennedy came to Harlem. He spoke at Columbia, visited a summer reading program for youth, and then walked with children in the reading program along West 125th street into the heart of Harlem.

Jet covered the visit and put this image on its cover:

Summer Plans? Broccoli

BROCCOLI CITY FESTIVAL IS BACK!!

JULY 15-16TH 2023
RFK STADIUM GROUNDS DC

BE THE FIRST TO KNOW ABOUT PRESALE TICKETS, LINE-UP & OTHER FESTIVAL UPDATES.

WILL BE THE BIGGEST AND BEST #BCFESTIVAL EVER!!!!

Learn more HERE.